Publications by authors named "Hamed Jafari-Vayghan"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A comprehensive insight into the effect of glutamine supplementation on metabolic variables in diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

Nutr Metab (Lond) 2020 25;17:80. Epub 2020 Sep 25.

Student Research Committee, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important threats to human health in the twenty-first century. The use of complementary and alternative medicine to prevent, control, and reduce the complications of diabetes mellitus is increasing at present. Glutamine amino acid is known as a functional food. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine the potential role of glutamine supplementation on metabolic variables in diabetes mellitus. For this review, PubMed, SCOPUS, Embase, ProQuest, and Google Scholar databases were searched from inception through April 2020. All clinical trial and animal studies assessing the effects of glutamine on diabetes mellitus were eligible for inclusion. 19 studies of 1482 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of the 19 studies, nine studies reported a significant increase in serum GLP-1 levels. Also, eight studies showed reducing in serum levels of fasting blood sugar, four studies reducing in postprandial blood sugar, and triglyceride after glutamine supplementation. Although glutamine resulted in a significant increase in insulin production in seven studies, the findings on Hb-A1c levels were inconclusive. In addition to, despite of the results was promising for the effects of glutamine on weight changes, oxidative stress, and inflammation, more precise clinical trials are needed to obtain more accurate results. In conclusion, glutamine supplementation could improve glycemic control and levels of incretins (such as GLP-1 and GIP) in diabetes mellitus. However, more studies are needed for future studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12986-020-00503-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7517657PMC
September 2020

Effect of flaxseed oil supplementation on the erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition and endocannabinoid system modulation in patients with coronary artery disease: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

Genes Nutr 2020 May 5;15(1). Epub 2020 May 5.

Nutrition Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Background: The endocannabinoid system (ECS) overactivation, associated with increased inflammatory process, may act as a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Dietary fat may influence the ECS tone. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of flaxseed oil on the erythrocyte membrane fatty acid profile and ECS activity by the measurement of serum N-arachydonoil ethanolamine (AEA) and cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1), cannabinoid receptor type-2 (CB2), and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) mRNA expression.

Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 44 patients with CAD. The intervention group received 1.5% fat milk supplemented with flaxseed oil (containing 2.5 g α-linolenic acid or ALA), while the placebo group received 1.5% fat milk for 10 weeks. The fatty acid profile of erythrocyte membrane phospholipids was measured by gas chromatography. The AEA level was determined using an ELISA kit, and real-time PCR was performed to measure CB1, CB2, and FAAH mRNA expression pre- and post-intervention.

Results: Flaxseed oil supplementation resulted in a significant increase in the ALA content and a significant reduction in linoleic acid (LA) content of membrane phospholipids, compared to the placebo group (MD = - 0.35 and 2.89, respectively; P < 0.05). The within group analysis showed that flaxseed oil supplementation caused a significant reduction in both LA and arachidonic acid (MD = - 4.84 and - 4.03, respectively; P < 0.05) and an elevation in the ALA (MD = 0.37, P < 0.001) content of membrane phospholipids compared with the baseline. In the intervention group, a marked reduction was observed in the serum AEA level after 10 weeks of intervention, compared with the placebo group (MD = 0.64, P = 0.016). Changes in CB2 mRNA expression in the flaxseed oil group were significant (fold change = 1.30, P = 0.003), compared with the placebo group.

Conclusion: Flaxseed oil supplementation could attenuate the ECS tone by decreasing the AEA level and increasing CB2 mRNA expression. Therefore, flaxseed oil may be considered a promising agent with cardioprotective properties.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12263-020-00665-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7201600PMC
May 2020

Endocannabinoid system and cardiometabolic risk factors: A comprehensive systematic review insight into the mechanistic effects of omega-3 fatty acids.

Life Sci 2020 Jun 14;250:117556. Epub 2020 Mar 14.

Nutrition Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address:

Increased levels of endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and arachidonoyl ethanolamide (AEA) have a pathophysiological role in the setting of cardiometabolic diseases. This systematic review was carried out to appraise the effect of omega-3 on cardiometabolic risk factors by highlighting the mediating effect of endocannabinoids. SCOPUS, PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar and ProQuest databases were searched until January 2020. All published English-language animal studies and clinical trials that evaluated the effects of omega-3 on cardiometabolic diseases with a focus on endocannabinoids were included. Of 1407 studies, 16 animal studies and three clinical trials were included for analysis. Eleven animal studies and two human studies showed a marked reduction in 2-AG and AEA levels following intake of omega-3 which correlated with decreased adiposity, weight gain and improved glucose homeostasis. Moreover, endocannabinoids were elevated in three studies that replaced omega-3 with omega-6. Omega-3 showed anti-inflammatory properties due to reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines, regulation of T-cells function and increased levels of eicosapentaenoyl ethanolamide, docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide and oxylipins; however, a limited number of studies examined a correlation between inflammatory cytokines and endocannabinoids following omega-3 administration. In conclusion, omega-3 modulates endocannabinoid tone, which subsequently attenuates inflammation and cardiometabolic risk factors. However, further randomized clinical trials are needed before any recommendations are made to target the ECS using omega-3 as an alternative therapy to drugs for cardiometabolic disease improvement.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2020.117556DOI Listing
June 2020

Quercetin and polycystic ovary syndrome, current evidence and future directions: a systematic review.

J Ovarian Res 2020 Jan 31;13(1):11. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Student Research Committee, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a polygenic endocrine disorder and the most common gynecological endocrinopathy among reproductive-aged women. Current remedies are often used only to control its signs and symptoms, while they are not thoroughly able to prevent complications. Quercetin is an herbal bioactive flavonoid commonly used for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory disorders. Thus, this systematic review was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of quercetin supplementation in subjects with PCOS. Databases until March 2019 were searched. All human clinical trials and animal models evaluating the effects of quercetin on PCOS women were included. Out of 253 articles identified in our search, 8 eligible articles (5 animal studies and 3 clinical trials) were reviewed. The majority of studies supported the beneficial effects of quercetin on the ovarian histomorphology, folliculogenesis, and luteinisation processes. The effects of quercetin on reducing the levels of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and insulin resistance were also reported. Although quercetin improved dyslipidemia, no significant effect was reported for weight loss. It is suggested that the benefits of quercetin may be more closely related to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory features of quercetin rather than weight-reducing effects. Therefore, this review article provides evidence that quercetin could be considered as a potential agent to attenuate PCOS complications. However, due to the paucity of high-quality clinical trials, further studies are needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13048-020-0616-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6993490PMC
January 2020

Chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) and diabetes mellitus, current knowledge and the way forward: A systematic review.

Complement Ther Med 2020 Jan 17;48:102284. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Student Research Committee, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address:

Chamomile, as a rich source of phenolic compounds and terpenoids, seems to be an effective approach in the management of chronic conditions such as diabetes mellitus. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate evidence from animal and human studies of the effects of chamomile on metabolic risk markers and complications of diabetes mellitus. The literature search was conducted in PubMed, SCOPUS, Embase, ProQuest and Google Scholar electronic and were considered the articles published on April 2019. Original studies that investigated the effect of chamomile in diabetes mellitus which met the inclusion criteria were eligible. After screening 208 citations, 15 studies were included. The results of these studies demonstrated a significant effect of chamomile administration on metabolic profiles. All 12 studies that examined the impact of chamomile supplementation on glycemic control indicated this feature. Four of the five studies appraising the impact of chamomile on lipid profiles showed that it improved dyslipidemia. Six studies showed that chamomile markedly decreased oxidative stress particularly malondialdehyde. Altogether, four chamomile studies evaluating diabetes complications, including renal and hepatic profiles, found significant decreases compared to controls. These findings extend the novel functions of chamomile in the improvement of glycemic and lipid profiles and oxidative stress indicators in diabetes mellitus and related complications. In-depth studies focusing on underlying mechanisms are warranted to make useful conclusions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2019.102284DOI Listing
January 2020

Effect of flaxseed oil supplementation on anthropometric and metabolic indices in patients with coronary artery disease: A double-blinded randomized controlled trial.

J Cardiovasc Thorac Res 2019 30;11(2):152-160. Epub 2019 Jun 30.

Nutrition Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

It has been established that omega 3 fatty acids have cardio-protective effects through modulation of cardiometabolic risk factors via multiple mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of flaxseed oil on anthropometric indices and lipid profile in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed in 44 patients with CAD. The subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 200 ml of 1.5% fat milk supplemented by 5 g of flaxseed oil (containing 2.5 g α-Linolenic acid) as intervention or 200 ml of 1.5% fat milk as placebo group for 10 consecutive weeks. Anthropometric indices and lipid profile were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. The results indicated that supplementation with flaxseed oil had no impact on anthropometric indices. Weight, body mass index, waist circumference and hip circumference decreased statistically significant within groups, but not between groups. At the end of the intervention, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreased significantly ( = 0.022) in the intervention group. Moreover, the triglyceride (TG) level decreased significantly in the intervention group from 173.45 (49.09) to 139.33 (34.26) ( < 0.001). Other lipid profile indices including total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein did not differ significantly within and between groups. We observed that supplementation of flaxseed oil improved TG and DBP but had no effect on other lipid profiles and anthropometric indices in patients with CAD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.15171/jcvtr.2019.26DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6669420PMC
June 2019

Could emotional eating act as a mediator between sleep quality and food intake in female students?

Biopsychosoc Med 2019 18;13:15. Epub 2019 Jun 18.

5Faculty of Health, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran.

Background: Poor sleep quality is associated with overeating and unhealthy eating. The aim of this study was to investigate if emotional eating could act as a mediator between poor sleep quality and energy/macronutrients intake.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed with 150 female school-age students, 13 to 19 years old, living in Tabriz, Iran. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Emotional Eating Questionnaire (EEQ) were completed for data collection. Intake of energy and proportion of calorie from carbohydrate, protein, and fat were evaluated by a semi-quantified food frequency questionnaire. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Results: The mean (SD) of age, weight, and BMI were not statistically different between poor and good sleepers. The mean (SD) of PSQI score was 6.73 ± 2.88, with 75.3% of the participants experiencing poor sleep quality (PSQI> 5). Students with poor sleep quality had increased energy intake and their proportion of calorie intake from fat was higher (<0.05). There was a positive correlation between poor sleep quality and emotional eating; however, emotional eating did not mediate the relationship between poor sleep quality and energy/macronutrients intake.

Conclusions: Emotional eating did not act as a mediator between poor sleep quality and energy/macronutrients intake in female students. However, poor sleep quality directly influenced energy intake and the proportion of calorie intake from fat as well as emotional eating.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13030-019-0154-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6580454PMC
June 2019

The effects of melatonin on neurohormonal regulation in cardiac cachexia: A mechanistic review.

J Cell Biochem 2019 10 6;120(10):16340-16351. Epub 2019 Jun 6.

Department of Clinical Nutrition, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Science, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Heart failure (HF) is one of the prominent health concerns and its morbidity is comparable to many malignancies. Cardiac cachexia (CC), characterized by significant weight loss and muscle wasting, frequently occurs in progressive stage of HF. The pathophysiology of CC is multifactorial including nutritional and gastrointestinal alterations, immunological and neurohormonal activation, and anabolic/catabolic imbalance. Neurohormones are critically involved in the development of both HF and CC. Melatonin is known as an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant hormone. It seems that melatonin possibly regulates the neurohormonal signaling pathway related to muscle wasting in CC, but limited comprehensive data is available on the mechanistic aspects of its activity. In this, we reviewed the reports regarding the role of neurohormones in CC occurrence and possible activity of melatonin in modulation of HF and subsequently CC via neurohormonal regulation. In addition, we have discussed proposed mechanisms of action for melatonin considering its possible interactions with neurohormones. In conclusion, melatonin likely regulates the signaling pathways related to muscle wasting in CC by reducing tumor necrosis factor α levels and activating the gene expression of insulin-like growth factor-1. Also, this hormone inhibits the proteolytic pathway by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), renin-angiotensin system and forkhead box protein O1 pathways and could increase protein synthesis by activating Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin. To elucidate the positive role of melatonin in CC and exact mechanisms related to muscle wasting more cellular and clinical trial studies are needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcb.29151DOI Listing
October 2019

Effects of Royal jelly on metabolic variables in diabetes mellitus: A systematic review.

Complement Ther Med 2019 Apr 2;43:20-27. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Nutrition Research Center, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address:

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in the world. This systematic review was conducted with focus on the current knowledge on the effect of royal jelly on metabolic variables in diabetes mellitus. PubMed, Scopus, Embase, ProQuest and Google Scholar databases were searched from inception until June 2018. All clinical trials and animal studies that evaluated the effects of royal jelly on diabetes mellitus, and were published in English-language journals were eligible. Studies that provided insufficient outcomes were excluded. Out of 522 articles found in the search, only twelve articles were eligible for analysis. Seven studies showed a significant reduction in FBS, and one reported HbA1c decrease following royal jelly supplementation. Although royal jelly supplementation resulted in significant reductions in HOM A-I R in three studies, the findings on insulin levels were controversial. In addition, royal jelly substantially improved serum levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, VLDL and Apo-A1 in diabetes mellitus. In addition, royal jelly resulted in a decrease oxidative stress indicators and increase antioxidant enzymes levels. In conclusion, royal jelly could improve glycemic status, lipid profiles and oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. However, exploring the underlying mechanisms warrants further studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2018.12.022DOI Listing
April 2019

Potential roles of carnitine in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review.

Gynecol Endocrinol 2019 Jun 26;35(6):463-469. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

c Nutrition Research Center, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences , Tabriz University of Medical Sciences , Tabriz , Iran.

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is recognized as the most prevalent endocrinopathy in reproductive-aged women. This systematic review was performed with focus on the current knowledge on carnitine concerning metabolic variables in PCOS. PubMed, Scopus, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov and Google Scholar databases were searched from inception until May 2018. All clinical trials and observational studies published in English-language journals were eligible. Studies that provided insufficient outcomes, animal and in vitro studies were excluded. Out of 451 articles identified in our search, only six articles were eligible for analysis. Two observational studies evaluated the association of serum carnitine levels with metabolic variables, and four clinical trials examined the effect of carnitine supplementation in patients with PCOS. Serum carnitine levels had inverse relationship with glycemic status, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Also, carnitine supplementation resulted in improved weight loss, glycemic status, oxidative stress, follicles and size of ovarian cells; no significant effects were reported on sex hormones and lipid profile. According to the current evidence, carnitine might improve weight loss, glycemic status and oxidative stress. However, to explore the exact mechanisms of carnitine role in patients with PCOS, further studies are recommended.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09513590.2019.1576616DOI Listing
June 2019

Association between dietary patterns and serum leptin-to-adiponectin ratio in apparently healthy adults.

J Am Coll Nutr 2015 3;34(1):49-55. Epub 2015 Feb 3.

a Nutrition Research Center, School of Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences , Tabriz , IRAN.

Objective: Dietary patterns reflect diet and nutritional habits of individuals in a society. Various dietary patterns could influence leptin and adiponectin secretion from adipose tissue. These hormones are associated with metabolic diseases. It is suggested that the leptin-to-adiponectin (L/A) ratio might be a more useful diagnostic marker in predicting chronic diseases than leptin and adiponectin separately. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between various dietary patterns and L/A ratio in Iranian adults.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 150 apparently healthy subjects aged 25-50 years in Tabriz, Iran. Dietary patterns were determined using 132-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire on a 5-point scale. Weight, height, waist circumference (WC), as well as fasting serum leptin and adiponectin levels were measured to assess the association between dietary patterns and L/A ratio.

Results: Four major dietary patterns were identified using a factor analysis approach: Western, healthy, mixed, and traditional dietary patterns. Linear regression analysis showed that a Western dietary pattern was negatively associated with serum adiponectin concentration, even after adjusting for the confounders (r = -0.19, p = 0.02). No statistically significant associations were found between any dietary pattern and leptin (r = -0.14, p = 0.06) or L/A ratio (r = -0.10, p = 0.09).

Conclusion: Our findings indicate an inverse association between a Western dietary pattern and serum adiponectin levels but not for serum leptin or L/A ratio.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07315724.2014.880389DOI Listing
December 2015

Preventive and therapeutic roles of ginseng - focus on colon cancer.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014 ;15(2):585-8

Student Research Committee, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran E-mail :

Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent diseases all over the world. Early screening and start of chemotherapy is effective in decreasing mortality. This type of cancer can be controlled to some extent via a healthy diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Ginseng is a plant which has been consumed as a herbal medicine for thousands of years in Asian countries. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that this plant not only reduces the incidence of colorectal cancer, but also improves patient's status by enhancing the effects of chemotherapy drugs. However, further studies are needed to prove this relationship. We briefly review ginseng and its components such as ginsenosides reported anticancer effects and their mechanisms of action. Understanding these relationships may produce insights into chemical and pharmacological approaches for enhancing the chemo preventive effects of ginsenosides and for developing novel anticancer agents.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2014.15.2.585DOI Listing
November 2014