Publications by authors named "Guillaume Moriceau"

23 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Activity of cabozantinib in radioresistant brain metastases from renal cell carcinoma: two case reports.

J Med Case Rep 2018 Nov 25;12(1):351. Epub 2018 Nov 25.

Department of Radiation Therapy, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France.

Background: Renal cell carcinoma represents 3-5% of adult malignant tumors. Metastases are found in 30-40% of patients and brain metastases occurred in more than 10% of them. Despite significant progress in medical treatment, patients with brain metastases still have a limited survival. Cabozantinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor directed against vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, was recently registered for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Almost no data are, however, available on patients with brain metastases.

Case Presentation: Case 1 is a 51-year-old man of North African origin; Case 2 is a 55-year-old European man. Case 1 and Case 2 had metastases of renal carcinoma at initial diagnosis and were treated with vascular endothelial growth factor receptors tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Case 1 had clear cell renal carcinoma and underwent nephrectomy; he then received several lines of tyrosine kinase inhibitor directed against vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and the mTor complex. During the second treatment a brain metastasis was diagnosed and treated with radiosurgery with rapid efficacy. Two years later he received nivolumab, an antibody directed against the programmed death-1 and programmed death-ligand 1 complex, but disease progression was observed with the reappearance of the brain metastasis together with neurologic symptoms. Cabozantinib was administered and induced a rapid clinical improvement as well as tumor regression in all sites including his brain. Sequencing of his tumor evidenced a mutation of the MET gene. Case 2 had a papillary renal carcinoma with brain metastases at time of diagnosis. After radiation of the brain tumors, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor was administered for 3 years. The disease was under control in all sites except in his brain; several new brain metastases requiring new radiation treatments developed. The disease finally progressed at all metastatic sites including his brain and he had several neurological symptoms. Cabozantinib was administered and rapidly induced a clinical improvement; a further computed tomography scan and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed significant tumor regressions. No MET gene mutation or amplification was observed in the tumor analysis.

Conclusions: These case reports indicate that cabozantinib was able, first, to reach brain tumors and second, to induce significant regressions in renal carcinoma brain metastases that were resistant to radiation as well as to previous systemic vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13256-018-1875-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6260776PMC
November 2018

Les métastases des cancers.

Rev Prat 2016 Sep;66(7):e298

Département d'oncologie médicale, institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, 42270 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France.

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September 2016

Signes d'appel et investigations paracliniques ; caractérisation du stade ; pronostic.

Rev Prat 2016 Sep;66(7):e291-e297

Département d'oncologie médicale, institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, 42270 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France.

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September 2016

Radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer in nonagenarian patients: a framework for new paradigms.

Chin J Cancer 2016 May 9;35:43. Epub 2016 May 9.

Department of Radiotherapy, Lucien Neuwirth Cancer Institute, 42271, Saint Priest En Jarez, France.

No consensus exists regarding the role of radiotherapy in the management of gynecologic cancer in nonagenarian patients. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 19 consecutive nonagenarian patients with gynecologic cancer (6 endometrial cancers, 6 cervical cancers, 4 vulvar cancers, and 3 vaginal cancers) who were treated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was performed mainly in a palliative setting (n = 12; 63.2%), with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 6-76 Gy). Infrequent major acute or late toxicities were reported. Among 19 patients, 9 (47.4%) experienced tumor progression, 5 (26.3%) experienced complete response, 2 (10.5%) experienced stable disease and/or partial response. At last follow-up, 12 patients (63.2%) had died; most deaths (n = 9) occurred because of the cancer. These results suggest that radiotherapy is feasible in the treatment of nonagenarian patients with gynecologic cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40880-016-0104-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4862062PMC
May 2016

Clinical Impact of Bevacizumab in Patients with Relapsed Glioblastoma: Focus on a Real-Life Monocentric SurVey (SV1 Study).

Chemotherapy 2016 9;61(5):269-74. Epub 2016 Apr 9.

Objectives: Glioblastoma is one of the most frequent primitive brain tumors. Patients who experience tumor relapse after surgery and concomitant radiochemotherapy have a dismal prognosis. The objective of this study is to analyze efficacy data in terms of overall survival (OS) and progression- free survival (PFS) following combination therapy with bevacizumab (BVZ) and irinotecan among patients with relapsed glioblastoma. Safety data will also be reviewed and all results will be compared with data of the literature.

Methods: In this single-center retrospective study, all records of patients treated with BVZ and irinotecan for a relapsed glioblastoma were analyzed. Each chemotherapy cycle was repeated every 15 days until progression. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurologic examination were repeated every 6 weeks during treatment.

Results: Forty-five patients were analyzed. The median number of BVZ-irinotecan cycles was 8 (range 1-38). Median PFS was 26 weeks and median OS was 28 weeks. Eighteen of the 45 patients (40% of cases) had an objective response 6 months after initiation of treatment. Two patients had to discontinue treatment due to toxicity.

Conclusions: The results of the SV1 study are consistent with those found in phase II studies evaluating the same treatment. The irinotecan-BVZ combination is effective in relapsed glioblastoma with acceptable toxicity. Biomarkers predictive of response to BVZ should help in the selection of patients who could benefit from treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000443719DOI Listing
February 2017

[Validation of a questionnaire assessing patients' adherence and skill level of management for oral capecitabine treatment].

Bull Cancer 2016 Mar 23;103(3):241-51. Epub 2016 Feb 23.

Centre Hygée, institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, 108 bis, avenue A.-Raimond, 42270 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France; CIC-EC, Inserm 1408, 42000 Saint-Étienne, France. Electronic address:

Introduction: There is a plea for the development of tools allowing the screening of fragile patients under oral chemotherapy. Such tools would identify patients with difficulties for being adherent or for having low side effects management skills. The aim of this study is to validate psychometric characteristics of a questionnaire assessing patients' adherence and skill level of management for oral capecitabine treatment.

Methods: Questionnaire's psychometric validation study. Prospective monocentric cohort. Cases-simulated questionnaire was constructed, according to recommendations, from the results of a socio-anthropological study. Validation phases included: a pre-testing and a field-testing including acceptability, scale reliability and internal consistency were conducted involving experts and patients sample.

Results: Pre-testing excluded 1 item. Acceptability phase included 15 patients, who did not change any of the questions. Reliability and internal consistency were tested with 67 patients. Cancer site did not statistically influence questionnaire answers. No correlation was identify with the analyse performed for the internal consistency testing.

Conclusion: This questionnaire has shown to be a valid tool for the assessment of the adherence and side effect management skill for patients with capecitabine treatment. It can easily be uses as a screening tool for prescribers. It can also be used as an evaluation tool for a therapeutic education programme in this field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2016.01.010DOI Listing
March 2016

Translating Clinical Evidence-Based Medicine into the Real World: Single-Center Experience with Cabazitaxel in Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients.

Chemotherapy 2016 12;61(3):127-33. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Background: We studied the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel in unselected real-life patients.

Patients And Methods: We retrospectively investigated all patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPC) treated with cabazitaxel 25 mg/m2 i.v. every 3 weeks combined with oral prednisolone (10 mg once daily) after first-line docetaxel chemotherapy. Study issues were to report patient characteristics and cabazitaxel data in terms of tolerance and efficacy. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. All data were compared with TROPIC results.

Results: From 2011 to 2014, 41 patients received cabazitaxel; 15 patients (37%) had a performance status (PS) ≥2 versus 7% (p < 0.0001) in TROPIC, and 38 patients (93%) presented a Gleason score ≥7 at baseline (vs. 60%; p < 0.0001). All patients had metastatic disease at baseline. Previous therapies were radiotherapy in 17 patients (41 vs. 61%; p = 0.01) and surgery in 24 patients (59 vs. 52%; p = 0.4). The median number of cabazitaxel cycles was 5 (1-10) versus 6 (3-10) in TROPIC. Five patients completed 10 cycles of cabazitaxel (12%) versus 28% in TROPIC (p = 0.03). Toxicities were anemia (12 patients, 29%), diarrhea (9 patients, 22%), nausea (7 patients, 17%), pain (6 patients, 15%), sepsis (4 patients, 10%), neutropenia (3 patients, 7%) and urinary tract infection (1 patient, 2%). The tumor response rate was 19.5 versus 14.4% in TROPIC (nonsignificant). PFS was 4.5 months (95% CI 3.3-6.4) in our analysis and 2.8 months (95% CI 2.4-3.0) in TROPIC. OS was 12.1 months (95% CI 9.2 to not reached) and 15.1 months (95% CI 14.1-16.3), respectively.

Conclusion: In our unselected mPC patients with poorer baseline clinical conditions and aggressive disease, cabazitaxel seems efficient and not more toxic than in the TROPIC study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000441379DOI Listing
November 2016

Real-World Outcomes of Combination Chemotherapy with Trabectedin plus Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in Patients with Recurrent Ovarian Cancer: A Single-Center Experience.

Chemotherapy 2016 12;61(3):122-6. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Background: Trabectedin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) proved efficacious as second-line treatment for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC).

Methods: We report a single-center retrospective analysis of the efficacy and tolerance of trabectedin 1.1 mg/m2 every 3 weeks in a cohort of real-life ROC patients.

Results: From February 2012 to January 2014, 17 patients were treated with trabectedin alone or combined with PLD. Median age was 61 years (range: 48-78). Performance status was 0-1 in 16 patients (94%). Disease response rate was 53% and disease control rate was 76%. At the end of the follow-up, 8 patients (47%) were alive. Median overall survival was 17.6 months (95% CI 13.6 to not reached). Median progression-free survival was 6.7 months (95% CI 5.4-10.0). The most frequent grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (n = 4, 24%) and nausea/vomiting (n = 4, 24%).

Conclusion: Trabectedin combined with PLD seems efficient in and well tolerated by real-life ROC patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000441378DOI Listing
November 2016

Standard or accelerated methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin as neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced urothelial bladder cancer: Does dose intensity matter?

Eur J Cancer 2016 Feb 25;54:69-74. Epub 2015 Dec 25.

Department of Medical Oncology, Hôpital Saint-Louis, AP-HP, Paris, France; Paris Diderot University, Paris, France. Electronic address:

Background: There is continuing controversy regarding the optimal regimen for neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in bladder cancer.

Patients And Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 241 consecutive bladder cancer patients who received a combination of methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin (MVAC) using a standard (52 patients) or an accelerated schedule (189 patients) as NAC before radical cystectomy in 17 centres of the French GEnito-urinary TUmour Group from March 2004-May 2013.

Results: The median age was 62 years. As expected, the median number of cycles, the median total dose of cisplatin and the median cisplatin dose intensity were higher in patients treated with the accelerated regimen. Conversely, the median duration of chemotherapy was shorter. Regarding toxicity, grade III/IV neutropenia, grade III thrombocytopenia and grade III anaemia as well were more frequently observed in patients treated with the standard regimen. Among 211 (88%) patients who proceeded to cystectomy, 75 (35%) patients achieved an ypT0 pN0 status (no pathologic residual tumour cells) with no significant difference according to the MVAC schedule. Three-year overall survival rates were 66.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 56-79) and 72% (95% CI, 59.5-88) in the standard and accelerated cohorts, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, two independent prognostic parameters were retained: the ypT0 stage and the ypN0 stage. Heterogeneity test did not show any interaction with NAC regimens.

Conclusion: Similar pathological response and survival rates were observed whatever the chemotherapy regimen used. Haematological toxicity was greater in patients who received standard MVAC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2015.11.017DOI Listing
February 2016

Chemotherapy Regimen in Nonagenarian Cancer Patients: A Bi-Institutional Experience.

Chemotherapy 2016 10;61(2):65-71. Epub 2015 Nov 10.

Background: The elderly population in Western countries is growing and constitutes a public health issue. Concomitantly, age-related diseases such as cancer increase. There are few data on the efficacy, tolerability and toxicity of specific anticancer therapy in the very elderly patients; therefore, their management is not standardized.

Methods: In this bi-institutional study, we reviewed medical records of patients who received or continued specific anticancer therapy beyond the age of 90 years. Geriatric assessment was not reported for our patients. Twelve patients were enrolled. Their general health condition was good, and half of them were living in elderly institutions. Ten patients had a solid tumor and 2 were treated for hematological malignancies. Most were diagnosed with a locally advanced or metastatic disease, and the goal of treatment was curative for only 1 patient. Six patients received chemotherapy as first-line treatment, 4 patients received targeted therapy and 2 received concomitant chemoradiation. Four patients received a second-line treatment.

Results: Despite a significant reduction in treatment posology in half of the patients, 8 acute grade 3/4 toxicities were reported and 2 patients died of treatment-related septic shock. Median duration of first-line treatment was 3.2 months, and progression-free survival ranged from 18 to 311 days. Overall survival ranged from 18 days to 11 years.

Conclusion: Aging is a heterogeneous process, and management of elderly patients is a multidisciplinary approach. Geriatric assessment helps to identify older patients with a higher risk of morbidity/mortality and allows to assess the risks and benefits of specific anticancer therapy. The choice of treatment should be based primarily on the expected symptomatic benefit, and treatment should not compromise the quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000441018DOI Listing
September 2016

Social inequalities and cancer: can the European deprivation index predict patients' difficulties in health care access? a pilot study.

Oncotarget 2016 Jan;7(1):1055-65

Department of Public Health, Hygée Centre, Lucien Neuwirth Cancer Institute, Saint Priest en Jarez, France.

Context: The European Deprivation Index (EDI), is a new ecological estimate for Socio-Economic Status (SES). This study postulates that Time-To-Treatment could be used as a cancer quality-of -care surrogate in order to identify the association between cancer patient's SES and quality of care in a French comprehensive cancer center.

Methods: retrospective mono-centered cohort study. All consecutive incoming adult patients diagnosed for breast cancer (BC), prostate cancer (PC), colorectal cancer (CRC), lung cancer (LC) or sarcoma (S) were included between January 2013 and December 2013. The association of EDI and Time-To-Diagnosis (TTD), as well as Time-To-Treatment (TTT) was analyzed using a cox regression, and a strata analysis per tumor site was performed.

Results: 969 patients were included. Primitive tumor site was 505 BC (52%), 169 PC (17%), 145 LC (15%), 116 CRC (12%), and 34 S (4%). Median TTD was 1.41 months (Q1-Q3 0.5 to 3.5 months). Median TTT was 0.9 months (0.4 - 1.4). In a multivariate analysis, we identified the tumor site as a predictive factor to influence TTD, shorter for BC (0.75 months, [0.30- 1.9]) than PC (4.69 months [1.6-29.7]), HR 0.27 95%CI = [0.22-0.34], p < 0.001. TTT was also shorter for BC (0.75 months [0.4-1.1]) than PC (2.02 [0.9-3.2]), HR 0.32 95%CI = [0.27-0.39], p < 0.001. EDI quintiles were not found associated with either TTT or TTD.

Conclusions: Deprivation estimated by the EDI does not appear to be related to an extension of the Time-to-Diagnosis or Time-to-Treatment in our real-life population. Further research should be done to identify other frailty-sensitive factors that could be responsible for delays in care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.6274DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4808051PMC
January 2016

What makes real world outcomes in soft tissue sarcomas? A mono-institutional trabectedin experience.

Bull Cancer 2015 Oct 16;102(10):814-22. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département de radiothérapie, 42270 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France. Electronic address:

Introduction: Trabectedin proved its efficacy in relapsed advanced soft tissue sarcomas (STS) in 3 multicenter phase II studies with selected patients. The aim of the present study is to investigate trabectedin efficacy and tolerance in a cohort of "real-life" unselected patients with sarcoma.

Methods: A single-center analysis was carried out on all consecutive patients with histologically proven unresectable advanced or metastatic STS, who received at least one cycle of trabectedin. Data on efficacy and tolerance were retrospectively reported.

Results: From 2004 to 2014, data of 59 patients were reviewed. Median age was 62 years (from 23 to 87). A total of 317 cycles of trabectedin were administered. Twenty-five patients (42%) suffered grade 3-4 hematological toxicity, mainly with neutropenia (22 patients, 37%). Disease control rate was 24%, mainly with stable disease, and 45 patients (76%) experienced disease progression. Median overall survival was 6.6 months (95%CI [4.9-12.6]).

Conclusion: Trabectedin might be an option for patients without any other validated alternative, but phase III study evaluating trabectedin+best supportive care (BSC) versus BSC is necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2015.07.010DOI Listing
October 2015

Real-World Vinflunine Outcomes in Bladder Cancer in a Single-Institution Study: Moving Beyond Clinical Trials.

Clin Genitourin Cancer 2015 Dec 6;13(6):588-92. Epub 2015 Jun 6.

Radiation Oncology Department, Lucien Neuwirth Cancer Institute, Saint Priest en Jarez, France. Electronic address:

Purpose: Intravenous vinflunine 320 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks plus best supportive care resulted in better overall survival in comparison with best supportive care alone for eligible patients with failure of prior therapy with locally advanced or metastatic transitional cell cancer of urothelial tract (TCCU). The objective of the present study was to describe our real-life experience of vinflunine for treatment of patients with TCCU.

Patients And Methods: We retrospectively investigated all patients with TCCU who received at least 1 cycle of vinflunine.

Results: Nineteen patients were treated between May 2010 and March 2014 in a compassionate-use program. Performance status was poor in our real-life cohort, with 6 patients (32%) with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2. Median duration of vinflunine treatment was 2.4 months (range, 0-4.3 months), and median number of cycles was 3 (range, 1-6). Total response rate was 32%, with partial responses only. Disease control rate was 53%, with a median duration of 7.7 months (range, 6.0-9.4 months). Median progression-free survival was 87 days, or 2.9 months (range, 0.7-11.7 months). After vinflunine treatment, 42% of patients received from 1 to 3 additional lines of chemotherapy. The most frequent grade 4 toxicities were constipation (26%), with 3 intestinal obstructions (16%) and 1 mechanical ileus (5%); and asthenia and fatigue (21%).

Conclusion: Vinflunine, as a TCCU second-line chemotherapy, brings benefits, particularly in cases where there is no alternative treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clgc.2015.05.008DOI Listing
December 2015

The Combination of 80 Years of Age and Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Remain an Uphill Battle: A Case Report with Cabazitaxel as a Double-Edged Sword.

Chemotherapy 2014 20;60(5-6):300-1. Epub 2015 May 20.

Medical Oncology, Lucien Neuwirth Cancer Institute, Saint Priest en Jarez, France.

We report the case of an 80-year-old patient who presented with a progressive prostate metastatic cancer with poor performance status. The patient had already benefitted from docetaxel and abiraterone. A new line of chemotherapy by cabazitaxel was started with good response, and there was a dramatic improvement in general status and pain symptoms. Age and performance status alone should not be limiting decision factors for elderly cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000377620DOI Listing
April 2016

Hypofractionated radiation therapy for treatment of bladder carcinoma in patients aged 90 years and more: A new paradigm to be explored?

Int Urol Nephrol 2015 Jul 17;47(7):1129-34. Epub 2015 May 17.

Département d'oncologie médicale, Institut de Cancérologie Lucien Neuwirth, 108 bis avenue Albert Raimond, BP60008, 42271, Saint Priest en Jarez Cedex, France.

Introduction: There are only scarce data on the optimal management of patients who present with a bladder carcinoma and who are aged 90 years and older.

Patients And Methods: We retrospectively reviewed records from radiotherapy departments from two university hospitals, two private centers and one public center to identify patients who underwent radiotherapy for bladder cancer over the past decade and who were aged 90 years or older. From 2003 to 2013, 14 patients aged 90 years or older receiving RT for bladder malignant tumors were identified.

Results: Mean age was 92.7 years. Ten patients (71 %) had a general health status altered (PS 2-3) at the beginning of RT. A total of 14 RT courses were delivered, including six treatments (43 %) with curative intent and eight treatments (57 %) with palliative intent. Palliative intent mainly encompassed hemostatic RT (36 %). At last follow-up, two patients (14 %) experienced complete response, one patient (7 %) experienced partial response, three patients (21 %) had their disease stable, and three patients (21 %) experienced tumor progression, of whom two patients with the progression of symptoms. There was no reported high-grade acute local toxicity in 14 patients (100 %). One patient experienced delayed grade 2 toxicity with pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. At last follow-up, seven patients (50 %) were deceased. Cancer was the cause of death for five patients.

Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiotherapy remains feasible for nonagenarians with bladder cancer. Further investigations including analysis of geriatric comorbidities and impact of treatments on quality of life should be conducted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11255-015-0999-8DOI Listing
July 2015

[Elderly patients and radiotherapy: A short review].

Bull Cancer 2015 Jun 31;102(6):539-49. Epub 2015 Mar 31.

Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département de radiothérapie, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex, France. Electronic address:

The ageing of French population imposes to radiotherapists the challenge to treat older patients and to adjust their treatment. Unthinkable 30 years ago, radiation therapy concerns nowadays patients aged more than 90 years old. Oncogeriatric scales have been improved those last years without necessarily making sure that the right treatment is given to the right patient: if oncogeriatric scales use influences the final therapeutic decision, it does not define new target volumes, new doses, or new fractionation protocols. Except for some organs, there is not, for the moment, any consensus concerning geriatric population adapted treatments. This makes any therapeutic decision difficult. The present review has for objective to realise a report of the studies about favorable and unfavorable effects of radiation therapy amongst aged (>70 years old) or very aged (>90years old) population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2015.03.001DOI Listing
June 2015

[Rare cancers and new radiotherapy techniques].

Bull Cancer 2015 Jan 30;102(1):105-12. Epub 2014 Dec 30.

Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département de radiothérapie, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex, France. Electronic address:

Rare cancers represent about a quarter of all cancers diagnosed in Europe, and their incidence is increasing. Meanwhile, scientific advances provide techniques, which become more and more sophisticated in the domain of radiotherapy. Treatment options for radiotherapy rare cancers are increasing, but are not yet evaluated. The question of the appropriateness of treatment by modern radiotherapy techniques in rare cancers remains. There are a lot of cases reported in the literature for treating rare cancers by modern technology. These techniques are often used when anatomical and dosimetric constraints do not achieve optimal treatment by surgery or standard radiotherapy. In contrast, standard radiotherapy techniques also provide good results in terms of overall survival and tolerance. They are also less expensive and less complex in terms of dosimetry. The establishment of specialized centers in rare cancers seems essential to evaluate the appropriateness of the use of modern techniques in these cases. Currently, data from the literature does not provide an answer to this question.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2014.12.001DOI Listing
January 2015

General management of nonagenarian patients: a review of the literature.

Swiss Med Wkly 2014 23;144:w14059. Epub 2014 Dec 23.

Department of Radiotherapy, Lucien Neuwirth Cancer Institute, Saint Priest-En-Jarez, France.

The number of nonagenarian people in the world is steadily growing. This phenomenon will increase in future years: in 2050, world population prospects estimate 71.16 million people aged 90 years or older. The two main causes of death among people aged 85 years or more in Europe in 2003 were cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases and cancers. However, the elderly are often excluded from clinical trials; they are underrepresented in clinical registries and especially nonagenarians. Care (medical, surgical, oncology) of these very elderly is currently insufficiently based on scientific recommendations. For the physician, the choice to treat or not to treat very elderly patients (for fear of side effects) is difficult. Oncology is particularly affected by this problem. Here we review these different fields of internal medicine management of nonagenarian patients with a special focus on oncology and on comprehensive geriatric assessment as a base for all care decision taking.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4414/smw.2014.14059DOI Listing
May 2015

[Primary digestive melanomas: is there any consensus?].

Bull Cancer 2014 Jun;101(6):637-40

Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, Département de radiothérapie, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France.

In clinical practice and the literature, malignant melanoma usually appears in typical sites where melanocytes can be found: skin, eyes meninges and anal region. Malignant melanomas of the esophagus-gastrointestinal (EGI) tract are usually metastatic. Primary and diffuse EGI tract melanoma is rare and only a few descriptions of this presentation have been found in the literature. The prognosis of EGI tract melanoma is frightening because of late diagnosis and high malignancy potential. Treatment is based essentially on surgery. The objective of the present study is to specify the clinical and therapeutic aspects of primary digestive melanoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/bdc.2014.1948DOI Listing
June 2014

Feasibility of radiation therapy in patients 90years of age and older: a French multicentre analysis.

Eur J Cancer 2014 May 7;50(8):1490-7. Epub 2014 Mar 7.

Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie Lucien Neuwirth, Saint Priest en Jarez, France.

Background: There are only scarce data on the management of patients aged 90years or older with cancer, and more particularly on the place of radiation therapy (RT). We report the first large study on patients (pts) aged 90years or older receiving RT.

Methods And Materials: Records from RT departments from five institutions were reviewed to identify pts 90years of age and older who underwent RT for various malignant tumours treated between 2003 and 2012. Tumours' characteristics were examined, as well as treatment specificities and treatment intent.

Results: 308 pts receiving 318 RT courses were identified, mean age was 93.2years (standard deviation 2.8). Treatment was given with curative and palliative intent in 44% and 56%, respectively. Factors associated with a curative treatment were performance status (PS), place of life, previous surgery and tumour stage. Median total prescribed dose was 36Gy (4-76Gy). Hypofractionation and split course were used in 88% and 7.3%, respectively. Most toxicities were mild to moderate. RT could not be completed in 23 pts (7.5%). No long-term toxicity was reported. Median overall survival was 22.9months (95CI: 15.5-42.7months). Cancer was the cause of death in 8.7% and 46% of pts treated with curative and palliative intent, respectively.

Conclusion: This study shows that RT is feasible for patients aged 90years or more. PS, place of life and tumour stage were factors of the therapeutic decision. There is no reason to withdraw pts with good general health condition from potentially curative RT, provided that careful attention is paid to factors of toxicity and to geriatric vulnerabilities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2014.02.012DOI Listing
May 2014

Uterine and ovary carcinosarcomas: outcome, prognosis factors, and adjuvant therapy.

Am J Clin Oncol 2015 Jun;38(3):272-7

*Département d'Oncologie Médicale †Département de Santé Publique ‡Département de Radiothérapie, Institut de Cancérologie Lucien Neuwirth §Département d'Oncologie Radiothérapie, Institut Gustave Roussy, Université Paris Sud, Paris ∥Service de Chirurgie Gynécologique, CHU Nord de Saint-Etienne, Saint Etienne, France.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the outcome and the prognosis factors of uterine and ovarian carcinosarcomas.

Methods: From January 1993 to January 2010, data from 68 consecutively treated patients with uterine (n=59) and ovarian (n=9) carcinosarcomas were retrospectively analyzed in a single French comprehensive cancer center.

Results: The median follow-up was 24.2 months (interquartile range [IQR]: 13.5 to 54.6). The median age was 69 years (IQR: 63 to 77). Patients were classified as FIGO stage I (n=28; 41%) and FIGO stage II to IV (n=40; 59%), respectively. There were 33 (49%) and 29 (43%) homologous and heterologous type, respectively. The median disease-free survival and overall survival were 21.9 months (IQR: 7.9 to 22.3) and 27.1 months (IQR: 14.5 to 72), respectively. No statistical differences of survival were reported concerning the initial location of the carcinosarcoma (uterine vs. ovarian). Radiation therapy (hazards ratio [HR]=0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16-0.67) and FIGO stage I (HR=0.4; 95% CI, 0.17-0.9) were associated with an increased disease-free survival. Homologous type (HR=3; 95% CI, 1.4-6.3) and FIGO stage II to IV (HR=2.64; 95% CI, 1.3-5.4) were associated with a decreased overall survival. There was no survival improvement for the 12% of patients receiving a multimodal adjuvant therapy.

Conclusions: Uterine and ovary carcinosarcomas present a worse prognosis. On the basis of the present study data, although it should be prospectively confirmed, a sequential or multimodal adjuvant therapy should be proposed to patients with early-stage uterine and ovary carcinosarcomas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/COC.0b013e3182979b27DOI Listing
June 2015

First assessment of whole-brain radiation therapy combined with pemetrexed-based chemotherapy in non-small-cell lung carcinoma: data on safety and efficacy.

Anticancer Drugs 2013 Aug;24(7):736-42

Department of Medical and Radiation Therapy, Hôpital d'Instruction des Armées du Val-de-Grâce, Paris, France.

The folate antimetabolite pemetrexed was approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic nonsquamous non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Its activity on brain metastases makes pemetrexed attractive in combination with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), but it could also potentially increase toxicity. We examined the medical records of 43 consecutive patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Patients received pemetrexed-based chemotherapy at a dose of 500 mg/m. The median total number of pemetrexed-based chemotherapy cycles was 4 (range: 1-28). During the course of chemotherapy, patients received WBRT delivering 30 Gy in 10 fractions (n=34) or 20 Gy in five fractions (n=9). The median follow-up time was 30.5 weeks (range: 1-79 weeks). Intracranial progression was a cause of death in nine patients (20.9%). Clinical benefit of WBRT was reported in 30 patients (69.8%). The best radiological response was a complete response in eight patients (18.6%), a partial response in 16 patients (37.2%), stable disease in 11 patients (25.6%), and progression in four patients (9.3%). A stable intracranial disease until the last follow-up was observed in 26 patients (60.5%). The median estimated overall survival was 31 weeks (95% CI: 24-37 weeks). Most WBRT-related toxicities were low and 21 patients (48.9%) had no reported acute neurological toxicity. One patient developed unexplained encephalopathy 5 weeks after WBRT completion in the context of progressive diffuse brain metastases. The combination of pemetrexed with WBRT led to considerable clinical improvement and tumor responses in most patients. Overall neurological toxicity was rather low. A clinical trial is essential for better analysis of the potential synergistic effects of a drug with radiation and evaluation of neurological toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CAD.0b013e328360974dDOI Listing
August 2013