Publications by authors named "György Csemiczky"

4 Publications

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Teaching medical students gynaecological examination using professional patients-evaluation of students' skills and feelings.

Med Teach 2005 Mar;27(2):130-5

Department of Woman and Child Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Karolinska Hospital/Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Gynaecological examinations are especially sensitive, both for the inexperienced student and for the woman being examined. To assist the students in this process, we have introduced a separate training session for medical students using so-called professional patients during the first week of the course in obstetrics and gynaecology. The aim of the study was to evaluate the outcome, attitudes and feelings towards this type of training and to gain knowledge on how to further develop the method. After the training session, students, teachers and professional patients were asked to fill in anonymously different questionnaires assessing their views on the education. In conclusion students, teachers and professional patients found this training programme with professional patients to be of great value. It was felt that the teaching session reduced stress and anxiety; the students were relieved, calmer and more secure after the training. It is strongly recommended that this type of programme with professional patients should be used for teaching gynaecological examination techniques to medical students.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01421590500046379DOI Listing
March 2005

Inhibin B predicts oocyte number and the ratio IGF-I/IGFBP-1 may indicate oocyte quality during ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization.

J Assist Reprod Genet 2003 May;20(5):167-76

Reproductive Medical Center, Department of Women and Child Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.

Purpose: To perform a retrospective analysis of 62 age-matched IVF-treated women in order to investigate whether levels of inhibin B, IGF-I, and IGFBP-1 in serum 2 days before oocyte retrieval and in follicular fluid at the day of oocyte retrieval might be useful as indicators of the ovarian ability to produce oocytes (ovarian reserve).

Methods: Patients were allocated into three groups on the basis of the number of oocytes retrieved. Group 1 ("low responders") had 0-3 oocytes, group 2 ("normal responders") had 6-11 oocytes, and group 3 ("high responders") had 12 oocytes or more. Levels of inhibin B, IGF-I, and IGFBP-1 in follicular fluid and in serum obtained 2 days before oocyte retrieval were analyzed and correlated to clinical parameters including estradiol levels, progesterone levels, follicle size, follicle number, and oocyte number.

Results: We found significant differences in inhibin B levels in the three groups. Inhibin B levels in follicular fluid and serum was strongly correlated to the number of oocytes retrieved (p < 0.01). The number of oocytes retrieved were also correlated to total FSH dose (p < 0.05), to estradiol 2 days before and at ovum pick-up (p < 0.05), to progesterone at ovum pick-up (p < 0.0001), to progesterone at embryo transfer (p < 0.05), and to the number of follicles (size 12-15 mm, p < 0.001, size > 15 mm, p < 0.01). Serum inhibin B also correlated to follicular fluid inhibin B (p < 0.01). Inhibin B was not correlated to pregnancy. In contrast, the ratio IGF-I/IGFBP-1 in serum as well as in follicular fluid was significantly higher in women who became pregnant (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: The results show that inhibin B in serum 2 days before oocyte retrieval predicts number of oocytes retrieved. Since inhibin B in serum before oocyte retrieval in ovarian hyperstimulation was strongly predictive of the number of oocytes retrieved, it appears useful as a marker for ovarian response. Inhibin B did not predict treatment outcome, whereas the ratio IGF-I/IGFBP-1 in serum and follicular fluid was significantly higher in women who became pregnant. The ratio IGF-I/IGFBP-1 may thus reflect oocyte quality.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3455298PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1023656225053DOI Listing
May 2003

Predictive power of clomiphene citrate challenge test for failure of in vitro fertilization treatment.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2002 Oct;81(10):954-61

Reproductive Medical Center, Department of Women and Child Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: To evaluate the impact of ovarian reserve on the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment in 140 women, in a total of 279 treatment cycles.

Methods: All women underwent a clomiphene citrate (CC) challenge test to assess their ovarian reserve before IVF treatment. One hundred and eighteen women (84%) had normal basal follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels (3.1-10.0 IU/l) and 22 women (16%) had elevated FSH levels (> 10.0-24.0 IU/l). The FSH levels measured on cycle day 10 showed that 106 (76%) of the women could be regarded as having a normal ovarian reserve and 34 (24%) a diminished ovarian reserve.

Results: In the group with diminished ovarian reserve, pregnancies and live births were dramatically lower than in the group with normal ovarian reserve. Counting only the first cycle (n = 140), the number of ongoing pregnancies and live birth rate were highly different between the two groups: 3% vs. 36% (1/33 vs. 28/78). Counting all treatment cycles (n = 210 + 69) the clinical pregnancy rate in the diminished ovarian reserve group was 6%-31% compared with the normal woman (4/69 compared 65/210). The number of started treatment cycles per woman were similar in the two groups. The length of the ovarian stimulations were slightly longer in the group with elevated FSH compared with the group with normal FSH levels. The number of cancellations resulting from insufficient ovarian response was significantly higher in the group with diminished ovarian reserve (n = 38, 55%) compared with the normal women (n = 32, 15%) (p < 0.0001). In addition, the average E2 levels before oocyte pick up were significantly lower in the group of women with diminished ovarian reserve compared with normal women (p < 0.0001). Calculation of the sensitivity and specificity of the CC test showed that an abnormal test has a high probability for a negative treatment outcome. The number of retrieved, fertilized oocytes, the number of divided oocytes, and the number of embryo transfers in the first as well as in all cycles differed significantly between the two of groups women (p < 0.001-0.009).

Conclusions: We found that the CC challenge test is a useful tool in assessing a woman's ovarian capacity before infertility treatment. The predictive value of the test for a negative outcome of IVF treatment was strong. We recommend performing the test before infertility treatment. This may prevent unnecessary treatment trials and unrealistic expectations from both patients and doctors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0412.2002.811010.xDOI Listing
October 2002

Lipoproteins and BMI: a comparison between women during transition to menopause and regularly menstruating healthy women.

Maturitas 2002 Mar;41(3):177-85

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Huddinge University Hospital, SE-14186 Huddinge, Sweden.

Unlabelled: One hundred and forty-three women born 1942 were followed for 5 years during transition to menopause (49--54 years of age). Changes in menopausal status, body mass index (BMI) and circulating lipoproteins cholesterol, (chol), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein, (HDL) and total triglycerides (TG) were measured, once yearly and compared with a control group of normally menstruating healthy, non-smoking women 23--39 years old.

Results: Chol was significantly higher P<0.0001 in the study group visits 1--5 when compared with the controls and higher at visit 4 compared with visit 1(P<0.05) LDL was significantly lower in the study group and at visit 5 compared with visit 2 (P<0.05) HDL was significantly lower at visits 1--3 and 5 when compared with the controls (P<0.001) and to visit 4 (P<0.0001). TG was significantly higher in the study group (P<0.0001) and increased significantly during the 5-year study. BMI was significantly higher in the older women (P<0.001) and increased during 5-years of study (P<0.0001). When multiple stepwise regression analyses were performed at visit 5 using education, menopausal status, use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), BMI and smoking as predictor variables, postmenopausal status was found to be significantly associated with high LDL (P<0.3), while high BMI significantly predicted low HDL and high TG levels. Perimenopausal status was significantly associated with high HDL levels.

Conclusion: Age, BMI and menopausal status are significant predictors of circulating lipoprotein levels during transition to menopause.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0378-5122(01)00258-4DOI Listing
March 2002
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