Publications by authors named "Hanaa Elbrense"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Drosophila melanogaster as a low-cost and valuable model for studying type 2 diabetes.

J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol 2022 06 21;337(5):457-466. Epub 2022 Feb 21.

Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt.

Drosophila melanogaster has been used as the most successful invertebrate model for studying metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). We induced T2D by feeding Drosophila larvae on a high-sugar diet (HSD). The glucose and trehalose, glycogen, lipid, triglyceride, and protein levels were determined in HSD-fed larvae. Moreover, larval food intake, water content, size, and weight in addition to the development until pupation were observed. Levels of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs 2, 3, and 5), as well as adipokinetic hormone (AKH), were also determined in HSD-fed larvae by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that HSD could induce elevated levels of glucose, trehalose, glycogen, and proteins in larvae. The larvae consumed less food intake and were smaller, lighter, and less developed on HSD than those on the control diet. Moreover, the water content of larvae fed HSD was similar to that fed the control diet. HSD induced higher expression of DILP3 and AKH, confirming hyperglycemia with insulin resistance. In sum, Drosophila offers an appropriate model for quick and inexpensive in vivo experimentation on human metabolic diseases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jez.2580DOI Listing
June 2022

Can Symbiotic Bacteria ( and ) Be More Efficient than Their Entomopathogenic Nematodes against and Larvae?

Biology (Basel) 2021 Oct 4;10(10). Epub 2021 Oct 4.

Department of Economic Entomology and Agricultural Zoology, Faculty of Agriculture, Menoufia University, Shibin El-Kom 32514, Egypt.

and are considered a global threat to agricultural crops and food security; hence, their control is a critical issue. and nematodes, along with their symbiotic bacteria, can achieve the optimal biocontrol agent criterion. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of , and their symbiotic bacteria ( and ) against and larvae. The virulence of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) was determined at different infective juvenile concentrations and exposure times, while the symbiotic bacteria were applied at the concentration of 3 × 10 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL at different exposure times. Gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (GC-MS) analysis and the cytotoxic effect of sp. and sp. were determined. The results indicated that . , . , and their symbiotic bacteria significantly ( ≤ 0.001) induced mortality in both insect species. However, . and its symbiont, sp., were more virulent. Moreover, the data clarified that both symbiotic bacteria outperformed EPNs against but the opposite was true for GC-MS analysis revealed the main active compounds that have insecticidal activity. However, the results revealed that there was no significant cytotoxic effect. In conclusion, . , . , and their symbiotic bacteria can be an optimal option for bio-controlling both insect species. Furthermore, both symbiotic bacteria can be utilized independently on EPNs for the management of both pests, and, hence, they can be safely incorporated into biocontrol programs and tested against other insect pests.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biology10100999DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8533234PMC
October 2021

Hormonal modulation of cannibalistic behaviors in mosquito (Culex pipiens) larvae.

J Insect Physiol 2018 Aug - Sep;109:144-148. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Zoology Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt.

Cannibalism has been observed occasionally in a limited number of different animal species, but the underlying mechanisms that foster this behavior are mostly unknown. Here we show that mosquito (Culex pipiens) larvae show this behavior towards conspecifics under certain conditions. Cannibalism was only observed in 4th instar larvae and only in response to starvation. Well fed animals never showed any cannibalistic behavior. Starvation induced cannibalism of Culex 4th instar was predominantly directed towards 3rd instars rather than to 1st or 2nd instar larvae. Specific mandibular structures of these larvae enable this cannibalistic behavior. We could show that treatment with the biogenic amine octopamine, which is known to be involved in the control of starvation and aggression, increased the rate of cannibalism of food-deprived 4th instar larvae significantly. Incubation with the octopamine receptor antagonist phentolamine suppressed this cannibalistic behavior. Moreover, octopamine not only increased the rate of cannibalism, it also induced a shift towards smaller prey. A role of octopamine in this starvation induced behavior was further supported by direct measurements of the total content of this important neuroactive compound. Taken together, we could show that 4th instar mosquito larvae showed cannibalistic behavior after starvation and that this behavior apparently depends on octopamine.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jinsphys.2018.08.001DOI Listing
September 2019
-->