Hamidreza Abdi

Dr. Hamidreza Abdi

MD

University of Ottawa

Resident

Ottawa, Ontario | Canada

Specialties: Urology

Hamidreza Abdi

Dr. Hamidreza Abdi

MD
Introduction

Primary Affiliation: University of Ottawa - Ottawa, Ontario , Canada

Specialties:

Research Interests:

Metrics

5

Publications

1554

Profile Views

22

Reads

7

PubMed Central Citations

Top co-authors
Peter C Black
Peter C Black

University of British Columbia

2
Simon P Duffy
Simon P Duffy

The Hospital for Sick Children

1
Kerryn Matthews
Kerryn Matthews

University of Cape Town

1
Sunyoung Park
Sunyoung Park

Sookmyung Women's University

1
Xi Qin
Xi Qin

Beijing Institute of Biotechnology

1
Richard R Ang
Richard R Ang

University of British Columbia

1
Hongshen Ma
Hongshen Ma

University of British Columbia

1
Kim N Chi
Kim N Chi

BC Cancer Agency

1
Jenny Bazov
Jenny Bazov

University of British Columbia

1

Publications

5Publications

22Reads

7PubMed Central Citations

Balancing risk and benefit of extended pelvic lymph node dissection in patients undergoing radical cystectomy.

World J Urol 2016 Jan 30;34(1):41-8. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

Department of Urologic Sciences, Vancouver Prostate Centre, University of British Columbia, Level 6, 2775 Laurel St, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1M9, Canada.

View Article
January 2016
11 Reads
2 PubMed Central Citations(source)
2.67 Impact Factor

A 2D-3D Registration Framework for Freehand TRUS-Guided Prostate Biopsy

MICCAI (2) 2015: 272-279

Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention -- MICCAI 2015

We present a 2D to 3D registration framework that compensates for prostate motion and deformations during freehand prostate biopsies. It has two major components: 1) a trajectory-based rigid registration to account for gross motions of the prostate; and 2) a non-rigid registration constrained by a finite element model (FEM) to adjust for residual motion and deformations. For the rigid alignment, we constrain the ultrasound probe tip in the live 2D imaging plane to the tracked trajectory from the pre-procedure 3D ultrasound volume. This ensures the rectal wall approximately coincides between the images. We then apply a FEM-based technique to deform the volume based on image intensities. We validate the proposed framework on 10 prostate biopsy patients, demonstrating a mean target registration error (TRE) of 4.63 mm and 3.15 mm for rigid and FEM-based components, respectively.

View Article
November 2015
6 Reads

Size and deformability based separation of circulating tumor cells from castrate resistant prostate cancer patients using resettable cell traps.

Lab Chip 2015 May;15(10):2278-86

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2054-6250 Applied Science Lane, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.

View Article
May 2015
4 Reads
5 PubMed Central Citations(source)

Separation of Circulating Tumor Cells from Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients using Resettable Cell Traps

LAB ON A CHIP 15(10) · APRIL 2015

LAB ON A CHIP 15(10) · APRIL 2015

The enumeration and capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has great potential clinical value by offering a non-invasive means to access tumor materials to diagnose disease and monitor treatment efficacy. Conventional immunoenrichment of CTCs may fail to capture cells with low surface antigen expression. Micropore filtration presents a compelling label-free alternative that enriches for CTCs using their biophysical rather than biochemical characteristics. However, this strategy is prone to clogging of the filter microstructure, which dramatically reduces selectivity after processing large numbers of cells. Here, we use the resettable cell trap (RCT) mechanism to separate cells based on their distinct size and deformability using an adjustable aperture that can be periodically cleared to prevent clogging. Samples were filtered multiple times on chip to improve selectivity. Repeated filtrations achieved over 900x enrichment and over 90% yield of UM-UC13 bladder cancer cells doped into 2x diluted whole blood. CTCs were successfully identified using the RCT device followed by single-cell spectral analysis from patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The RCT device identified 81.8% (18/22) patients with >=5 CTCs per 7.5 ml of blood with a mean count of 257. Within the same patient group, the CellSearch measured >=5 CTCs in only 40.9% (9/22) patients with a mean of 25 CTCs per 7.5 ml of blood. The RCT device identified significantly more CTCs compared to the CellSearch® system and is comparable to other reported label-free separation techniques.

View Article
April 2015
2 Reads
Top co-authors
Peter C Black
Peter C Black

University of British Columbia

2
Simon P Duffy
Simon P Duffy

The Hospital for Sick Children

1
Kerryn Matthews
Kerryn Matthews

University of Cape Town

1
Sunyoung Park
Sunyoung Park

Sookmyung Women's University

1
Xi Qin
Xi Qin

Beijing Institute of Biotechnology

1
Richard R Ang
Richard R Ang

University of British Columbia

1
Hongshen Ma
Hongshen Ma

University of British Columbia

1
Kim N Chi
Kim N Chi

BC Cancer Agency

1
Jenny Bazov
Jenny Bazov

University of British Columbia

1