Publications by authors named "Hakan Sat Bozcuk"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Retrospective analysis of third-line chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

J Cancer Res Ther 2015 Oct-Dec;11(4):805-9

Department of Medical Oncology, Van Training and Research Hospital, Van, Turkey.

Background: First- and second-line chemotherapies have been demonstrated to be effective in treatment of patients with inoperable, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), although the role of third-line chemotherapy remains unclear. The present investigation assessed treatment outcomes in patients with advanced NSCLC who received third-line and higher chemotherapy.

Patients And Methods: This retrospective study included consecutive patients with advanced NSCLC who received at least three lines of systemic chemotherapy.

Results: A total of 72 patients who had received third-line or higher chemotherapy were included in the analysis. The median age of patients was 49 years (range 41-76), and there were 13 (18.1%) women and 59 (81.9%) men. Estimated median survival was 26 months. Moreover, overall survival was significantly longer in patients for whom disease control was achieved after second-line chemotherapy compared to those with disease progression (34 vs. 17 months, respectively). Survival after third-line treatment was significantly longer in the group with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0-1 at the beginning of third-line therapy compared to patients with a status of 2-3.

Conclusions: In patients with advanced stage NSCLC, administration of third-line and higher systemic chemotherapy may be associated with increase in overall survival. Furthermore, greater increases in overall survival were also observed in patients for whom disease control was achieved after second-line therapy and in those with ECOG performance status of 0-1 before third-line treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-1482.146092DOI Listing
December 2016

Treatment with capecitabine + bevacizumab following induction treatment with FOLFIRI + bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

Int J Clin Exp Med 2014 15;7(8):2191-6. Epub 2014 Aug 15.

Department of Medical Oncology, Akdeniz University Antalya, Turkey.

Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor, and it has been found to increase both progression-free survival and overall survival when it is combined with chemotherapeutic agents in the first-line and subsequent treatment of metastatic colorectal carcinoma. The objective of this study was to show the efficacy of maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who responded to treatment with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. The study included patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who received FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab as a first-line treatment. Patients who had objective response with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab treatment after an average period of 6 months received a maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab (capecitabine 2 x 1000 mg/m(2), 1 - 14 days, every 21 days, bevacizumab 7.5 mg/m(2), every 21 days) until disease progression or toxicity. The time to progression on bevacizumab treatment was evaluated. A total of 29 patients (15 male, 14 female) were included. The mean age was 62 years. The mean number of cycles for maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab was 12. The median PFS was 16 ± 3 months, and OS was 42 ± 11 months. PFS and OS were remarkably higher in patients with a complete or near complete response to induction treatment. Fourteen patients (48%) experienced hand-foot syndrome associated with capecitabine plus bevacizumab treatment, without any severe toxicity. Inselected patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma who had a remarkable objective response to FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab treatment, a maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab following FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab until disease progression may be a suitable, effective and tolerable regimen, which requires further studies.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4161566PMC
September 2014

Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor: a rarely seen submucosal lesion of the stomach.

Case Rep Oncol Med 2013 19;2013:328108. Epub 2013 Mar 19.

Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Faculty, Akdeniz University, 07058 Antalya, Turkey.

Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare mesenchymal benign tumor which is generally seen in children and in young adults. It is especially located in the lungs. In histopathological examination, neoplastic fusiform cells originating from a subtype of accessory immune system cells which are called fibroblastic reticulum cells are seen (Kouichi and Youichirou, 2008). Although IMT is histopathologically benign, imaging methods show its tendency for local recurrence and invasion. In most of the cases, it may not be possible to make a distinction whether it is malign or benign. Complete surgical resection is the most important treatment method. In this study, we have discussed the findings of our case having a gastric submucosal located IMT in light of the current literatures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/328108DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3615588PMC
April 2013

Effect of complementary and alternative medicine during radiotherapy on radiation toxicity.

Support Care Cancer 2008 Apr 15;16(4):415-9. Epub 2008 Jan 15.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Antalya, Turkey.

Goal Of Work: To examine the frequency and types of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients undergoing radiotherapy and to analyze the effects these therapies have on the toxicities of radiotherapy.

Materials And Methods: A total of 210 consecutive cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy were included. After radiation therapy, each patient completed a standard questionnaire, and the association between radiation toxicity and complementary and alternative medicine use was analyzed.

Main Results: Among the study population, 44.3% of patients reported using at least one form of complementary and alternative medicine during radiotherapy. The most commonly chosen complementary and alternative medicine was stinging nettle. Complementary and alternative medicine use decreased lower gastrointestinal (F = 3.26, P = .009) and genitourinary toxicities (F = 2.38, P = .043), while it increased laryngeal toxicity (F = 2.63, P = .028). A significant correlation between the type of complementary and alternative medicine used and the degree of these toxicities was not demonstrated.

Conclusions: Use of complementary and alternative medicine among cancer patients during radiation therapy may affect the degree of radiation toxicity. Further randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to determine the benefits and risks of complementary and alternative medicine use during radiation therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-007-0390-0DOI Listing
April 2008

Factors related to truth-telling practice of physicians treating patients with cancer in Turkey.

J Palliat Med 2006 Oct;9(5):1114-9

Department of Medical Oncology, Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Antalya, Turkey.

Background: In the practice of oncology, effective communication between physician and patient is very important. Although many studies have indicated that a large majority of physicians, especially from Western countries, tell the truth about diagnosis and prognosis, little is known about attitudes of physicians in Turkey toward truth-telling.

Objective: In this study, we tried to determine the truth-telling practice of physicians and explore potential related factors with a self-reported questionnaire.

Design: Using a questionnaire, 131 cancer specialists were interviewed during the 15th National Oncology Meeting in April 2003.

Results: The percentage of physicians who never, rarely, generally, and always prefer truthtelling about a cancer diagnosis were 9%, 39%, 45%, and 7%, respectively. In univariate logistic regression analysis for the truth-telling practice, significant variables included "do not tell" requests from family, experiences from medical training and clinical practice, and medical specialty. In the multivariate analysis, "do not tell" requests from relatives and medical training factors retained their significance.

Conclusion: Professional training in breaking bad news is important and is associated with the self-reported truth-telling practices of physicians.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jpm.2006.9.1114DOI Listing
October 2006

"Do not tell": what factors affect relatives' attitudes to honest disclosure of diagnosis to cancer patients?

Support Care Cancer 2004 Jul 16;12(7):497-502. Epub 2004 Apr 16.

Medical Oncology, Internal Medicine, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey.

Disclosure of the diagnosis of cancer to patients is a difficult task for physicians in developing countries. Family members often oppose truth telling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of the "do not tell" attitude in a general population of cancer patients and to explore the factors affecting the attitude of cancer patients' relatives about honest disclosure. Using a questionnaire, relatives of 150 patients with recently diagnosed cancer were interviewed. Of the relatives, 66% did not want the diagnosis to be disclosed. Male gender of the patient, a diagnosis of a non-breast cancer malignancy, the presence of stage IV disease, no previous request for disclosure by the patient, insufficient knowledge of the relative about cancer in general, and stronger religious belief of the relative were associated with greater likelihood of the relative having a "do not tell" attitude in univariate analyses ( P=0.032, P=0.000, P=0.051, P=0.021, P=0.128, and P=0.058, respectively). In a multivariate analysis, the diagnosis of a non-breast cancer malignancy, and insufficient knowledge of the relative about cancer in general retained their significance (exp(B)=14.77, P=0.000; exp(B)=3.04, P=0.01, respectively). Differences among different countries and cultures are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-004-0633-2DOI Listing
July 2004