Publications by authors named "H Charles Vogely"

42 Publications

The EBJIS definition of periprosthetic joint infection.

Bone Joint J 2021 Jan;103-B(1):18-25

Orthopaedic Hospital Valdoltra, Ankaran, Slovenia.

Aims: The diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be difficult. All current diagnostic tests have problems with accuracy and interpretation of results. Many new tests have been proposed, but there is no consensus on the place of many of these in the diagnostic pathway. Previous attempts to develop a definition of PJI have not been universally accepted and there remains no reference standard definition.

Methods: This paper reports the outcome of a project developed by the European Bone and Joint Infection Society (EBJIS), and supported by the Musculoskeletal Infection Society (MSIS) and the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) Study Group for Implant-Associated Infections (ESGIAI). It comprised a comprehensive review of the literature, open discussion with Society members and conference delegates, and an expert panel assessment of the results to produce the final guidance.

Results: This process evolved a three-level approach to the diagnostic continuum, resulting in a definition set and guidance, which has been fully endorsed by EBJIS, MSIS, and ESGIAI.

Conclusion: The definition presents a novel three-level approach to diagnosis, based on the most robust evidence, which will be useful to clinicians in daily practice. Cite this article: 2021;103-B(1):18-25.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1302/0301-620X.103B1.BJJ-2020-1381.R1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7954183PMC
January 2021

Toward Antibacterial Coatings for Personalized Implants.

ACS Biomater Sci Eng 2020 10 10;6(10):5486-5492. Epub 2020 Sep 10.

Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht 3584 CX, The Netherlands.

The complex reconstructive surgeries for which patient-specific orthopedic, maxillofacial, or dental implants are used often necessitate wounds that are open for a considerable amount of time. Unsurprisingly, this allows bacteria to establish implant-associated infection, despite the scrupulous sterilization efforts made during surgery. Here, we developed a prophylactic bactericidal coating via electrophoretic deposition technology for two 3D-printed porous titanium implant designs. The surface characteristics, antibiotic release behavior, antibacterial properties, and impact on osteoblast cell proliferation of the optimized coatings were investigated. The results unequivocally confirmed the biofunctionality of the implants in vitro. This study reveals a new avenue for future antibacterial patient-specific implants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsbiomaterials.0c00683DOI Listing
October 2020

Treating infections with ionizing radiation: a historical perspective and emerging techniques.

Antimicrob Resist Infect Control 2020 07 31;9(1):121. Epub 2020 Jul 31.

Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: Widespread use and misuse of antibiotics have led to a dramatic increase in the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, while the discovery and development of new antibiotics is declining. This has made certain implant-associated infections such as periprosthetic joint infections, where a biofilm is formed, very difficult to treat. Alternative treatment modalities are needed to treat these types of infections in the future. One candidate that has been used extensively in the past, is the use of ionizing radiation. This review aims to provide a historical overview and future perspective of radiation therapy in infectious diseases with a focus on orthopedic infections.

Methods: A systematic search strategy was designed to select studies that used radiation as treatment for bacterial or fungal infections. A total of 216 potentially relevant full-text publications were independently reviewed, of which 182 focused on external radiation and 34 on internal radiation. Due to the large number of studies, several topics were chosen. The main advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and implications of radiation treatment for infections were discussed.

Results: In the pre-antibiotic era, high mortality rates were seen in different infections such as pneumonia, gas gangrene and otitis media. In some cases, external radiation therapy decreased the mortality significantly but long-term follow-up of the patients was often not performed so long term radiation effects, as well as potential increased risk of malignancies could not be investigated. Internal radiation using alpha and beta emitting radionuclides show great promise in treating fungal and bacterial infections when combined with selective targeting through antibodies, thus minimizing possible collateral damage to healthy tissue.

Conclusion: The novel prospects of radiation treatment strategies against planktonic and biofilm-related microbial infections seem feasible and are worth investigating further. However, potential risks involving radiation treatment must be considered in each individual patient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13756-020-00775-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7393726PMC
July 2020

Bactericidal coating to prevent early and delayed implant-related infections.

J Control Release 2020 10 21;326:38-52. Epub 2020 Jun 21.

Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

The occurrence of an implant-associated infection (IAI) with the formation of a persisting bacterial biofilm remains a major risk following orthopedic biomaterial implantation. Yet, progress in the fabrication of tunable and durable implant coatings with sufficient bactericidal activity to prevent IAI has been limited. Here, an electrospun composite coating was optimized for the combinatorial and sustained delivery of antibiotics. Antibiotics-laden poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly`1q`(lactic-co glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers were electrospun onto lattice structured titanium (Ti) implants. In order to achieve tunable and independent delivery of vancomycin (Van) and rifampicin (Rif), we investigated the influence of the specific drug-polymer interaction and the nanofiber coating composition on the drug release profile and durability of the polymer-Ti interface. We found that a bi-layered nanofiber structure, produced by electrospinning of an inner layer of [PCL/Van] and an outer layer of [PLGA/Rif], yielded the optimal combinatorial drug release profile. This resulted in markedly enhanced bactericidal activity against planktonic and adherent Staphylococcus aureus for 6 weeks as compared to single drug delivery. Moreover, after 6 weeks, synergistic bacterial killing was observed as a result of sustained Van and Rif release. The application of a nanofiber-filled lattice structure successfully prevented the delamination of the multi-layer coating after press-fit cadaveric bone implantation. This new lattice design, in conjunction with the multi-layer nanofiber structure, can be applied to develop tunable and durable coatings for various metallic implantable devices. This is particularly appealing to tune the release of multiple antimicrobial agents over a period of weeks to prevent early and delayed onset IAI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2020.06.014DOI Listing
October 2020