Publications by authors named "Héctor Estrada-Medina"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Seasonal shifts of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Cocos nucifera roots in Yucatan, Mexico.

Mycorrhiza 2020 May 2;30(2-3):269-283. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Unidad de Biotecnología, Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico.

The diversity and community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with coconut (Cocos nucifera) roots was evaluated by next generation sequencing (NGS) using partial sequences of the 18S rDNA gene and by spore isolation and morphological identification from rhizosphere soil. Root samples from six different Green Dwarf coconut plantations and from one organic plantation surrounded by tropical dry forest along the coastal sand dunes in Yucatan, Mexico, were collected during the rainy and dry seasons. In total, 14 root samples were sequenced with the Illumina MiSeq platform. Additionally, soil samples from the dry season were collected to identify AMF glomerospores. Based on a 95-97% similarity, a total of 36 virtual taxa (VT) belonging to nine genera were identified including one new genus-like clade. Glomus was the most abundant genus, both in number of VT and sequences. The comparison of dry and rainy season samples revealed differences in the richness and composition of AMF communities colonizing coconut roots. Our study shows that the main AMF genera associated with coconut tree roots in all samples were Glomus, Sclerocystis, Rhizophagus, Redeckera, and Diversispora. Based on glomerospore morphology, 22 morphospecies were recorded among which 14 were identified to species. Sclerocystis sinuosa, Sclerocystis rubiformis, Glomus microaggregatum, and Acaulospora scrobiculata were dominant in field rhizosphere samples. This is the first assessment of the composition of AMF communities colonizing coconut roots in rainy and dry seasons. It is of importance for selection of AMF species to investigate for their potential application in sustainable agriculture of coconut.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00572-020-00944-0DOI Listing
May 2020

Yucatán in black and red: Linking edaphic analysis and pyrosequencing-based assessment of bacterial and fungal community structures in the two main kinds of soil of Yucatán State.

Microbiol Res 2016 Jul-Aug;188-189:23-33. Epub 2016 Apr 22.

Unidad de Biotecnología, Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico. Electronic address:

Yucatán State is dominated by two kinds of soil, named "Black Leptosol" and "Red Leptosol", which are interwoven across the State. In this work, we analyzed the relation between the edaphic characteristics and the bacterial and fungal community structures in these two kinds of Leptosol. The results revealed that Black Leptosol (BlaS) had a higher content of calcium carbonates, organic matter, nitrogen, and phosphorus than Red Leptosol (RedS). The most outstanding difference in the bacterial community structure between BlaS and RedS was that while in BlaS Actinobacteria was the most abundant phylum (43.7%), followed by Acidobacteria (26.9%) and Proteobacteria (23.6%), in RedS the bacterial community was strongly dominated by Acidobacteria (83%). Two fungal phyla were identified in both kinds of soil; Ascomycota, with 77% in BlaS and 56% in RedS, and Basidiomycota, with 22% in RedS and only 0.67% in BlaS. The most relevant difference between the two fungal communities was that excepting for Fusarium sp., all the species they had were different. Thus, in contrast with bacterial communities, where most of the major OTUs were present in both kinds of soil, fungal communities appeared to be unique to each kind of Leptosol.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micres.2016.04.007DOI Listing
March 2017

Water source partitioning among trees growing on shallow karst soils in a seasonally dry tropical climate.

Oecologia 2007 May 10;152(1):26-36. Epub 2007 Jan 10.

Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.

The sources of water used by woody vegetation growing on karst soils in seasonally dry tropical regions are little known. In northern Yucatan (Mexico), trees withstand 4-6 months of annual drought in spite of the small water storage capacity of the shallow karst soil. We hypothesized that adult evergreen trees in Yucatan tap the aquifer for a reliable supply of water during the prolonged dry season. The naturally occurring concentration gradients in oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes in soil, bedrock, groundwater and plant stem water were used to determine the sources of water used by native evergreen and drought-deciduous tree species. While the trees studied grew over a permanent water table (9-20 m depth), pit excavation showed that roots were largely restricted to the upper 2 m of the soil/bedrock profile. At the peak of the dry season, the delta(18)O signatures of potential water sources for the vegetation ranged from 4.1 +/- 1.1 per thousand in topsoil to -4.3 +/- 0.1 per thousand in groundwater. The delta(18)O values of tree stem water ranged from -2.8 +/- 0.3 per thousand in Talisia olivaeformis to 0.8 +/- 1 per thousand in Ficus cotinifolia, demonstrating vertical partitioning of soil/bedrock water among tree species. Stem water delta(18)O values were significantly different from that of groundwater for all the tree species investigated. Stem water samples plotted to the right of the meteoric water line, indicating utilization of water sources subject to evaporative isotopic enrichment. Foliar delta(13)C in adult trees varied widely among species, ranging from -25.3 +/- 0.3 per thousand in Enterolobium cyclocarpum to -28.7 +/- 0.4 per thousand in T. olivaeformis. Contrary to initial expectations, data indicate that native trees growing on shallow karst soils in northern Yucatan use little or no groundwater and depend mostly on water stored within the upper 2-3 m of the soil/bedrock profile. Water storage in subsurface soil-filled cavities and in the porous limestone bedrock is apparently sufficient to sustain adult evergreen trees throughout the pronounced dry season.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-006-0629-3DOI Listing
May 2007