Publications by authors named "Hélène Antoine-Poirel"

10 Publications

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The CADM1 tumor suppressor gene is a major candidate gene in MDS with deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11.

Blood Adv 2021 Oct 12. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels, Belgium.

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic stem-cell disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis leading to peripheral cytopenias and in a substantial proportion of cases to acute myeloid leukemia. The deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11, del(11q), is a rare but recurrent clonal event in MDS. Here, we detail the largest series of 113 cases of MDS and myelodysplastic syndromes/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) harboring a del(11q) analyzed at clinical, cytological, cytogenetic and molecular levels. Female predominance, a survival prognosis similar to other MDS, a low monocyte count and dysmegakaryopoiesis were the specific clinical and cytological features of del(11q) MDS. In most cases, del(11q) was isolated, primary and interstitial encompassing the 11q22-23 region containing ATM, KMT2A and CBL genes. The common deleted region at 11q23.2 is centered on an intergenic region between CADM1 (also known as TSLC1, Tumour Suppressor in Lung Cancer 1) and NXPE2. CADM1 was expressed in all myeloid cells analyzed in contrast to NXPE2. At the functional level, the deletion of Cadm1 in murine Lineage-Sca1+Kit+ cells modifies the lymphoid to myeloid ratio in bone marrow although not altering their multi-lineage hematopoietic reconstitution potential after syngenic transplantation. Together with the frequent simultaneous deletions of KMT2A, ATM and CBL and mutations of ASXL1, SF3B1 and CBL, we show that CADM1 may be important in the physiopathology of the del(11q) MDS, extending its role as tumor-suppressor gene from solid tumors to hematopoietic malignancies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2021005311DOI Listing
October 2021

Functional classification of ATM variants in ataxia-telangiectasia patients.

Hum Mutat 2019 10 17;40(10):1713-1730. Epub 2019 May 17.

CHU de Nancy, Service de Neurologie, Nancy, France.

Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive disorder caused by biallelic pathogenic variants of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). This disease is characterized by progressive ataxia, telangiectasia, immune deficiency, predisposition to malignancies, and radiosensitivity. However, hypomorphic variants may be discovered associated with very atypical phenotypes, raising the importance of evaluating their pathogenic effects. In this study, multiple functional analyses were performed on lymphoblastoid cell lines from 36 patients, comprising 49 ATM variants, 24 being of uncertain significance. Thirteen patients with atypical phenotype and presumably hypomorphic variants were of particular interest to test strength of functional analyses and to highlight discrepancies with typical patients. Western-blot combined with transcript analyses allowed the identification of one missing variant, confirmed suspected splice defects and revealed unsuspected minor transcripts. Subcellular localization analyses confirmed the low level and abnormal cytoplasmic localization of ATM for most A-T cell lines. Interestingly, atypical patients had lower kinase defect and less altered cell-cycle distribution after genotoxic stress than typical patients. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the pathogenic effects of the 49 variants, highlighted the strength of KAP1 phosphorylation test for pathogenicity assessment and allowed the establishment of the Ataxia-TeLangiectasia Atypical Score to predict atypical phenotype. Altogether, we propose strategies for ATM variant detection and classification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23778DOI Listing
October 2019

Cytogenetics in the management of lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders in adults and children: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH).

Ann Biol Clin (Paris) 2016 Oct;74(5):568-587

Centre de génétique humaine, Cliniques universitaires St-Luc & de Duve Institute - Université catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles, Belgique.

Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders include a high number of heterogeneous entities, described in the 2008 WHO classification. This classification reflects the crucial role of a multidisciplinary approach which integrates cytogenetic results both for the notion of clonality and for differential diagnosis between these entities. The prognostic impact of some cytogenetic abnormalities or genome complexity is also confirmed for many of these entities. Novel provisional entities have been described, such as BCLU (B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma) for which karyotype is critical to distinguish BCLU from Burkitt's lymphoma. The karyotype can be established from any tumour or liquid infiltrated by lymphoma cells. Recent adaptations of technics for cellular cultures according to the subtype of known (or suspected) lymphoma have significantly improved the percentage of informative karyotypes. Conventional karyotypes remain the best technical approach recommended for most of these subtypes. Interphase and/or metaphase FISH also represents a solid and rapid approach, because of the significant number of recurrent (sometimes specific) rearrangements of these entities. Next generation sequencing technologies contribute to enrich genomic data and substantially improve the understanding of oncogenic mechanisms underlying these lymphoid malignancies. Some molecular biomarkers are already part of the diagnostic process (for example, somatic mutation of MYD88 in Waldenström disease) thus reinforcing the essential principle of a multidisciplinary approach for the diagnosis of all the mature lymphoid malignancies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/abc.2016.1179DOI Listing
October 2016

Overexpression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and genomic gain of the NQO1 locus modulates breast cancer cell sensitivity to quinones.

Life Sci 2016 Jan 10;145:57-65. Epub 2015 Dec 10.

Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Brussels, Belgium; Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Arturo Prat, Iquique, Chile. Electronic address:

Aims: Alterations in the expression of antioxidant enzymes are associated with changes in cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs (menadione and β-lapachone). Mechanisms of acquisition of resistance to pro-oxidant drugs were investigated using a model of oxidative stress-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells (Resox cells).

Main Methods: FISH experiments were performed in tumor biopsy and breast cancer cells to characterize the pattern of the NQO1 gene. SNP-arrays were conducted to detect chromosomal imbalances. Finally, the importance of NQO1 overexpression in the putative acquisition of either drug resistance or an increased sensitivity to quinones by cancer cells was investigated by immunoblotting and cytotoxicity assays.

Key Findings: Genomic gain of the chromosomal band 16q22 was detected in Resox cells compared to parental breast cancer MCF-7 cells and normal human mammary epithelial 250MK cells. This genomic gain was associated with amplification of the NQO1 gene in one tumor biopsy as well as in breast cancer cell lines. Using different breast cell models, we found that NQO1 overexpression was a main determinant for a potential chemotherapy resistance or an increased sensitivity to quinone-bearing compounds.

Significance: Because NQO1 is frequently modified in tumors at genomic and transcriptomic levels, the impact of NQO1 modulation on breast cancer cell sensitivity places NQO1 as a potential link between cancer redox alterations and resistance to chemotherapy. Thus, the NQO1 gene copy number and NQO1 activity should be considered when quinone-bearing molecules are being utilized as potential drugs against breast tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2015.12.017DOI Listing
January 2016

Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Cell Therapy: Safety and Feasibility in Different "Hospital Exemption" Clinical Applications.

PLoS One 2015 20;10(10):e0139566. Epub 2015 Oct 20.

Endocrine Cell Therapy, Centre of Tissular and Cellular Therapy, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels, Belgium.

Based on immunomodulatory, osteogenic, and pro-angiogenic properties of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), this study aims to assess the safety and efficacy of ASC-derived cell therapies for clinical indications. Two autologous ASC-derived products were proposed to 17 patients who had not experienced any success with conventional therapies: (1) a scaffold-free osteogenic three-dimensional graft for the treatment of bone non-union and (2) a biological dressing for dermal reconstruction of non-healing chronic wounds. Safety was studied using the quality control of the final product (genetic stability, microbiological/mycoplasma/endotoxin contamination) and the in vivo evaluation of adverse events after transplantation. Feasibility was assessed by the ability to reproducibly obtain the final ASC-based product with specific characteristics, the time necessary for graft manufacturing, the capacity to produce enough material to treat the lesion, the surgical handling of the graft, and the ability to manufacture the graft in line with hospital exemption regulations. For 16 patients (one patient did not undergo grafting because of spontaneous bone healing), in-process controls found no microbiological/mycoplasma/endotoxin contamination, no obvious deleterious genomic anomalies, and optimal ASC purity. Each type of graft was reproducibly obtained without significant delay for implantation and surgical handling was always according to the surgical procedure and the implantation site. No serious adverse events were noted for up to 54 months. We demonstrated that autologous ASC transplantation can be considered a safe and feasible therapy tool for extreme clinical indications of ASC properties and physiopathology of disease.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0139566PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4615620PMC
June 2016

Somatic uniparental isodisomy explains multifocality of glomuvenous malformations.

Am J Hum Genet 2013 Feb 31;92(2):188-96. Epub 2013 Jan 31.

Laboratory of Human Molecular Genetics, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.

Inherited vascular malformations are commonly autosomal dominantly inherited with high, but incomplete, penetrance; they often present as multiple lesions. We hypothesized that Knudson's two-hit model could explain this multifocality and partial penetrance. We performed a systematic analysis of inherited glomuvenous malformations (GVMs) by using multiple approaches, including a sensitive allele-specific pairwise SNP-chip method. Overall, we identified 16 somatic mutations, most of which were not intragenic but were cases of acquired uniparental isodisomy (aUPID) involving chromosome 1p. The breakpoint of each aUPID is located in an A- and T-rich, high-DNA-flexibility region (1p13.1-1p12). This region corresponds to a possible new fragile site. Occurrences of these mutations render the inherited glomulin variant in 1p22.1 homozygous in the affected tissues without loss of genetic material. This finding demonstrates that a double hit is needed to trigger formation of a GVM. It also suggests that somatic UPID, only detectable by sensitive pairwise analysis in heterogeneous tissues, might be a common phenomenon in human cells. Thus, aUPID might play a role in the pathogenesis of various nonmalignant disorders and might explain local impaired function and/or clinical variability. Furthermore, these data suggest that pairwise analysis of blood and tissue, even on heterogeneous tissue, can be used for localizing double-hit mutations in disease-causing genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.12.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3567282PMC
February 2013

Orientation-specific signalling by thrombopoietin receptor dimers.

EMBO J 2011 Sep 2;30(21):4398-413. Epub 2011 Sep 2.

Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Brussels, Belgium.

Ligand binding to the thrombopoietin receptor is thought to stabilize an active receptor dimer that regulates megakaryocyte differentiation and platelet formation, as well as haematopoietic stem cell renewal. By fusing a dimeric coiled coil in all seven possible orientations to the thrombopoietin receptor transmembrane (TM)-cytoplasmic domains, we show that specific biological effects and in vivo phenotypes are imparted by distinct dimeric orientations, which can be visualized by cysteine mutagenesis and crosslinking. Using functional assays and computational searches, we identify one orientation that represents the inactive dimeric state and another similar to a physiologically activated receptor. Several other dimeric orientations are identified that induce proliferation and in vivo myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic disorders, indicating the receptor can signal from several dimeric interfaces. The set of dimeric thrombopoietin receptors with different TM orientations may offer new insights into the activation of distinct signalling pathways by a single receptor and suggests that subtle differences in cytokine receptor dimerization provide a new layer of signalling regulation that is relevant for disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/emboj.2011.315DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3230373PMC
September 2011

EVI1-mediated down regulation of MIR449A is essential for the survival of EVI1 positive leukaemic cells.

Br J Haematol 2011 Aug 14;154(3):337-48. Epub 2011 May 14.

Centre for Medical Genetics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.

Chromosomal rearrangements involving the MECOM (MDS1 and EVI1 complex) locus are recurrent genetic events in myeloid leukaemia and are associated with poor prognosis. In this study, we assessed the role of MECOM locus protein EVI1 in the transcriptional regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in the leukaemic phenotype. For this, we profiled expression of 366 miRNAs in 38 MECOM-rearranged patient samples, normal bone marrow controls and MECOM (EVI1) knock down/re-expression models. Cross-comparison of these miRNA expression profiling data showed that MECOM rearranged leukaemias are characterized by down regulation of MIR449A. Reconstitution of MIR449A expression in MECOM-rearranged cell line models induced apoptosis resulting in a strong decrease in cell viability. These effects might be mediated in part by MIR449A regulation of NOTCH1 and BCL2, which are shown here to be bona fide MIR449A targets. Finally, we confirmed that MIR449A repression is mediated through direct promoter occupation of the EVI1 transcriptional repressor. In conclusion, this study reveals MIR449A as a crucial direct target of the MECOM locus protein EVI1 involved in the pathogenesis of MECOM-rearranged leukaemias and unravels NOTCH1 and BCL2 as important novel targets of MIR449A. This EVI1-MIR449A-NOTCH1/BCL2 regulatory axis might open new possibilities for the development of therapeutic strategies in this poor prognostic leukaemia subgroup.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2141.2011.08737.xDOI Listing
August 2011

Wide diversity of PAX5 alterations in B-ALL: a Groupe Francophone de Cytogenetique Hematologique study.

Blood 2010 Apr 16;115(15):3089-97. Epub 2010 Feb 16.

Inserm, U563, 31024 Toulouse, France.

PAX5 is the main target of somatic mutations in acute B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). We analyzed 153 adult and child B-ALL harboring karyotypic abnormalities at chromosome 9p, to determine the frequency and the nature of PAX5 alterations. We found PAX5 internal rearrangements in 21% of the cases. To isolate fusion partners, we used classic and innovative techniques (rolling circle amplification-rapid amplification of cDNA ends) and single nucleotide polymorphism-comparative genomic hybridization arrays. Recurrent and novel fusion partners were identified, including NCoR1, DACH2, GOLGA6, and TAOK1 genes showing the high variability of the partners. We noted that half the fusion genes can give rise to truncated PAX5 proteins. Furthermore, malignant cells carrying PAX5 fusion genes displayed a simple karyotype. These data strongly suggest that PAX5 fusion genes are early players in leukemogenesis. In addition, PAX5 deletion was observed in 60% of B-ALL with 9p alterations. Contrary to cases with PAX5 fusions, deletions were associated with complex karyotypes and common recurrent translocations. This supports the hypothesis of the secondary nature of the deletion. Our data shed more light on the high variability of PAX5 alterations in B-ALL. Therefore, it is probable that gene fusions occur early, whereas deletions should be regarded as a late/secondary event.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2009-07-234229DOI Listing
April 2010
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