Publications by authors named "Hamidreza Kafi"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Study of the neuroprotective effects of memantine in patients with mild to moderate ischemic stroke.

Iran J Pharm Res 2014 ;13(2):591-8

Imam Hossein Medical and Educational Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Ischemic stroke is amongst the top four causes of mortality and the leading cause of disability in the world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a high dose memantine on neurological function of patients with ischemic stroke. In a randomized, 2 armed, open-label study, patients with mild to moderate cerebral thromboembolic event (CTEE) who admitted to Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran, Iran, during preceding 24 hours, entered the study. Patients allocated in two study groups of memantine (as add-on therapy) and control. All patients were managed based on the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) guidelines. Patients in memantine group received conventional treatment plus memantine 20 mg TID. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was determined and recorded daily. The primary objective was comparison of the changes in NIHSS in the study groups at day 1 and day 5 of intervention. Significance level of p<0.05 was considered for statistical analysis. Patients were randomly allocated in control (15 women and 14 men, age 70.78 ± 10.92 years) and memantine (16 women and 8 men, age 73.33 ± 9.35 years) groups. There were no significant differences in age and sex distribution of two study groups as well as in comorbidities and concurrent drugs. NIHSS changes were significantly different between control (1.24 ± 0.96) and memantine group (2.96 ± 0.1), (p < 0.0001). Our results reveal that memantine added to standard treatment of CTEE could result in a remarkable decrease in the NIHSS confirming improvement of the neurological function of the patients.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157035PMC
September 2014

Increasing the number of adverse drug reactions reporting: the role of clinical pharmacy residents.

Iran J Pharm Res 2014 ;13(1):291-7

Chronic Respiratory Disease Research Center, NRITLD, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. ; Clinical Pharmacy Department, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in hospitals provides an important measure of the burden of drug related morbidity on the healthcare system. Spontaneous reporting of ADRs is scare and several obstacles to such reporting have been identified formerly. This study aimed to determine the role of clinical pharmacy residents in ADR reporting within a hospital setting. Clinical pharmacy residents were trained to report all suspected ADRs through ADR-reporting yellow cards. The incidence, pattern, seriousness, and preventability of the reported ADRs were analyzed. During the period of 12 months, for 8559 patients, 202 ADR reports were received. The most frequently reported reactions were due to anti-infective agents (38.38%). Rifampin accounted for the highest number of the reported ADRs among anti-infective agents. The gastro-intestinal system was the most frequently affected system (21.56%) of all reactions. Fifty four of the ADRs were reported as serious reactions. Eighteen of the ADRs were classified as preventable. Clinical pharmacy residents' involvement in the ADR reporting program could improve the ADR reporting system.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3985255PMC
April 2014