Publications by authors named "Hamoudi Khalaily"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The anurans and squamates assemblage from Final Natufian Eynan (Ain Mallaha, Israel) with an emphasis on snake-human interactions.

PLoS One 2021 25;16(2):e0247283. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

National Natural History Collections, Institute of Earth Sciences, Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.

During the Natufian period, more than 12,000 years ago, Eynan (Ain Mallaha) was an important human settlement in the Hula Valley, Israel. This study concentrates on the anuran and squamate assemblage from the ultimate stage of the Natufian period at the site, the Final Natufian. Over five thousand bones assigned to at least sixteen taxa were studied from a sampled segment of the excavated open-air site. Relative species abundance, spatial distribution, taphonomic observations and ecological considerations all pointed to the conclusion that the inhabitants of Eynan intensively exploited three large "colubrine" snakes species: the Large Whip Snake (Dolichophis jugularis), the Eastern Montpellier Snake (Malpolon insignitus) and an Eastern Four-lined Ratsnake (Elaphe cf. sauromates). These snakes were the most desired and were intensively gathered, while other snakes and lizards could have been opportunistically collected when encountered. We raise questions about whether the large "colubrines" exploitation should be interpreted as additional evidence of increasing diet breadth. We suggest challenging this line of reasoning and offer possible alternative motives.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0247283PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7906325PMC
February 2021

Emergence of corpse cremation during the Pre-Pottery Neolithic of the Southern Levant: A multidisciplinary study of a pyre-pit burial.

PLoS One 2020 12;15(8):e0235386. Epub 2020 Aug 12.

National Natural History Collections, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.

Renewed excavations at the Neolithic site of Beisamoun (Upper Jordan Valley, Israel) has resulted in the discovery of the earliest occurrence of an intentional cremation in the Near East directly dated to 7031-6700 cal BC (Pre-Pottery Neolithic C, also known as Final PPNB, which spans ca. 7100-6400 cal BC). The funerary treatment involved in situ cremation within a pyre-pit of a young adult individual who previously survived from a flint projectile injury. In this study we have used a multidisciplinary approach that integrates archaeothanatology, spatial analysis, bioanthropology, zooarchaeology, soil micromorphological analysis, and phytolith identification in order to reconstruct the different stages and techniques involved in this ritual: cremation pit construction, selection of fuel, possible initial position of the corpse, potential associated items and funerary containers, fire management, post-cremation gesture and structure abandonment. The origins and development of cremation practices in the region are explored as well as their significance in terms of Northern-Southern Levantine connections during the transition between the 8th and 7th millennia BC.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0235386PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7423105PMC
September 2020

Reply to Dekel et al.: Preagricultural commensal niches for the house mouse and origins of human sedentism.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2017 07 13;114(27):E5281-E5282. Epub 2017 Jun 13.

CNRS, UMR 7209 Archéozoologie, Archéobotanique: Sociétés, Pratiques et Environnements, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 75005 Paris, France;

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1706914114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5502652PMC
July 2017

Origins of house mice in ecological niches created by settled hunter-gatherers in the Levant 15,000 y ago.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2017 04 27;114(16):4099-4104. Epub 2017 Mar 27.

Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, CNRS-UMR 7209, Archéozoologie, Archéobotanique: Sociétés, Pratiques et Environnements, 75005 Paris, France;

Reductions in hunter-gatherer mobility during the Late Pleistocene influenced settlement ecologies, altered human relations with animal communities, and played a pivotal role in domestication. The influence of variability in human mobility on selection dynamics and ecological interactions in human settlements has not been extensively explored, however. This study of mice in modern African villages and changing mice molar shapes in a 200,000-y-long sequence from the Levant demonstrates competitive advantages for commensal mice in long-term settlements. Mice from African pastoral households provide a referential model for habitat partitioning among mice taxa in settlements of varying durations. The data reveal the earliest known commensal niche for house mice in long-term forager settlements 15,000 y ago. Competitive dynamics and the presence and abundance of mice continued to fluctuate with human mobility through the terminal Pleistocene. At the Natufian site of Ain Mallaha, house mice displaced less commensal wild mice during periods of heavy occupational pressure but were outcompeted when mobility increased. Changing food webs and ecological dynamics in long-term settlements allowed house mice to establish durable commensal populations that expanded with human societies. This study demonstrates the changing magnitude of cultural niche construction with varying human mobility and the extent of environmental influence before the advent of farming.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1619137114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5402403PMC
April 2017

Human Hunting and Nascent Animal Management at Middle Pre-Pottery Neolithic Yiftah'el, Israel.

PLoS One 2016 6;11(7):e0156964. Epub 2016 Jul 6.

Department of Anthropology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, United States of America.

The current view for the southern Levant is that wild game hunting was replaced by herd management over the course of the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period, but there is significant debate over the timing, scale and origin of this transition. To date, most relevant studies focus either on wild game exploitation in the periods prior to domestication or on classic markers of domestication of domestic progenitor species over the course of the PPNB. We studied the faunal remains from the 2007-2008 excavations of the Middle PPNB (MPPNB) site of Yiftah'el, Northern Israel. Our analysis included a close examination of the timing and impact of the trade-off between wild game and domestic progenitor taxa that reflects the very beginning of this critical transition in the Mediterranean zone of the southern Levant. Our results reveal a direct trade-off between the intensive hunting of wild ungulates that had been staples for millennia, and domestic progenitor taxa. We suggest that the changes in wild animal use are linked to a region-wide shift in the relationship between humans and domestic progenitor species including goat, pig and cattle.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0156964PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4934702PMC
August 2017

The plastered skulls from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B site of Yiftahel (Israel)--a computed tomography-based analysis.

PLoS One 2014 19;9(2):e89242. Epub 2014 Feb 19.

Department of Excavations, Surveys and Research, Israel Antiquities Authority, Jerusalem, Israel.

Three plastered skulls, dating to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B, were found at the site of Yiftahel, in the Lower Galilee (Israel). The skulls underwent refitting and restoration processes, details of which are described herein. All three belong to adults, of which two appear to be males and one appears to be a female. Virtual cross-sections were studied and a density analysis of the plaster was performed using computed tomography scans. These were utilized to yield information regarding the modeling process. Similarities and differences between the Yiftahel and other plastered skulls from the Levant are examined. The possible role of skull plastering within a society undergoing a shift from a hunting-gathering way of life to a food producing strategy is discussed.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0089242PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3929714PMC
October 2014