Publications by authors named "H Lavanant"

19 Publications

Toxicological impact of organic ultrafine particles (UFPs) in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells at air-liquid interface.

Toxicol In Vitro 2021 Oct 13;78:105258. Epub 2021 Oct 13.

Normandie Univ, UNIROUEN, UNICAEN ABTE, 76000 Rouen, France. Electronic address:

Air pollution has significant health effects worldwide, and airborne particles play a significant role in these effects. Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have an aerodynamic diameter of 0.1 μm or less, can penetrate deep into the respiratory tree, and are more toxic due to their large specific surface area, which should adsorb organic compounds. The aim of this study is to show the toxicological effects of UFPs with high organic content at low dose on BEAS-2B cells through at air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure using a Vitrocell® technology and a miniCAST (Combustion Aerosol Standard) generator. In conjunction with this approach, chemical analysis of particles and gas phase was performed to evaluate the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Chemical analyses confirmed the presence of PAHs in UFPs. With this experimental setup, exposure of the BEAS-2B cells induced neither cytotoxicity nor mitochondrial dysfunction. However, an increase of oxidative stress was observed, as assessed through Nrf2, NQO1, HO-1, CuZnSOD, MnSOD, and Catalase gene expression, together with significant induction of genes related to xenobiotic metabolism CYP1A1 and CYP1B1. Negative regulation of inflammatory genes expression (IL-6 and IL-8) was present three hours after the exposition to the UFPs. Taken together, this experimental approach, using repeatable conditions, should help to clarify the mechanisms by which organic UFPs induce toxicological effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2021.105258DOI Listing
October 2021

Particulate inorganic salts and trace element emissions of a domestic boiler fed with five commercial brands of wood pellets.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2020 May 16;27(15):18221-18231. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Normandie University, UNIROUEN, INSA de Rouen, UMR 6014 CNRS COBRA, 1 rue Tesnière Bât. IRCOF - 76821 Mont Saint Aignan Cedex, Rouen, France.

Pellet stoves arouse a real interest from consumers because they are perceived as a renewable and carbon neutral energy. However, wood combustion can contribute significantly to air pollution, in particular through the emission of particulate matter (PM). In this article, five brands of wood pellets were burnt under optimal combustion conditions and trace element and inorganic salt emission factors (EFs) in PM were determined. Results show that a significant proportion of metals such as lead, zinc, cadmium, and copper initially present in pellets were emitted into the air during combustion with 20 ± 6%, 31 ± 12%, and 19 ± 6% of the initial content respectively for Zn, Pb, and Cd. The median emission factors for Pb, Cu, Cd, As, Zn, and Ni were respectively 188, 86, 9.3, 8.7, 2177, and 3.5 μg kg. The inorganic fraction of the PM emissions was dominated by K, SO, and Cl with respective EFs of 33, 28.7, and 11.2 mg kg. Even taking into account a consumption of 40.1 million tons by 2030 in the EU, the resulting pollution in terms of heavy metal emissions remains minimal in comparison with global emissions in the EU.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-08329-8DOI Listing
May 2020

Collision Cross Sections of Phosphoric Acid Cluster Anions in Helium Measured by Drift Tube Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 2020 Apr 10;31(4):969-981. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

Normandie University, UNIROUEN, INSA Rouen, CNRS, COBRA, 76000 Rouen, France.

In the last years, ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) has improved structural analysis and compound identification by giving access to the collision cross section (CCS). An increasingly wide and accurate database of CCS values is now available but often without assessment of the influence of different instrumental settings on CCS values. Here, we present 75 CCS values in helium (CCS) for phosphoric acid cluster anions [(HPO) - H] with charge state () up to 4-. The CCS values, noted CCS, were obtained with a commercial drift tube ion mobility mass spectrometer, in helium, by applying a classic multifield approach. Phosphoric acid clusters are fragile structures that allow to evaluate the effect of different experimental conditions on the retention of weak bonds and their effect on CCS values. We probed harsh and soft voltage gradients in the electrospray (ESI) source before the IMS and two different voltage gradients in the post-IMS region. The variations in the ion mobility and mass spectra consisted in a change in the distribution of the cluster anions aggregation numbers () and charge states (), with a higher amount of multiply charged species for the soft pre-IMS voltage gradient and a lower proportion of cluster dissociation for soft post-IMS conditions. However, the CCS values did not change with experimental conditions for a given cluster, as long as it stays intact from the IMS to the mass analyzer. The CCS were found in good agreement among 3 to 10 replicated values, with a relative standard deviation between 0.1 and 1.7%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jasms.0c00034DOI Listing
April 2020

Direct Inlet Probe Atmospheric Pressure Photo and Chemical Ionization Coupled to Ultrahigh Resolution Mass Spectrometry for the Description of Lignocellulosic Biomass.

J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 2020 Apr 16;31(4):822-831. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Normandie Université, UNIROUEN, INSA Rouen, CNRS, COBRA, 76000 Rouen, France.

Lignocellulosic biomass, in particular wood, is a complex mixture containing cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and other trace compounds. Chemical analysis of these biomasses, especially lignin components, is a challenge. Lignin is a highly reticulated polymer that is poorly soluble and usually requires chemical, enzymatic, or thermal degradation for its analysis. Here, we studied the thermal degradation of lignocellulosic biomass using a direct insertion probe (DIP). The DIP was used with two ionization sources: atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) coupled to ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry. Beech lignocellulosic biomass samples were used to develop the DIP-APCI/APPI methodology. Two other wood species (maple and oak) were analyzed after optimization of DIP parameters. The two ionization sources were compared at first and showed different responses toward beech samples, according to the source specificity. APPI was more specific to lignin degradation compounds, whereas APCI covered a larger variety of oxygenated compounds, e.g., fatty acids and polyphenolics compounds, in addition to lignin degradation products. The study of the thermodesorption profile gave information on the different steps of lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis. The comparison of the three feed sample types (oak, maple, and beech), using principal component analysis (PCA) with DIP-APCI experiments, showed molecular level differences between beech wood pellets and the two other wood species (maple and oak).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jasms.9b00091DOI Listing
April 2020

A calibration framework for the determination of accurate collision cross sections of polyanions using polyoxometalate standards.

Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 2018 Oct;32(19):1703-1710

Normandie Univ, UNIROUEN, INSA Rouen, CNRS, COBRA, 76000, Rouen, France.

Rationale: Polyoxometalates (POMs) are remarkable oxo-clusters forming compact highly charged anions. We measured their collision cross sections (CCS) in N with drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS). These values were then used to calibrate a traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) device and the accuracy of the calibration was tested.

Methods: Six POM standards were analyzed by DTIM-MS (Tofwerk, Thun, Switzerland) at different voltages to determine absolute CCS (N ) values. Five POM compounds (Lindqvist TBA Mo O decatungstate TBA W O Keggin TBA PMo O ; TBA PW O and Dawson TBA P W O ) were used for the calibration of the TWIM-MS instrument (Synapt G2 HDMS, Waters, Manchester, UK) and a sixth Dawson POM, TBA P Nb W O , was used to compare the accuracy of the calibrations with POM or with polyalanine and dextran reference ions.

Results: We determined 45 CCS (N ) values at 30°C or 60°C. Fourteen CCS (N ) values at 30°C were used to perform calibration of the TWIMS instrument. Better correlations were observed than when CCS values in helium from the literature were used. The accuracy tests on six ions of Dawson POM TBA P Nb W O led to relative errors below 3.1% while relative errors of 3.6% to 10.1% were observed when calibration was performed with polyalanine and dextran reference ions.

Conclusions: Our novel calibration strategy for determination of CCS values of multiply negatively charged ions on TWIM-MS devices based on CCS (N ) of standard POM structures covered a wider range of CCS and improved the accuracy to 2.1% relative error on average compared with 6.9% using polyalanine and dextran calibration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rcm.8230DOI Listing
October 2018
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