Publications by authors named "Guopeng Zhu"

5 Publications

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An efficient papaya leaf distortion mosaic potyvirus vector for virus-induced gene silencing in papaya.

Hortic Res 2021 Jul 1;8(1):144. Epub 2021 Jul 1.

Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Resources of Tropical Crops, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs & Institute of Tropical Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, 571101, Haikou, China.

Papaya (Carica papaya L.) is regarded as an excellent model for genomic studies of tropical trees because of its short generation time and its small genome that has been sequenced. However, functional genomic studies in papaya depend on laborious genetic transformations because no rapid tools exist for this species. Here, we developed a highly efficient virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for use in papaya by modifying an artificially attenuated infectious clone of papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV; genus: Potyvirus), PLDMV-E, into a stable Nimble Cloning (NC)-based PLDMV vector, pPLDMV-NC, in Escherichia coli. The target fragments for gene silencing can easily be cloned into pPLDMV-NC without multiple digestion and ligation steps. Using this PLDMV VIGS system, we silenced and characterized five endogenous genes in papaya, including two common VIGS marker genes, namely, phytoene desaturase, Mg-chelatase H subunit, putative GIBBERELLIN (GA)-INSENSITIVE DWARF1A and 1B encoding GA receptors; and the cytochrome P450 gene CYP83B1, which encodes a key enzyme involved in benzylglucosinolate biosynthesis. The results demonstrate that our newly developed PLDMV VIGS vector is a rapid and convenient tool for functional genomic studies in papaya.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41438-021-00579-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8245588PMC
July 2021

Multiple MYB Activators and Repressors Collaboratively Regulate the Juvenile Red Fading in Leaves of Sweetpotato.

Front Plant Sci 2020 25;11:941. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Key Laboratory of Tropical Biological Resources, Ministry of Education, School of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hainan University, Haikou, China.

Juvenile red fading describes the phenomenon in plants whereby red young leaves gradually turn green as they mature. While this phenomenon is commonly observed, the underlying molecular mechanism is still obscure as the classic model plants do not exhibit this process. Here, the molecular mechanism for the loss of anthocyanins during juvenile red fading were explored in the sweetpotato ( L.) cultivar "Chuanshan Zi". The MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) regulatory complexes for anthocyanins were examined with five stages of leaf development from C1 to C5. Alternating accumulation of anthocyanins and chlorophylls caused the leaf color change. Five anthocyanin components were identified by ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS), and their contents were highest at stage C2. Transcriptomic analysis showed massive gene expression alteration during leaf development. The anthocyanin structural genes expressed in sweetpotato leaves were screened and found to be highly comparable with those identified in morning glories. The screened anthocyanin regulatory genes included one bHLH (), one WDR (), three MYB activators (, and ), and five MYB repressors (, , , and ). The expression trends of MYBs were key to the red fading process: the activators were highly expressed in early red leaves and were all accompanied by simultaneously expressed MYB repressors, which may act to prevent excessive accumulation of anthocyanins. The only antagonistic repressor, , was highly expressed in green leaves, and may be critical for declined anthocyanin content at later stages. Further functional verification of the above transcription factors were conducted by promoter activation tests. These tests showed that the MBW complexes of IbMYB1/IbMYB2/IbMYB3-IbbHLH2-IbWDR1 not only activated promoters of anthocyanin structural genes and , but also promoters for and , indicating both hierarchical and feedback regulations. This study outlines the elaborate regulatory network of MBW complexes involving multiple MYBs which allow for the timely accumulation of anthocyanins in sweetpotato leaves. These results may also provide clues for similar studies of juvenile red fading in other plant species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2020.00941DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7330089PMC
June 2020

The genome evolution and domestication of tropical fruit mango.

Genome Biol 2020 03 6;21(1):60. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Tropical Crops Genetic Resources Institute, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences & Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Crop Gene Resources and Germplasm Enhancement in Southern China, No. 4 Xueyuan Road, Haikou, 571100, Hainan, China.

Background: Mango is one of the world's most important tropical fruits. It belongs to the family Anacardiaceae, which includes several other economically important species, notably cashew, sumac and pistachio from other genera. Many species in this family produce family-specific urushiols and related phenols, which can induce contact dermatitis.

Results: We generate a chromosome-scale genome assembly of mango, providing a reference genome for the Anacardiaceae family. Our results indicate the occurrence of a recent whole-genome duplication (WGD) event in mango. Duplicated genes preferentially retained include photosynthetic, photorespiration, and lipid metabolic genes that may have provided adaptive advantages to sharp historical decreases in atmospheric carbon dioxide and global temperatures. A notable example of an extended gene family is the chalcone synthase (CHS) family of genes, and particular genes in this family show universally higher expression in peels than in flesh, likely for the biosynthesis of urushiols and related phenols. Genome resequencing reveals two distinct groups of mango varieties, with commercial varieties clustered with India germplasms and demonstrating allelic admixture, and indigenous varieties from Southeast Asia in the second group. Landraces indigenous in China formed distinct clades, and some showed admixture in genomes.

Conclusions: Analysis of chromosome-scale mango genome sequences reveals photosynthesis and lipid metabolism are preferentially retained after a recent WGD event, and expansion of CHS genes is likely associated with urushiol biosynthesis in mango. Genome resequencing clarifies two groups of mango varieties, discovers allelic admixture in commercial varieties, and shows distinct genetic background of landraces.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-020-01959-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7059373PMC
March 2020

Rapid detection of two emerging viruses associated with necrotic symptoms in Areca catechu L. by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP).

J Virol Methods 2020 07 3;281:113795. Epub 2019 Dec 3.

Institute of Tropical Agriculture and Forestry, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China. Electronic address:

Two reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assays were developed for the detection of areca palm necrotic ringspot virus (ANRSV) and areca palm necrotic spindle-spot virus (ANSSV), respectively. These two emerging viruses both induce necrotic symptoms in areca palms. The coat protein (CP) gene of ANRSV and the 9 K gene of ANSSV were used to design the respective RT-LAMP primers for the assays. Each set of four primers designed for each of these viruses was found to be highly specific in the detection of the respective targeted virus. The optimal incubation conditions for the RT-LAMP assays were 63 °C for 40 min for ANRSV and at 61 °C for 40 min for ANSSV. The sensitivity of the RT-LAMP method for each of these viruses was 10-fold greater than that of the corresponding conventional reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The RT-LAMP assays may be useful for the rapid early detection of ANSSV and ANRSV in commercial areca palm production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jviromet.2019.113795DOI Listing
July 2020

Early Response of Radish to Heat Stress by Strand-Specific Transcriptome and miRNA Analysis.

Int J Mol Sci 2019 Jul 6;20(13). Epub 2019 Jul 6.

Hainan Key Laboratory for Sustainable Utilization of Tropical Bioresources, College of Horticulture, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China.

Radish is a crucial vegetable crop of the family with many varieties and large cultivated area in China. Radish is a cool season crop, and there are only a few heat tolerant radish varieties in practical production with little information concerning the related genes in response to heat stress. In this work, some physiological parameter changes of young leaves under short-term heat stress were detected. Furthermore, we acquired 1802 differentially expressed mRNAs (including encoding some heat shock proteins, heat shock factor and heat shock-related transcription factors), 169 differentially expressed lncRNAs and three differentially expressed circRNAs (novel_circ_0000265, novel_circ_0000325 and novel_circ_0000315) through strand-specific RNA sequencing technology. We also found 10 differentially expressed miRNAs (ath-miR159b-3p, athmiR159c, ath-miR398a-3p, athmiR398b-3p, ath-miR165a-5p, ath-miR169g-3p, novel_86, novel_107, novel_21 and ath-miR171b-3p) by small RNA sequencing technology. Through function prediction and enrichment analysis, our results suggested that the significantly possible pathways/complexes related to heat stress in radish leaves were circadian rhythm-plant, photosynthesis-antenna proteins, photosynthesis, carbon fixation in photosynthetic organisms, arginine and proline metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, peroxisome and plant hormone signal transduction. Besides, we identified one lncRNA-miRNA-mRNAs combination responsive to heat stress. These results will be helpful for further illustration of molecular regulation networks of how radish responds to heat stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms20133321DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6651063PMC
July 2019