Publications by authors named "Hadeel M Almanea"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

PD-L1 Expression Is Associated with Deficient Mismatch Repair and Poor Prognosis in Middle Eastern Colorectal Cancers.

J Pers Med 2021 Jan 26;11(2). Epub 2021 Jan 26.

Human Cancer Genomic Research, Research Center, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia.

Several clinical trials are investigating the use of immune-targeted therapy with Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) inhibitors for colorectal cancer (CRC), with promising results for patients with mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency or metastatic CRC. However, the prognostic significance of PD-L1 expression in CRC is controversial and such data are lacking in CRC from Middle Eastern ethnicity. We carried out this large retrospective study to investigate the prognostic and clinico-pathological impact of PD-L1 expression in Middle Eastern CRC using immunohistochemistry. A total of 1148 CRC were analyzed for PD-L1 expression. High PD-L1 expression was noted in 37.3% (428/1148) cases and was correlated with aggressive clinico-pathological features such as high malignancy grade ( < 0.0001), larger tumor size ( = 0.0007) and mucinous histology ( = 0.0005). Interestingly, PD-L1 expression was significantly higher in patients exhibiting MMR deficiency ( = 0.0169) and mutation ( = 0.0008). Furthermore, the expression of PD-L1 was found to be an independent marker for overall survival (HR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.06 - 1.99; = 0.0200). In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that PD-L1 expression could be a valid biomarker for poor prognosis in Middle Eastern CRC patients. This information can help in decision-making for anti-PD-L1 therapy in Middle Eastern CRC, especially for patients with MMR deficient tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jpm11020073DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7911042PMC
January 2021

Exploiting the Autozygome to Support Previously Published Mendelian Gene-Disease Associations: An Update.

Front Genet 2020 31;11:580484. Epub 2020 Dec 31.

Department of Genetics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

There is a growing interest in standardizing gene-disease associations for the purpose of facilitating the proper classification of variants in the context of Mendelian diseases. One key line of evidence is the independent observation of pathogenic variants in unrelated individuals with similar phenotypes. Here, we expand on our previous effort to exploit the power of autozygosity to produce homozygous pathogenic variants that are otherwise very difficult to encounter in the homozygous state due to their rarity. The identification of such variants in genes with only tentative associations to Mendelian diseases can add to the existing evidence when observed in the context of compatible phenotypes. In this study, we report 20 homozygous variants in 18 genes (, and ) that satisfy the ACMG classification for pathogenic/likely pathogenic if the involved genes had confirmed rather than tentative links to diseases. These variants were selected because they were truncating, founder with compelling segregation or supported by robust functional assays as with the variant that we present its validation using yeast model. Our findings support the previously reported disease associations for these genes and represent a step toward their confirmation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2020.580484DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7806527PMC
December 2020

Clonal Evolution and Timing of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

Cancers (Basel) 2020 Oct 12;12(10). Epub 2020 Oct 12.

Human Cancer Genomic Research, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia.

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide, where ~50% of patients develop metastasis, despite current improved management. Genomic characterisation of metastatic CRC, and elucidating the effects of therapy on the metastatic process, are essential to help guide precision medicine. Multi-region whole-exome sequencing was performed on 191 sampled tumour regions of patient-matched therapy-naïve and treated CRC primary tumours ( = 92 tumour regions) and metastases ( = 99 tumour regions), in 30 patients. Somatic variants were analysed to define the origin, composition, and timing of seeding in the metastatic progression of therapy-naïve and treated metastatic CRC. High concordance, with few genomic differences, was observed between primary CRC and metastases. Most cases supported a late dissemination model, via either monoclonal or polyclonal seeding. Polyclonal seeding appeared more common in therapy-naïve metastases than in treated metastases. Whereby, treatment prompted for the selection of distinct resistant clones, through monoclonal seeding to distant metastatic sites. Overall, this study reinforces the importance of early clinical detection and surgical excision of the CRC tumour, whilst further highlighting the clinical challenges for metastatic CRC with increased intratumour heterogeneity (either due to early dissemination or polyclonal metastatic spread) and the underlying risk of future therapeutic resistance in treated patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers12102938DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7601934PMC
October 2020