Publications by authors named "H Hendriks"

390 Publications

Monitoring and risk assessment of hazardous chemicals in toy-slime and putty in the Netherlands.

Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2021 Jul 4;125:105000. Epub 2021 Jul 4.

Office for Risk Assessment & Research, The Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA), the Netherlands. Electronic address:

In 2019, the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority performed a market surveillance for toy-slime (23 samples) and putty (16 samples). For 35% of the toy-slimes and 13% of the putties, the migration of boron exceeded the European legal limit of 300 and 1200 mg/kg respectively. In 36% of the toy samples, methylisothiazolinone (MI) and chloromethylisothiazolinone (CMI) were detected in levels up to 25 and 38 mg/kg, respectively, much higher than the European legal limit for aqueous toys intended for children younger than three. 59% of the toys contained other preservatives such as 2-phenoxyethanol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and parabens. In 2 toy-slimes and 2 putties N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA) was found in amounts up to 2.3 mg/kg. A risk assessment was performed for boron and NDELA. The estimated exposure to boron did not exceed the health based guidance value. The estimated exposure to NDELA from 2 toy-slimes may pose a health risk. For 2 putties the estimated exposure to NDELA was somewhat lower, but health risks could not be excluded. The presence of isothiazolinones may lead to skin sensitisation. It is recommended to extend the legal limit for NDELA, MI and CMI in finger-paint and labelling requirements to other aqueous toys.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yrtph.2021.105000DOI Listing
July 2021

The interpersonal effects of distinct emotions in online reviews.

Cogn Emot 2021 Jun 30:1-24. Epub 2021 Jun 30.

Amsterdam School of Communication Research, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Emotional expressions in online reviews affect reviews' informative value. By comparing high and low arousal emotions with a negative and positive valence, the current research demonstrates that the effects of emotional expressions in online reviews are determined not by the level of arousal, but by the perceived rationality of the reviewer and the perceived appropriateness of the emotional expression. In a lab experiment ( = 242) among university students, and an online experiment ( = 252) on Prolific Academic involving native English speakers, participants read an online restaurant review with the negative emotions anger, disappointment, or disgust, or with the positive emotions happiness, excitement, or contentment. Results showed that readers of online reviews considered expressions of anger more inappropriate than expressions of disappointment or disgust; this led them to judge the reviewer as more irrational, which decreased the informative value of the review. As a consequence, angry reviews led to less negative restaurant evaluations and stronger intentions to visit the restaurant than reviews expressing disappointment or disgust. We found no differences between contentment and happiness (Study 1), or between contentment and excitement (Study 2). Our findings underscore the importance of studying the effects of discrete emotions in online reviews.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2021.1947199DOI Listing
June 2021

A Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study of College Students' Alcohol and Abstinence Displays on Social Media.

J Adolesc Health 2021 May 27. Epub 2021 May 27.

Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.

Purpose: The past decade has seen tremendous growth in research focused on understanding college students' alcohol-related social media displays. However, longitudinal studies remain rare. The purpose of this 5-year study was to describe alcohol and abstinence display patterns on Facebook.

Methods: This prospective longitudinal cohort study recruited incoming 17- to 19-year-old college students from two universities upon entering college. Trained coders evaluated Facebook profiles monthly over five years to identify alcohol and abstinence displays. Alcohol displays were further categorized as general alcohol use or intoxication/problem drinking references. Analyses included multivariate negative binomial regression.

Results: Among 338 participants recruited (mean age = 18.4, SD = .6), 56.1% were female, 74.8% were Caucasian, and 58.8% were from the Midwest college. General alcohol use references were most common in the spring semester of the third year (mean = 3.9 displays; 95% CI: 3.21-4.73), these often included references to a "21 run." Intoxication/problem drinking references were most common in spring semester of the first year (mean = .79 displays, 95% confidence interval: .56-1.10) and second year of college (mean = .77 displays, 95% confidence interval: .54-1.11). There were no gender differences associated with alcohol displays at any time point. Abstinence displays were rare and declined in frequency to a low of four total displays in year 5.

Conclusions: This 5-year study is the first to document patterns of alcohol and abstinence displays throughout the undergraduate experience. Findings may inform planning targeted interventions by time point, or longitudinal studies of other substances or on different platforms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2021.01.027DOI Listing
May 2021

Running or crossing? Children's expression of voluntary motion in English, German, and French.

J Child Lang 2021 Apr 22:1-24. Epub 2021 Apr 22.

University of Cambridge, UK.

Much research has focused on the expression of voluntary motion (Slobin, 2004; Talmy, 2000). The present study contributes to this body of research by comparing how children (three to ten years) and adults narrated short, animated cartoons in English and German (satellite-framed languages) vs. French (verb-framed). The cartoons showed agents displacing themselves in variable Manners along different Paths (Path saliency and variance were specifically manipulated in four item types). Results show an increase with age across languages in how much information participants expressed. However, at all ages, more motion information was encoded in English and German than in French. Furthermore, language-specific features impacted the content and its organization within utterances in discourse, showing more variation within and across Path types in French than in the satellite-framed languages, resulting in later achievement of adult-like descriptions in this language. The discussion highlights the joint impact of cognitive and typological features on language development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0305000921000271DOI Listing
April 2021

The Intervening Role of Conversational Frequency and Valence in a School-Based Health Intervention.

Health Commun 2021 Mar 31:1-10. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Amsterdam School of Communication Research, University of Amsterdam.

School-based health interventions are potentially an effective method to communicate health messages to adolescents. Unfortunately, effectiveness of such interventions is limited. Research in other contexts has shown that interpersonal communication can influence the effectiveness of health programs, but this has not been thoroughly tested for school-based health interventions. Therefore, our study investigated interpersonal communication (i.e., conversational valence and frequency) in a school-based intervention context. We used a three-wave randomized-controlled trial with 1056 students to study three aims. The first aim was to investigate the influence of a health intervention on conversational frequency and valence about drinking, snacking, and exercising. Our second aim was to investigate the influence of conversational frequency and valence on (predictors of) drinking, snacking, and exercising. Our third aim was to investigate whether the health intervention indirectly influenced the program outcomes through conversational frequency and valence. Findings showed that conversational frequency and valence were related to (predictors of) the three behaviors. Additionally, findings showed that the intervention did not influence conversational frequency and valence. Accordingly, findings showed no indirect influence of the intervention on program outcomes through conversational frequency and valence. Our findings show the potential of interpersonal communication for health behaviors and predictors; however, they also stress the importance of a health intervention to properly influence interpersonal communication. If health interventions can successfully influence interpersonal communication, intervention effectiveness can be improved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2021.1909245DOI Listing
March 2021
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