Publications by authors named "Hajiamin Marjani"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Polypill for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (PolyIran): study design and rationale for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial.

Eur J Prev Cardiol 2015 Dec 17;22(12):1609-17. Epub 2014 Sep 17.

Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Background: The complexity of treatment regimens, costs and pill burden decrease the medication adherence and contribute to shortfall in cardiovascular preventive drug coverage. The polypill, a fixed dose combination pill of established drugs, is expected to increase adherence and reduce the costs whilst preventing major cardiovascular events (MCVE).

Design And Methods: The PolyIran trial is a pragmatic cluster randomized trial nested within the Golestan Cohort Study (GCS). Subjects were randomized to either non-pharmacological preventive interventions alone (minimal care arm) or together with a polypill (polypill arm) comprising hydrochlorothiazide, aspirin, atorvastatin and either enalapril or valsartan. This study benefits from the infrastructure of the primary health care system in Iran and the interventions are delivered by the local auxiliary health workers (Behvarz) to the participants. The primary outcome of the study is the occurrence of first MCVE within five years defined as non-fatal and fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, sudden death, heart failure, coronary artery revascularization procedures, and non-fatal and fatal stroke.

Trial Status: From February 2011 to April 2013, 8410 individuals (236 clusters) attended the eligibility assessment. Of those, 3421 in the polypill arm and 3417 in the minimal care arm were eligible. The study is ongoing.

Conclusion: The infrastructure of GCS and the primary health care system in Iran enabled the conduct of this pragmatic large-scale trial. If the polypill strategy proves effective, it may be implemented to prevent cardiovascular disease in developing countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2047487314550803DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5836725PMC
December 2015

Is opium a real risk factor for esophageal cancer or just a methodological artifact? Hospital and neighborhood controls in case-control studies.

PLoS One 2012 1;7(3):e32711. Epub 2012 Mar 1.

Digestive Disease Research Center, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Control selection is a major challenge in epidemiologic case-control studies. The aim of our study was to evaluate using hospital versus neighborhood control groups in studying risk factors of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).

Methodology/principal Findings: We compared the results of two different case-control studies of ESCC conducted in the same region by a single research group. Case definition and enrollment were the same in the two studies, but control selection differed. In the first study, we selected two age- and sex-matched controls from inpatient subjects in hospitals, while for the second we selected two age- and sex-matched controls from each subject's neighborhood of residence. We used the test of heterogeneity to compare the results of the two studies. We found no significant differences in exposure data for tobacco-related variables such as cigarette smoking, chewing Nass (a tobacco product) and hookah (water pipe) usage, but the frequency of opium usage was significantly different between hospital and neighborhood controls. Consequently, the inference drawn for the association between ESCC and tobacco use did not differ between the studies, but it did for opium use. In the study using neighborhood controls, opium use was associated with a significantly increased risk of ESCC (adjusted OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.17-2.68), while in the study using hospital controls, this was not the case (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.63-1.87). Comparing the prevalence of opium consumption in the two control groups and a cohort enrolled from the same geographic area suggested that the neighborhood controls were more representative of the study base population for this exposure.

Conclusions/significance: Hospital and neighborhood controls did not lead us to the same conclusion for a major hypothesized risk factor for ESCC in this population. Our results show that control group selection is critical in drawing appropriate conclusions in observational studies.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0032711PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3291619PMC
July 2012