Publications by authors named "Hamidreza Kazemi"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Performance assessment of stormwater GI practices using artificial neural networks.

Sci Total Environ 2019 Feb 12;651(Pt 2):2811-2819. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Center for Infrastructure Research, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, United States. Electronic address:

This study evaluates the performance of a suite of stormwater green infrastructure (GI) practices at the Belknap Campus, University of Louisville. In lack of instrumentation within individual GIs, and detailed drainage and sewer information, data mining procedures and artificial neural networks (ANN) were used. Two separate Back Propagation Neural Network Models (BPNNMs) were developed to estimate the reductions of flow volume and peak flow rates within the combined sewer system. The results from developed BPNNMs showed that following the construction of stormwater GIs at the Belknap campus, downstream wet-weather related flow decreased. The developed BPNNMs showed that the flow volume reduction and the peak flow attenuation rates had averages of approximately 33% and 61% per storm event, respectively. The flow reduction rates generally were lower for larger storms. Similarly, the peak flow rates decreased by increase of maximum intensity values per storm. However, further analysis indicated that even for large storm events, with long durations, the GIs had a positive impact on mitigation of combined sewer flows. Additionally, using rainfall data and downstream sewer flow in conjunction with artificial neural network modeling, was determined to be an effective technique for evaluating the combined hydrological performance of a suite of stormwater GIs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.155DOI Listing
February 2019

Evaluation of a Single Dose Intravenous Paracetamol for Pain Relief After Maxillofacial Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial Study.

J Maxillofac Oral Surg 2014 Dec 6;13(4):478-82. Epub 2013 Aug 6.

Shiraz University of Medical Science, Shiraz, Iran.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate, using a single dose of intravenous paracetamol, pain relief after maxillofacial surgery.

Materials And Methods: This is a controlled, randomized, uni- blind, clinical trial study to evaluate using a single dose of IV paracetamol for pain relief after maxillofacial surgery. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups with 40 subjects in each: group I received paracetamol (Apotel)* as a single dose and group II received placebo. Subjects were randomly allocated according to randomization lists. Paracetamol was used as a single dose (20 mg/kg in 100 cc of normal saline which was infused for 10 min after surgery in recovery room just before discharging). We used a visual analogue scale to investigate pain relief at various times.

Results: Analysis of the data, did not show any significant difference for age, sex and weight between the treatment group and the control group. Pain decreased 6 h after paracetamol infusion; then it increased mildly. In the control group, pain severity increased after operation, then it decreased mildly. Results showed a correlation between duration of surgery and pain severity in both the groups.

Conclusion: Paracetamol is effective on pain relief after maxillofacial surgeries. Operation time may be an important factor for induction of pain after the surgeries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12663-013-0557-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4518801PMC
December 2014

Correlation of clinical predictions and surgical results in maxillary superior repositioning.

J Craniofac Surg 2014 May;25(3):e220-3

From the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shiraz University of Medical Science, Shiraz, Iran.

This is a prospective study to evaluate the accuracy of clinical predictions related to surgical results in subjects who underwent maxillary superior repositioning without anterior-posterior movement. Surgeons' predictions according to clinical (tooth show at rest and at the maximum smile) and cephalometric evaluation were documented for the amount of maxillary superior repositioning. Overcorrection or undercorrection was documented for every subject 1 year after the operations. Receiver operating characteristic curve test was used to find a cutoff point in prediction errors and to determine positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value. Forty subjects (14 males and 26 females) were studied. Results showed a significant difference between changes in the tooth show at rest and at the maximum smile line before and after surgery. Analysis of the data demonstrated no correlation between the predictive data and the surgical results. The incidence of undercorrection (25%) was more common than overcorrection (7.5%). The cutoff point for errors in predictions was 5 mm for tooth show at rest and 15 mm at the maximum smile. When the amount of the presurgical tooth show at rest was more than 5 mm, 50.5% of clinical predictions did not match the clinical results (PPV), and 75% of clinical predictions showed the same results when the tooth show was less than 5 mm (negative predictive value). When the amount of presurgical tooth shown in the maximum smile line was more than 15 mm, 75% of clinical predictions did not match with clinical results (PPV), and 25% of the predictions had the same results because the tooth show at the maximum smile was lower than 15 mm. Clinical predictions according to the tooth show at rest and at the maximum smile have a poor correlation with clinical results in maxillary superior repositioning for vertical maxillary excess. The risk of errors in predictions increased when the amount of superior repositioning of the maxilla increased. Generally, surgeons have a tendency to undercorrect rather than overcorrect, although clinical prediction is an original guideline for surgeons, and it may be associated with variable clinical results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000000415DOI Listing
May 2014

Rapidly growing lesions involving the maxilla in infants: a two-case presentation and deferential diagnosis.

J Craniofac Surg 2013 Jul;24(4):e434-8

Shiraz University of Medical Science, Shiraz, Iran.

Several pathologic lesions can be responsible for rapid swelling of the maxilla during infancy. Two of these uncommon lesions are melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy (MNTI) and myofibroma. Despite these lesions being benign, they can have a destructive behavior that needs a meticulous diagnosis and early intervention. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy often presents as a fast-growing lesion, suggesting a clinical impression of infection or malignant neoplasm. Local excision and curettage are appropriate treatments for MNTI. Myofibromas are a rare lesion in the maxilla during infancy and sometimes are mistaken for malignant lesions. Surgical excision has been considered as a choice treatment for maxillomandibular lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e3182942e18DOI Listing
July 2013