Publications by authors named "Hai-Yen Man"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Versicolorin A enhances the genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 in human liver cells by inducing the transactivation of the Ah-receptor.

Food Chem Toxicol 2021 Jul 10;153:112258. Epub 2021 May 10.

Toxalim (Research Centre in Food Toxicology), University of Toulouse, INRAE, ENVT, INP-Purpan, UPS, 31027, Toulouse, France.

Aflatoxins are a group of mycotoxins that have major adverse effects on human health. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most important aflatoxin and a potent carcinogen once converted into a DNA-reactive form by cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP450). AFB1 biosynthesis involves the formation of Versicolorin A (VerA) which shares structural similarities with AFB1 and can be found in contaminated commodities, often co-occurring with AFB1. This study investigated and compared the toxicity of VerA and AFB1, alone or in combination, in HepG2 human liver cells. Our results show that both toxins have similar cytotoxic effects and are genotoxic although, unlike AFB1, the main genotoxic mechanism of VerA does not involve the formation of DNA double-strand breaks. Additionally, we show that VerA activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and significantly induce the expression of the CYP450-1A1 (CYP1A1) while AFB1 did not induce AhR-dependent CYP1A1 activation. Combination of VerA with AFB1 resulted in enhanced genotoxic effects, suggesting that AhR-activation by VerA influences AFB1 genotoxicity by promoting its bioactivation by CYP450s to a highly DNA-reactive metabolite. Our results emphasize the need for expanding the toxicological knowledge regarding mycotoxin biosynthetic precursors to identify those who may pose, directly or indirectly, a threat to human health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2021.112258DOI Listing
July 2021

Induction of AhR transactivation by PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs using a novel human-relevant, high-throughput DR CALUX reporter gene assay.

Chemosphere 2021 Jan 23;263:128086. Epub 2020 Aug 23.

VU Amsterdam, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Animal Ecology, De Boelelaan, 1080HV, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; BioDetection Systems B.V., Science Park 406, 1098XH, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Polychlorinated dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) are highly toxic contaminants that are strictly regulated and monitored in the environment and food to reduce human exposure. Recently, the increasing occurrence of polybrominated dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) in the environment is raising concerns about the impact on human health by the combined exposure to chlorinated and brominated analogues of dioxins. Toxicological properties of PBDD/Fs relative to PCDD/Fs have not been firmly established, and brominated dioxins are not included in routine monitoring programs. In this study, we set out to determine human-relevant congener-specific potency values for a range of brominated and chlorinated dioxin congeners, based on their aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated mode of toxic action. Transactivation of the AhR was measured using dioxin-responsive (DR) CALUX reporter gene assays. Because of known species-differences in dioxin-mediated toxicity, we developed and used a HepG2 human liver cell-based DR human CALUX assay that is a variant of the rodent-based DR CALUX. The assay was found to be highly inducible and stable, with low variations between independent measurements. Using both DR CALUX assays in an automated high-throughput mode we found that overall PBDD/Fs were as potent as PCDD/Fs in inducing AhR transactivation, but congener-specific differences were observed. We also observed species-specific differences in sensitivity and potency when comparing DR human REP values to those obtained in the rat-based DR CALUX. Finally, we observed significant differences between WHO-TEF values and DR human REP values, suggesting that actual WHO-TEF values may underestimate the hazards associated with exposure of humans to dioxins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2020.128086DOI Listing
January 2021

Evaluation of a panel of in vitro methods for assessing thyroid receptor β and transthyretin transporter disrupting activities.

Reprod Toxicol 2019 May 8. Epub 2019 May 8.

BioDetection Systems BV, Science Park 406, 1098XH, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; VU University, Department of Animal Ecology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

We developed a thyroid testing panel to assess endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) capacities to bind either the thyroid receptor β (TRβ) or the thyroid hormones transporter transthyretin (TTR). We first stably transfected a human U2OS cell line with TRβ and a luciferase reporter construct to develop the TRβ CALUX® reporter gene assay to assess chemicals' potential to interact with TRβ. Secondly, we combined a TTR-binding assay with the TRβ CALUX (TTR-TRβ CALUX) and optimized the system to evaluate the competitive properties of EDCs towards T4 for TTR binding. Both systems were evaluated with a range of known thyroid-disrupting compounds. The agonistic/antagonistic TRβ CALUX successfully predicted 9/9 and 9/12 test compounds, respectively. The TTR-TRβ CALUX predicted 9/9 compounds and demonstrated competitive activities when analyzing waste water samples. We concluded that the proposed test battery is a promising screening method able to efficiently generate data on thyroid hormone interferences by chemicals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.reprotox.2019.05.011DOI Listing
May 2019

Incorporation of metabolic enzymes to improve predictivity of reporter gene assay results for estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity.

Reprod Toxicol 2018 01 21;75:40-48. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

BioDetection Systems bv, Science Park 406, 1098XH Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Identification and monitoring of so-called endocrine-disrupting compounds has received ample attention; both the OECD and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) have designed tiered testing approaches, involving in vitro bioassays to prioritize and partly replace traditional animal experiments. Since the estrogen (ER) and androgen (AR) receptor are frequent targets of endocrine disrupting chemicals, bioassays detecting interaction with these receptors have a high potential to be of use in risk assessment of endocrine active compounds. However, in many bioassays in vivo hepatic metabolism is not accounted for, which hampers extrapolation to the in vivo situation. In the present study, we have developed a metabolic module using rat liver S9 as an add-on to human cell-based reporter gene assays. The method was applied to reporter gene assays for detection of (anti-) estrogens and (anti-) androgens, but can be extended to cell-based reporter gene assays covering a variety of endpoints related to endocrine disruption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.reprotox.2017.11.005DOI Listing
January 2018

A high throughput screening system for predicting chemically-induced reproductive organ deformities.

Reprod Toxicol 2015 Aug 18;55:95-103. Epub 2014 Dec 18.

BioDetection Systems BV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

There is a great need for alternative testing methods for reproductive toxicants that are practical, fast, cost-effective and easy to interpret. Previously we followed a pragmatic approach using readily available tests, which was successful in predicting reproductive toxicity of chemicals [13]. This initial battery still contained apical tests and is fairly complex and low in its throughput. The current study aimed to simplify this screening battery using a mechanistic approach and a panel of high throughput CALUX reporter gene assays. A mechanistic approach was taken to validate this high throughput test battery. To this end it was challenged with two preselected sets of chemicals addressing two major apical effect classes relevant in reproductive toxicity. We found selectivity in this battery in that 82% of the compounds inducing reproductive organ deformities were predicted correctly, while for compounds inducing neural tube defects this was the case in 47% only. This is consistent with the mechanisms of toxicity covered in the battery. The most informative assays in the battery were ERalpha CALUX to measure estrogenicity and the AR-anti CALUX assay to measure androgen receptor antagonism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.reprotox.2014.11.011DOI Listing
August 2015

Evaluation of an alternative in vitro test battery for detecting reproductive toxicants in a grouping context.

Reprod Toxicol 2015 Aug 14;55:11-9. Epub 2014 Oct 14.

BioDetection Systems BV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Previously we showed a battery consisting of CALUX transcriptional activation assays, the ReProGlo assay, and the embryonic stem cell test, and zebrafish embryotoxicity assay as 'apical' tests to correctly predict developmental toxicity for 11 out of 12 compounds, and to explain the one false negative [7]. Here we report on applying this battery within the context of grouping and read across, put forward as a potential tool to fill data gaps and avoid animal testing, to distinguish in vivo non- or weak developmental toxicants from potent developmental toxicants within groups of structural analogs. The battery correctly distinguished 2-methylhexanoic acid, monomethyl phthalate, and monobutyltin trichloride as non- or weak developmental toxicants from structurally related developmental toxicants valproic acid, mono-ethylhexyl phthalate, and tributyltin chloride, respectively, and, therefore, holds promise as a biological verification model in grouping and read across approaches. The relevance of toxicokinetic information is indicated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.reprotox.2014.10.003DOI Listing
August 2015

Model steatogenic compounds (amiodarone, valproic acid, and tetracycline) alter lipid metabolism by different mechanisms in mouse liver slices.

PLoS One 2014 29;9(1):e86795. Epub 2014 Jan 29.

Cluster of Bioassays and Toxicology, RIKILT - Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Although drug induced steatosis represents a mild type of hepatotoxicity it can progress into more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Current models used for safety assessment in drug development and chemical risk assessment do not accurately predict steatosis in humans. Therefore, new models need to be developed to screen compounds for steatogenic properties. We have studied the usefulness of mouse precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) as an alternative to animal testing to gain more insight into the mechanisms involved in the steatogenesis. To this end, PCLS were incubated 24 h with the model steatogenic compounds: amiodarone (AMI), valproic acid (VA), and tetracycline (TET). Transcriptome analysis using DNA microarrays was used to identify genes and processes affected by these compounds. AMI and VA upregulated lipid metabolism, whereas processes associated with extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation were downregulated. TET downregulated mitochondrial functions, lipid metabolism, and fibrosis. Furthermore, on the basis of the transcriptomics data it was hypothesized that all three compounds affect peroxisome proliferator activated-receptor (PPAR) signaling. Application of PPAR reporter assays classified AMI and VA as PPARγ and triple PPARα/(β/δ)/γ agonist, respectively, whereas TET had no effect on any of the PPARs. Some of the differentially expressed genes were considered as potential candidate biomarkers to identify PPAR agonists (i.e. AMI and VA) or compounds impairing mitochondrial functions (i.e. TET). Finally, comparison of our findings with publicly available transcriptomics data showed that a number of processes altered in the mouse PCLS was also affected in mouse livers and human primary hepatocytes exposed to known PPAR agonists. Thus mouse PCLS are a valuable model to identify early mechanisms of action of compounds altering lipid metabolism.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0086795PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3906077PMC
September 2014

Induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ)-mediated gene expression by tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) extracts.

J Agric Food Chem 2013 Apr 2;61(14):3419-27. Epub 2013 Apr 2.

Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Since beneficial effects related to tomato consumption partially overlap with those related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation, our aim was to test extracts of tomato fruits and tomato components, including polyphenols and isoprenoids, for their capacity to activate PPARγ using the PPARγ2 CALUX reporter cell line. Thirty tomato compounds were tested; seven carotenoids and three polyphenols induced PPARγ2-mediated luciferase expression. Two extracts of tomato, one containing deglycosylated phenolic compounds and one containing isoprenoids, also induced PPARγ2-mediated expression at physiologically relevant concentrations. Furthermore, enzymatically hydrolyzed extracts of seven tomato varieties all induced PPARγ-mediated expression, with a 1.6-fold difference between the least potent and the most potent variety. The two most potent varieties had high flavonoid content, while the two least potent varieties had low flavonoid content. These data indicate that extracts of tomato are able to induce PPARγ-mediated gene expression in vitro and that some tomato varieties are more potent than others.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf304790aDOI Listing
April 2013

Stable reporter cell lines for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ)-mediated modulation of gene expression.

Anal Biochem 2011 Jul 24;414(1):77-83. Epub 2011 Feb 24.

Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, The Netherlands.

Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) by ligands is associated with beneficial health effects, including anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects. The aim of the current study was to develop luciferase reporter gene assays to enable fast and low-cost measurement of PPARγ agonist and antagonist activity. Two reporter gene assays, PPARγ1 CALUX and PPARγ2 CALUX, were developed by stable transfection of U2OS cells with an expression vector for PPARγ1 or PPARγ2 and a pGL3-3xPPRE-tata-luc or pGL4-3xPPRE-tata-luc reporter construct, respectively. PPARγ1 CALUX and PPARγ2 CALUX cells showed similar concentration-dependent luciferase induction upon exposure to the PPARγ agonists rosiglitazone, troglitazone, pioglitazone, ciglitazone, netoglitazone, and 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2). The potency to induce luciferase decreased in the following order: rosiglitazone>troglitazone=pioglitazone>netoglitazone>ciglitazone. A concentration-dependent decrease in the response to 50nM rosiglitazone was observed on the addition of PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or T0070907 in both PPARγ1 CALUX and PPARγ2 CALUX cells. The PPARα agonists WY14643 and fenofibrate failed to induce luciferase activity, confirming the specificity of these cell lines for PPARγ agonists. In conclusion, PPARγ1 CALUX and PPARγ2 CALUX cells provide a reliable and useful tool to screen (bio)chemicals for PPARγ agonist or antagonist activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ab.2011.02.032DOI Listing
July 2011

Optimization and prevalidation of the in vitro AR CALUX method to test androgenic and antiandrogenic activity of compounds.

Reprod Toxicol 2010 Aug 10;30(1):18-24. Epub 2010 May 10.

BioDetection Systems BV, Science Park 406, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

To date there are no validated methods available to test androgenicity or antiandrogenicity in vitro. A problem with testing androgenicity using reporter genes is the possibility by other steroid receptors than androgen receptors to activate the same reporter gene, thereby lowering selectivity. To avoid this we have established a robust and very selective method, the AR CALUX reporter gene assay, to test androgenic and antiandrogenic activity of compounds in vitro. This assay uses a human U2-OS cell line stably transfected with the human androgen receptor and an androgen receptor responsive reporter gene. We optimized protocols to be used in combination with AR CALUX cells and carried out an in house prevalidation. In addition we successfully transferred this assay to another laboratory, leading to comparable test results with a panel of androgen receptor agonists and antagonists. The assay was able to readily rank a range of chemicals on the basis of their EC50 values. The CALUX assay was found to be selective for androgens and seemed not influenced by signaling through other steroid receptors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.reprotox.2010.04.012DOI Listing
August 2010

Detection of multiple hormonal activities in wastewater effluents and surface water, using a panel of steroid receptor CALUX bioassays.

Environ Sci Technol 2008 Aug;42(15):5814-20

BioDetection Systems B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

It is generally known that there are compounds present in the aquatic environment that can disturb endocrine processes, for example via interaction with the endogenous hormone receptors. Most research so far has focused on compounds that bind to the estrogen and/or androgen receptor, but ligands for other hormone receptors might also be present. In this study, a newly completed panel of human cell derived CALUX reporter gene bioassays was utilized to test water extracts for estrogen (ER), as well as androgen (AR), progesterone (PR), and glucocorticoid (GR) receptor mediated transactivation activity. Effluents from industry, hospital, and municipal sewage treatment plants, as well as tap water and different sources of surface water were tested. The CALUX reporter gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity to known agonists, enabling discrimination between different receptor based endocrine responses present in the aquatic environment. Our results clearly showed the presence of agonistic activity on the ER, as well as on the AR, PR, and GR in the raw and wastewater and surface water extracts. However, no hormone receptor-mediated transactivation was detected in the drinking water or in the blank water. The levels of estrogenic activity were 0.2-0.5 ng E2-equiv/L for surface water and 0.4-1.0 ng E2-equiv/L for municipal effluents, which was consistent with previous studies. Surprisingly, the other hormonal activities were found to be present in similar or much higher levels. Most notably, glucocorticoid-like activity was detected in all samples, at surprisingly high levels ranging from 0.39-1.3 ng Dex-equiv/L in surface water and 11-243 ng Dex-equiv/L in effluents. When regarding the fact that dexamethasone in the GR CALUX bioassay is a factor 12 more potent than the natural hormone cortisol, results expressed as cortisol equivalents would range up to 2900 ng cortisol equiv/L. Further studies are needed to establish the identity of the active compounds and to understand the significance of the level of activities with regard to human and ecotoxicological risks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es702897yDOI Listing
August 2008

Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of a familial duplication of chromosome 13q: a recognizable syndrome.

Am J Med Genet A 2005 Jul;136(1):76-80

Department of Clinical Genetics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

We report on a family with six persons in three generations who have mild mental retardation, behavioral problems, seizures, hearing loss, strabismus, dental anomalies, hypermobility, juvenile hallux valgus, and mild dysmorphic features. Classical cytogenetic analysis showed a partial duplication of chromosome 13q, array comparative genomic hybridization showed the duplication to span approximately 21 Mb, ranging from chromosome band 13q21.31 to 13q31.1. The relatively mild presentation of this large duplication may be explained by the relative paucity of genes in the chromosome region involved. Genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with similar partial 13q duplications are inconsistent. Emerging cytogenetic techniques will allow more reliable genotype-phenotype correlations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.30758DOI Listing
July 2005