Publications by authors named "H Visnes"

9 Publications

Chronic hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and metabolic syndrome are associated with risk of tendon injury.

Scand J Med Sci Sports 2021 May 8. Epub 2021 May 8.

Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Department of Orthopedic Surgery M, Copenhagen University Hospital - Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg and Center for Healthy Aging, Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Tendon injury is a considerable problem affecting both physically active and sedentary people. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between markers for metabolic disorders (hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and metabolic syndrome) and the risk of developing tendon injuries requiring referral to a hospital. The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective study of diabetic and non-diabetic individuals from the Danish general population with different physical activity levels. The cohort was followed for 3 years via national registers with respect to tendon injuries. Data from 5856 individuals (median age 62 years) were included. The overall incidence of tendon injury in both upper and lower extremities that required an out-patient or in-house visit to a hospital was ~5.7/1000 person years. Individuals with elevated HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin) even in the prediabetic range (HbA1c>5.7%) had a ~3 times higher risk of tendon injury in the lower extremities only, as compared to individuals with normal HbA1C levels. Hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol>5 mmol/L) increased risk of tendon injury in the upper extremities by ~1.5 times, and individuals with metabolic syndrome had ~2.5 times higher risk of tendon injury in both upper and lower extremities. In conclusion, these data demonstrate for the first time in a large cohort with different physical activity levels that the indicators for metabolic syndrome are a powerful systemic determinant of tendon injury, and two of its components, hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia, each independently make tendons susceptible for damage and injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.13984DOI Listing
May 2021

How to translate and locally adapt a PROM. Assessment of cross-cultural differential item functioning.

Scand J Med Sci Sports 2021 May 5;31(5):999-1008. Epub 2020 Nov 5.

Section for Sports Traumatology M51, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Translating patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) can alter the meaning of items and undermine the PROM's psychometric properties (quantified as cross-cultural differential item functioning [DIF]). The aim of this paper was to present the theoretical background for PROM translation, adaptation, and cross-cultural validation, and assess how PROMs used in sports medicine research have been translated and adapted. We also assessed DIF for the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) across Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish versions. We conducted a search in PubMed and Scopus to identify the method of translation, adaptation, and validation of PROMs relevant to musculoskeletal research. Additionally, 150 preoperative KOOS questionnaires were obtained from the Scandinavian knee ligament reconstruction registries, and cross-cultural DIF was evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis. There were 392 studies identified, describing the translation of 61 PROMs. Ninety-four percent were performed with forward-backward technique. Forty-nine percent used cognitive interviews to ensure appropriate wording, understandability, and adaptation to the target culture. Only two percent were validated according to modern test theory. No study assessed cross-cultural DIF. One KOOS subscale showed no cross-cultural DIF, two had DIF with respect to some (but not all) items, and thus conversion tables could be constructed, and two KOOS subscales could not be pooled. Most PROM translations are of undocumented quality, despite the common conclusion that they are valid and reliable. Scores from three of five KOOS subscales can be pooled across the Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish versions, but two of these must be adjusted for DIF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.13854DOI Listing
May 2021

Norwegican Cartilage Project - a study protocol for a double-blinded randomized controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture with arthroscopic debridement in focal cartilage defects in the knee.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2016 07 16;17:292. Epub 2016 Jul 16.

Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Focal lesions to the articular cartilage in the knee might have demolishing consequences to the knee. There exists a wide range of possible surgical procedures targeting these injuries, however no significant differences have been found between these procedures. This may support that the improvement is a result of rehabilitation, and not the surgery itself. Arthroscopic microfracture (MF) treatment has gained popularity, and has become the treatment of choice in patients with knee cartilage defects globally. In this study we want to increase knowledge, both clinical and economic, about arthroscopic microfracture (AF) compared to arthroscopic debridement (AD) and physical rehabilitation both in the short run, and in the long run.

Methods/design: To compare arthroscopic microfracture with arthroscopic debridement and physiotherapy for the treatment of focal cartilage lesions in the knee, a long-term, double-blinded, randomized controlled multicenter trial will be conducted. A total of 114 men and non-pregnant women with a symptomatic focal full thickness cartilage lesion in the knee less than 2 cm2 will be included in the study. The two treatment allocations will receive identical rehabilitation, which is made up of 3 phases: accommodation, rehabilitation and return to activity. Follow up is 24 months, where all will be invited to participate in late follow ups after 5 and 10 years. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) knee-related quality of life (QoL) subscore is the primary endpoint. Clinical parameters, questionnaires and radiologic modalities (Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and x-ray) will be used as secondary endpoints.

Discussion: This is an ongoing multicenter study with a high level of evidence to compare arthroscopic microfracture with arthroscopic debridement and physiotherapy for the treatment of isolated symptomatic full thickness cartilage lesions in the knee joint.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02637505 (December 15, 2015).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-016-1156-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4947343PMC
July 2016

Ultrasound characteristics of the patellar and quadriceps tendons among young elite athletes.

Scand J Med Sci Sports 2015 Apr 24;25(2):205-15. Epub 2014 Feb 24.

Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Oslo, Norway; Kysthospitalet i Hagevik, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.

Tendons adapt in response to sports-specific loading, but sometimes develop tendinopathy. If the presence of ultrasound changes like hypoechoic areas and neovascularization in asymptomatic tendons precede (and predict) future tendon problems is unknown. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the relationship between the development of ultrasound changes in the patellar and quadriceps tendons and symptoms of jumper's knee, as well to examine the medium-term effects of intensive training on tendon thickness among adolescent athletes. Elite junior volleyball athletes were followed with semi-annual ultrasound and clinical examinations (average follow-up: 1.7 years). Of the 141 asymptomatic athletes included, 22 athletes (35 patellar tendons) developed jumper's knee. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, a baseline finding of a hypoechoic tendon area (odds ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 9.2) increased the risk of developing symptoms of jumper's knee. Patellar tendon thickness among healthy athletes did not change (Wilk's lambda, P = 0.07) while quadriceps tendon thickness increased (P = 0.001). In conclusion, ultrasound changes at baseline were risk factors for developing symptoms of jumper's knee. Also, among healthy athletes, we observed a 7-11% increase in quadriceps tendon thickness, while there was no increase in patellar tendon thickness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.12191DOI Listing
April 2015

Mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in elite volleyball players with and without patellar tendinopathy.

Br J Sports Med 2013 Sep 5;47(13):862-8. Epub 2013 Jul 5.

Department of Sports Medicine, Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.

Background: Although differences in mechanical properties between symptomatic and healthy tendons have been observed for the Achilles tendon, the impact of tendinopathy on patellar tendon mechanics is not fully documented. The aim of the present case-control study was to assess the mechanical properties of the tendon and jump performance in elite athletes with and without patellar tendinopathy.

Methods: We identified 17 male volleyball players with patellar tendinopathy and 18 healthy matched controls from a 5-year prospective cohort study on junior elite volleyball players. Outcome variables included three measures of maximal vertical jump performance and ultrasound-based assessments of patellar tendon cross-sectional area, stiffness and Young's modulus.

Results: The proximal cross-sectional area of the patellar tendon was significantly larger in the tendinopathic group (133 ± 11 vs 112 ± 9 mm(2), respectively; p < 0.001). Pathological tendons presented lower stiffness (2254 ± 280 vs 2826 ± 603 N/mm, respectively; p = 0.006) and Young's modulus (0.99 ± 0.16 vs 1.17 ± 0.25 GPa, respectively; p = 0.04) than healthy tendons. However, the difference between the countermovement jump height and the squat jump height (3.4 ± 2.2 vs 1.2 ± 1.5 cm, p = 0.005) was significantly higher in the tendinopathic group compared with the control group.

Conclusions: Patellar tendinopathy is associated with a decrease in the mechanical and material properties of the tendon in elite athletes subjected to a high volume of jumping activity. However, compared with their healthy counterparts, tendinopathic volleyball players have a better ability to utilise the stretch-shortening cycle when jumping.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2013-092275DOI Listing
September 2013