Publications by authors named "Guilherme Corrêa de Oliveira"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Climate-induced distribution dynamics of , a stingless bee from Brazilian tropical dry forests.

Ecol Evol 2020 Sep 20;10(18):10130-10138. Epub 2020 Aug 20.

Instituto de Ciências Biológicas Universidade Federal do Pará Belém Brazil.

Aim: The objective of this study is to estimate the current potential geographic distribution of and to evaluate the influence of climate on the dynamics of suitable habitat availability in the past and in the future.

Location: Northeast region of Brazil and dry forest areas.

Methods: The habitat suitability modeling was based on two algorithms, two global circulation models, and six different scenarios. We used this tool to estimate the areas of occurrence in the past (Last Interglacial and Last Glacial Maximum), in the present, and in the future (years 2050 and 2070).

Results: According to the models, had great dynamics in the availability of suitable habitats with periods of retraction and expansion of these areas in the past. Our results suggest that this taxon may benefit in terms of climate suitability gain in Northeast Brazil in the future. In addition, we identified high-altitude areas and the eastern coast as climatically stable.

Conclusion: The information provided can be used by decision makers to support actions toward protecting and sustainably managing this taxon. Protection measures for this taxon are particularly important because this insect contributes to the local flora and, although our results indicate that the climate may favor this taxon, other factors can negatively affect it, such as high levels of habitat loss due to anthropogenic activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.6674DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7520209PMC
September 2020

A common vaginal microbiota composition among breeds of Bos taurus indicus (Gyr and Nellore).

Braz J Microbiol 2019 Oct 29;50(4):1115-1124. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

Describing the bovine vaginal microbiota is essential to better understand its physiology and its impact on health maintenance. Despite the economic importance of reproduction of these animals, bovine vaginal microbial community is still poorly described in comparison with rumen microbiome. Previous studies of our group described the vaginal microbiota of Nellore, an important Bos taurus indicus breed, using metagenomics. In order to better understand this microbiota, the present work aims to investigate another important breed, Gyr. Results have shown bacterial dominance over Archaea and Fungi was observed, with the most abundant bacterial phylum (Firmicutes) representing 40-50% of bacterial population, followed by Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. The Fungi kingdom had the Mycosphaerella genus as its main representative, followed by Cladosporium. Archaea were observed at a very low abundance in all animals, with a high relative abundance of Methanobrevibacter genus. These results demonstrate a high microbial diversity on vaginal tract of Gyr, as demonstrated for Nellore and different from the previously described for other species. Our results indicate a great similarity between vaginal microbiota of Nellore and Gyr despite the differences in animal handling and genetic improvement. As observed for both breeds, individual variation is the largest source of microbial diversity between animals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s42770-019-00120-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6863323PMC
October 2019

Revisiting the Phylogenetic History of Helminths Through Genomics, the Case of the New Genome.

Front Genet 2019 7;10:708. Epub 2019 Aug 7.

IMPaM, CONICET, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

The first parasitic helminth genome sequence was published in 2007; since then, only ∼200 genomes have become available, most of them being draft assemblies. Nevertheless, despite the medical and economical global impact of helminthic infections, parasite genomes in public databases are underrepresented. Recently, through an integrative approach involving morphological, genetic, and ecological aspects, we have demonstrated that the complete life cycle of (Cestoda: Taeniidae) is present in South America. The neotropical parasite is capable of developing in any felid species and producing human infections. Neotropical echinococcosis is poorly understood yet and requires a complex medical examination to provide the appropriate intervention. Only a few cases of echinococcosis have been unequivocally identified and reported as a consequence of infections. Regarding phylogenetics, the analyses of mitogenomes and nuclear datasets have resulted in discordant topologies, and there is no unequivocal taxonomic classification of species so far. In this work, we sequenced and assembled the genome of that was isolated from agoutis () naturally infected and performed the first comparative genomic study of a neotropical species. The genome assembly consisted of 86.22 Mb which showed ∼90% identity and 76.3% coverage with and contained the 85.0% of the total expected genes. Genetic variants analysis of whole genome revealed a higher rate of intraspecific genetic variability (23,301 SNPs; 0.22 SNPs/kb) rather than for the genomes of and G7 but lower with respect to G1. Comparative genomics against , G1, and G7 revealed 38,762, 125,147, and 170,049 homozygous polymorphic sites, respectively, indicating a higher genetic distance between and species. The SNP distribution in chromosomes revealed a higher SNP density in the longest chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis using whole-genome SNPs demonstrated that is one of the basal species of the genus and is phylogenetically closer to . This work sheds light on the phylogeny and settles the basis to study sylvatic species and their developmental evolutionary features.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2019.00708DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6692484PMC
August 2019

Coupling physiological analysis with proteomic profile to understand the photosynthetic responses of young Euterpe oleracea palms to drought.

Photosynth Res 2019 May 24;140(2):189-205. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Instituto Sócioambiental e dos Recursos Hídricos, Universidade Federal Rural da Amazônia, Belém, PA, 66077-530, Brazil.

This study examined whether drought sensitivity in açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) is associated with reductions in photosynthesis and increasing oxidative stress in response to down-regulation of proteins related to photosynthetic reactions, photorespiration, and antioxidant system. Well-watered (Control) and drought-stressed plants were compared when leaf water potential in stressed plants reached around - 1.5 and - 3.0 MPa, representing moderate and severe drought. Drought caused 84 and 96% decreases in net photosynthetic rate (P) and stomatal conductance. Stress-mediated changes in maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry were unobserved, but drought decreased photochemical quenching, actual quantum yield of PSII electron transport, and apparent electron transport rate (ETR). Moderate and severe drought induced, respectively, decreases and increases in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and 74 and 273% increases in ETR/P. Moderate drought down-regulated PSII protein D2, chlorophyll a-b binding protein 8, photosystem I reaction center subunit N, sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase, and transketolase; while severe drought down-regulated LHC II proteins, ferredoxin-NADP reductase, ATP synthase subunits ε and ß, and carbonic anhydrase isoform X2. The glutamate-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 and glycine dehydrogenase were down-regulated upon moderate drought, while catalase 2 and glycine cleavage system H protein 3 were up-regulated. Severe drought up-regulated glycolate oxidase, glycine cleavage system H protein 3, and aminomethyl transferase, but most of photorespiration-related proteins were only found in control plants. Down-regulation of chaperones and antioxidant enzymes and increased lipid peroxidation in stressed plants were observed upon both stress severities. Therefore, the decreases in P and failure in preventing oxidative damages through adjustments in NPQ and photorespiration- and antioxidant-related proteins accounted for drought sensitivity in açaí.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11120-018-0597-6DOI Listing
May 2019

Differential accumulation of proteins in oil palms affected by fatal yellowing disease.

PLoS One 2018 5;13(4):e0195538. Epub 2018 Apr 5.

Instituto Tecnológico Vale, Belém, Pará, Brazil.

There is still no consensus on the true origin of fatal yellowing, one of the most important diseases affecting oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) plantations. This study involved two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (2D-UPLC-MSE) analyses to identify changes in protein profiles of oil palms affected by FY disease. Oil palm roots were sampled from two growing areas. Differential accumulation of proteins was assessed by comparing plants with and without symptoms and between plants at different stages of FY development. Most of the proteins identified with differential accumulation were those related to stress response and energy metabolism. The latter proteins include the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase, related to alcohol fermentation, which were identified in plants with and without symptoms. The presence of these enzymes suggests an anaerobic condition before or during FY. Transketolase, isoflavone reductase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase, S-adenosylmethionine synthase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and ferritin, among others, were identified as potential marker proteins and could be used to guide selection of FY-tolerant oil palm genotypes or to understand the source of this anomaly. When comparing different stages of FY, we observed high accumulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and other abiotic stress related-proteins at all disease stages. On the other hand, biological stress-related proteins were more accumulated at later stages of the disease. These results suggest that changes in abiotic factors can trigger FY development, creating conditions for the establishment of opportunistic pathogens.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0195538PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5886584PMC
July 2018

Vaginal Microbiome Characterization of Nellore Cattle Using Metagenomic Analysis.

PLoS One 2015 24;10(11):e0143294. Epub 2015 Nov 24.

Departmento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

Understanding of microbial communities inhabiting cattle vaginal tract may lead to a better comprehension of bovine physiology and reproductive health being of great economic interest. Up to date, studies involving cattle microbiota are focused on the gastrointestinal tract, and little is known about the vaginal microbiota. This study aimed to investigate the vaginal microbiome in Nellore cattle, heifers and cows, pregnant and non-pregnant, using a culture independent approach. The main bacterial phyla found were Firmicutes (~40-50%), Bacteroidetes (~15-25%) and Proteobacteria (~5-25%), in addition to ~10-20% of non-classified bacteria. 45-55% of the samples were represented by only ten OTUs: Aeribacillus, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Ruminococcus, Rikenella, Alistipes, Bacillus, Eubacterium, Prevotella and non-classified bacteria. Interestingly, microbiota from all 20 animals could be grouped according to the respiratory metabolism of the main OTUs found, creating three groups of vaginal microbiota in cattle. Archaeal samples were dominated by the Methanobrevibacter genus (Euryarchaeota, ~55-70%). Ascomycota was the main fungal phylum (~80-95%) and Mycosphaerella the most abundant genus (~70-85%). Hormonal influence was not clear, but a tendency for the reduction of bacterial and increase of archaeal populations in pregnant animals was observed. Eukaryotes did not vary significantly between pregnant and non-pregnant animals, but tended to be more abundant on cows than on heifers. The present work describes a great microbial variability in the vaginal community among the evaluated animals and groups (heifers and cows, pregnant and non-pregnant), which is significantly different from the findings previously reported using culture dependent methods, pointing out the need for further studies on this issue. The microbiome found also indicates that the vaginal colonization appears to be influenced by the gastrointestinal community.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0143294PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4657983PMC
June 2016

Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Melipona scutellaris, a Brazilian stingless bee.

Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal 2016 09 23;27(5):3387-8. Epub 2015 Feb 23.

a Institute of Genetics and Biochemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia , Uberlândia , MG , Brazil .

Melipona scutellaris is a Brazilian stingless bee species and a highly important native pollinator besides its use in rational rearing for honey production. In this study, we present the whole mitochondrial DNA sequence of M. scutellaris from a haploid male. The mitogenome has a size of 14,862 bp and harbors 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA genes and 21 tRNA genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/19401736.2015.1018233DOI Listing
September 2016

Microarray analysis of tick-infested skin in resistant and susceptible cattle confirms the role of inflammatory pathways in immune activation and larval rejection.

Vet Parasitol 2014 Sep 23;205(1-2):307-17. Epub 2014 Jul 23.

Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, Embrapa Dairy Cattle, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Electronic address:

Tick bites promote activation of an inflammatory process that is influenced by bovine genetic composition and its history of previous exposure. Taurine and indicine breeds are known to differ on its immune response development against Rhipicephalus microplus. Nevertheless, further investigation about the complex molecular pathways involved in the development of immune response to tick infestation in cattle presenting the same genetic background is mandatory. The aim of this work was to access the early immune response triggered by R. microplus larvae attachment in previously selected resistant and susceptible animals in a bovine F2 population derived from Gyr (Bos indicus)×Holstein (Bos taurus) crosses. Microarray data analysis of RNA samples from tick infested skin was used to evaluate the gene expression at 0, 24 and 48h after R. microplus larvae attachment. Our experimental design allowed us to deeply explore the immune response related to R. microplus infestation avoiding the innate differences between these breeds. The differentially expressed genes found reveal networks and pathways that suggest a key role of lipid metabolism in inflammation control and impairment of tick infestation in resistant animals. Acute phase response also seems to be impaired in susceptible animals. These results provide new insights about early immune response against ticks and raise the possibility of using immunomodulation processes to improve and develop novel tools for tick control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2014.07.018DOI Listing
September 2014

Preliminary characterization of mitochondrial genome of Melipona scutellaris, a Brazilian stingless bee.

Biomed Res Int 2014 16;2014:927546. Epub 2014 Jun 16.

Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Faculdade de Computação, Avenida João Naves de Ávila 2121, Campus Santa Mônica, Bloco 1B, Sala 148, 38400-902 Uberlândia, MG, Brazil.

Bees are manufacturers of relevant economical products and have a pollinator role fundamental to ecosystems. Traditionally, studies focused on the genus Melipona have been mostly based on behavioral, and social organization and ecological aspects. Only recently the evolutionary history of this genus has been assessed using molecular markers, including mitochondrial genes. Even though these studies have shed light on the evolutionary history of the Melipona genus, a more accurate picture may emerge when full nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of Melipona species become available. Here we present the assembly, annotation, and characterization of a draft mitochondrial genome of the Brazilian stingless bee Melipona scutellaris using Melipona bicolor as a reference organism. Using Illumina MiSeq data, we achieved the annotation of all protein coding genes, as well as the genes for the two ribosomal subunits (16S and 12S) and transfer RNA genes as well. Using the COI sequence as a DNA barcode, we found that M. cramptoni is the closest species to M. scutellaris.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/927546DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4082856PMC
September 2015

Xerostomia, hyposalivation and sialadenitis in patients with chronic hepatitis C are not associated with the detection of HCV RNA in saliva or salivary glands.

J Clin Pathol 2010 Nov 5;63(11):1002-7. Epub 2010 Oct 5.

Department of Oral Surgery and Pathology, School of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Objective: Salivary gland disorders in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) have been considered oral extrahepatic manifestations, reinforcing the hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a sialotropic virus. Hence, the authors investigated the prevalence of HCV RNA in saliva and salivary glands and its possible association with xerostomia, hyposalivation and sialadenitis in patients with CHC.

Patients And Methods: In 65 patients with confirmed CHC, the HCV RNA was investigated by nested RT-PCR in saliva samples and minor salivary glands. Xerostomia, hyposalivation, clinical and histopathological evidence of sialadenitis were also evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to verify associations.

Results: HCV RNA was detected in the saliva of 26/65 (40.0%) patients and in 12/65 (18.5%) salivary glands. Xerostomia was reported by 23/65 (35.4%) patients, and hyposalivation was diagnosed in 13/65 (20.0%) patients. Sialadenitis was confirmed by histopathological features in 31/65 (47.7%) patients. Twelve (38.7%) of the 31 patients with sialadenitis presented HCV RNA in saliva and 2/31 (6.5%) in salivary glands. No associations were found between xerostomia, hyposalivation or sialadenitis and the detection of HCV RNA in saliva or in salivary glands.

Conclusions: Although xerostomia, hyposalivation and sialadenitis are frequent findings in CHC patients, our study did not confirm the association between the detection of HCV RNA in saliva or salivary glands with these salivary gland disorders. However, an indirect role of HCV by immune-mediated virus mechanisms in the pathogenesis of salivary gland disorders in this group of patients cannot be ruled out.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2010.080036DOI Listing
November 2010

Detection of HCV RNA in saliva does not correlate with salivary flow or xerostomia in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2010 Jun;109(6):851-6

Department of Oral Surgery and Pathology, School of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in saliva and its possible association with xerostomia and hyposalivation in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

Study Design: One hundred and thirty-six patients with confirmed diagnosis of chronic hepatitis C were prospectively analyzed before HCV treatment. The prevalence of xerostomia and hyposalivation was clinically evaluated. HCV RNA was investigated in saliva samples by qualitative PCR test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to verify associations.

Results: Xerostomia was reported by 48 (35.3%) patients, whereas hyposalivation was observed in 26 (19.1%). HCV RNA was positive in the saliva of 53 (39.0%) patients. An association among HCV RNA-positive saliva with xerostomia or hyposalivation was not observed.

Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that the detection of HCV in saliva does not correlate with salivary flow or xerostomia in patients with chronic hepatitis C.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2010.02.012DOI Listing
June 2010

Survey of genome organization and gene content of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

Microbiol Res 2010 May 31;165(4):312-20. Epub 2009 Aug 31.

Laboratório de Genética Celular e Molecular, Departamento Biologia Geral, ICB-UFMG, Brazil.

Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen that causes Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) disease in sheep and goats. The widespread occurrence and the economic importance of this pathogen have prompted investigation of its pathogenesis. We used a genomic library of C. pseudotuberculosis to generate 1440 genomic survey sequences (GSSs); these were analyzed in silico with bioinformatics tools, using public databases for comparative analyses. We employed non-redundant unique sequences as a query for BLAST searches against the genome, the translated genome and the proteome of four other Corynebacterium species that have been completely sequenced. We were able to characterize approximately 8% of the genome of C. pseudotuberculosis, including previously undescribed functional group genes, based on the COG database; the GSSs classification into categories gave 13% information storage and processing, 14% cellular processes and 23% metabolism. We found a close relation between C. pseudotuberculosis and C. diphtheriae conserved-gene synteny in Corynebacteria species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micres.2009.05.009DOI Listing
May 2010

[The molecular bases of hemophilia A. ].

Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) 2009 Mar-Apr;55(2):213-9

Centro de Pesquisas Renè Rachou, FIOCRUZ.

Hemophilias are bleeding disorders due to deficiency of the blood coagulation factor VIII (hemophilia A) or factor IX (hemophilia B), resulting from mutation on the gene coding for factor VIII or factor IX. Hemophilia A is more frequent than hemophilia B and affects 1:10,000 male newborns. The severity and frequency of hemorrhagic episodes is related to residual activity of factor VIII present in the plasma and relates to the type of mutation associated with the disorder. Cloning of the factor VIII gene has enabled researchers to better understand the molecular basis of hemophilia A, accounting to date, for more than 1,000 mutations associated with the disease. This comprehensive knowledge permits an improved comprehension of the genotype-phenotype relation, establishment of clinical policies when mutations related to higher risk of inhibitors development are known, identification of hemophilia carriers in case of women related to patients, implementation of a program of genetic counseling and discovery of structural-functional relationship between gene-protein. This article aims to review the molecular basis of hemophilia A, laboratory techniques used to characterize mutations and clinical implications involved in the molecular diagnosis of hemophilia A.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0104-42302009000200029DOI Listing
May 2010

The Tropical Biominer Project: mining old sources for new drugs.

OMICS 2005 ;9(2):130-8

Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou, Barro Preto, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil., Homologix, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

The Tropical Biominer Project is a recent initiative from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) and the Oswaldo Cruz foundation, with the participation of the Biominas Foundation (Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil) and the start-up Homologix. The main objective of the project is to build a new resource for the chemogenomics research, on chemical compounds, with a strong emphasis on natural molecules. Adopted technologies include the search of information from structured, semi-structured, and non-structured documents (the last two from the web) and datamining tools in order to gather information from different sources. The database is the support for developing applications to find new potential treatments for parasitic infections by using virtual screening tools. We present here the midpoint of the project: the conception and implementation of the Tropical Biominer Database. This is a Federated Database designed to store data from different resources. Connected to the database, a web crawler is able to gather information from distinct, patented web sites and store them after automatic classification using datamining tools. Finally, we demonstrate the interest of the approach, by formulating new hypotheses on specific targets of a natural compound, violacein, using inferences from a Virtual Screening procedure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/omi.2005.9.130DOI Listing
September 2005
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