Publications by authors named "Gudrun Wagner"

56 Publications

Short-Term Outcome of Inpatient Treatment for Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa Using DSM-5 Remission Criteria.

J Clin Med 2021 Jul 20;10(14). Epub 2021 Jul 20.

Eating Disorders Unit, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

This study evaluated the short-term outcome of a multimodal inpatient treatment concept for adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN). In this prospective observational study, a cohort of 126 female adolescents with AN (age range: 11-17, mean age: 14.83) was longitudinally followed from admission to discharge (average duration of stay: 77 days). We used gold-standard clinical interviews and self-report data, as well as DSM-5 remission criteria, to evaluate the treatment outcome. From admission to discharge, body-mass-index (BMI) significantly improved by 2.6 kg/m. Data from clinical interviews and self-reports yielded similar improvements in restraint eating and eating concerns (large effects). Lower effects were observed for variables assessing weight/shape concerns and drive for thinness. At discharge, 23.2% of patients showed full remission of AN, 31.3% partial remission, and 45.5% no remission according to DSM-5 criteria. Differences in remission groups were found regarding AN severity, age at admission, and use of antidepressant medication. Living with both parents, longer duration of inpatient treatment and the use of antipsychotic medication were significantly associated with higher BMI change. The findings provide evidence for the short-term effectiveness of our inpatient treatment concept. We recommend using DSM-5 based remission criteria to evaluate the treatment outcome to improve the comparability of studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10143190DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8307185PMC
July 2021

Online interventions to prevent mental health problems implemented in school settings: the perspectives from key stakeholders in Austria and Spain.

Eur J Public Health 2021 07;31(31 Suppl 1):i71-i79

Ferdinand Porsche FernFH-Distance Learning University of Applied Sciences, Wiener Neustadt, Austria.

Background: Schools are key settings for delivering mental illness prevention in adolescents. Data on stakeholders' attitudes and factors relevant for the implementation of Internet-based prevention programmes are scarce.

Methods: Stakeholders in the school setting from Austria and Spain were consulted. Potential facilitators (e.g. teachers and school psychologists) completed an online questionnaire (N=50), policy makers (e.g. representatives of the ministry of education and health professional associations) participated in semi-structured interviews (N=9) and pupils (N=29, 14-19 years) participated in focus groups. Thematic analysis was used to identify experiences with, attitudes and needs towards Internet-based prevention programmes, underserved groups, as well as barriers and facilitators for reach, adoption, implementation and maintenance.

Results: Experiences with Internet-based prevention programmes were low across all stakeholder groups. Better reach of the target groups was seen as main advantage whereas lack of personal contact, privacy concerns, risk for misuse and potential stigmatization when implemented during school hours were regarded as disadvantages. Relevant needs towards Internet-based programmes involved attributes of the development process, general requirements for safety and performance, presentation of content, media/tools and contact options of online programmes. Positive attitudes of school staff, low effort for schools and compatibility to schools' curriculum were seen as key factors for successful adoption and implementation. A sound implementation of the programme in the school routine and continued improvement could facilitate maintenance of online prevention initiatives in schools.

Conclusions: Attitudes towards Internet-based mental illness prevention programmes in school settings are positive across all stakeholder groups. However, especially safety concerns have to be considered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckab039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8266540PMC
July 2021

Online prevention programmes for university students: stakeholder perspectives from six European countries.

Eur J Public Health 2021 07;31(31 Suppl 1):i64-i70

King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK.

Background: Students beginning university are at a heightened risk for developing mental health disorders. Online prevention and early intervention programmes targeting mental health have the potential to reduce this risk, however, previous research has shown uptake to be rather poor. Understanding university stakeholders' (e.g. governing level and delivery staff [DS] and students) views and attitudes towards such online prevention programmes could help with their development, implementation and dissemination within university settings.

Methods: Semi-structured interviews, focus groups and online surveys were completed with staff at a governing level, university students and DS (i.e. student health or teaching staff) from six European countries. They were asked about their experiences with, and needs and attitudes towards, online prevention programmes, as well as the factors that influence the translation of these programmes into real-world settings. Results were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Results: Participating stakeholders knew little about online prevention programmes for university settings; however, they viewed them as acceptable. The main themes to emerge were the basic conditions and content of the programmes, the awareness and engagement, the resources needed, the usability and the responsibility and ongoing efforts to increase reach.

Conclusions: Overall, although these stakeholders had little knowledge about online prevention programmes, they were open to the idea of introducing them. They could see the potential benefits that these programmes might bring to a university setting as a whole and the individual students and staff members.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckab040DOI Listing
July 2021

Does a Skills Intervention for Parents Have a Positive Impact on Adolescents' Anorexia Nervosa Outcome? Answers from a Quasi-Randomised Feasibility Trial of SUCCEAT.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 04 27;18(9). Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Eating Disorders Unit, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

Skills trainings for caregivers of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) have been proven to be effective in improving caregiver skills and reducing caregivers' psychopathology. The effects on patients, especially adolescents, are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a caregivers' skills training program (Supporting Carers of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders in Austria, SUCCEAT, workshop or online version) on adolescents with AN delivered as workshops (WS) or online (ONL). Outcomes are Body-Mass-Index (BMI) percentile, eating psychopathology (Eating Disorder Examination, EDE), attitudinal and behavioural dimensions of eating disorders (Eating Disorder Inventory-2), motivation to change (AN Stages of Change Questionnaire), emotional and behavioural problems (Youth Self-Report) and quality of life (KINDL). All outcome variables significantly improved across both SUCCEAT groups (WS and ONL) and were sustained at 12-month follow-up. The online and workshop delivery of SUCCEAT were equally effective. Most effect sizes were in the medium-to-high range. Full or partial remission was observed in 72% (WS) and 87% (ONL) of patients. Caregiver skills trainings, either delivered as workshops or online modules, are highly recommended to complement treatment as usual.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094656DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8124826PMC
April 2021

Impact of COVID-19 Confinement on Adolescent Patients with Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Interview Study Involving Adolescents and Parents.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 04 16;18(8). Epub 2021 Apr 16.

Eating Disorder Unit, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

COVID-19-related restrictions may have a serious impact on patients with eating disorders. We conducted semistructured interviews with female adolescent patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) ( = 13, 13-18 years) currently receiving inpatient or outpatient treatment and their parents ( = 10). We asked for their experiences during COVID-19 confinement regarding everyday life, AN symptoms, and treatment. We used thematic analysis to interpret the data. The main themes identified from the patients' interviews involved restrictions of personal freedom (i.e., leading to tension between patients and family members, reduced motivation to work on recovery), interruption of the treatment routine (emerging risks through self-monitored weight, challenges/opportunities of teletherapy), changes in AN symptoms (more exposure to triggering situations), COVID-19-related fears, and compulsions but also potential opportunities (less stress, better family relationships). The parents discussed changes in daily routines as negative (challenges in maintaining day structures) and positive (more family time, "slowing down"). They expressed reservations about reduced outpatient monitoring and increased teletherapy and discussed challenges in keeping contact with the child and clinicians during inpatient treatment. Moreover, the parents discussed deteriorations and improvements in the patients' psychopathology. Clinical implications from these in-depth insights include the importance of strengthening communication between changing staff cohorts, patients, and parents; motivational work; and joint weight monitoring with the therapist.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084251DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8074137PMC
April 2021

The Maudsley model of anorexia nervosa treatment for adolescents and young adults (MANTRa): a study protocol for a multi-center cohort study.

J Eat Disord 2021 Mar 8;9(1):33. Epub 2021 Mar 8.

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, 1090, Vienna, Austria.

Background: The treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) is often challenging due to medical complications as well as high relapse and mortality rates. Studies about effective treatment options for people with AN are particularly scarce in the adolescent population. This paper is a study protocol for a multi-center cohort study assessing the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of a new, manualized treatment program, the "Maudsley Model of Anorexia Nervosa Treatment for Adolescents and Young Adults" (MANTRa) compared to psychotherapeutic treatment as usual (TAU).

Methods/design: One hundred patients between 13 and 21 years who meet the inclusion criteria will receive 24 to 34 individual weekly MANTRa therapy sessions or weekly TAU sessions. Primary outcome variables will be BMI and eating disorder psychopathology 12 months after baseline. Further changes in central coherence, cognitive flexibility, emotion recognition, comorbid psychopathology (e.g. depression, obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders, non-suicidal self-injury), personality factors and therapeutic alliance will be assessed.

Discussion: This multi-center study will examine the utility of the treatment program MANTRa for adolescents with AN and, therefore enhances the current knowledge about potential treatments for this patient group.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03535714 . Registered: 24/05/2018 (retrospectively registered, still recruiting).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40337-021-00387-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7941930PMC
March 2021

Less ready for adulthood?-Turner syndrome has an impact on transition readiness.

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 2020 10 14;93(4):449-455. Epub 2020 Aug 14.

Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Paediatric Pulmology, Allergology and Endocrinology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Objective: Young women with Turner syndrome (TS) are known to be at risk for loss to medical follow-up. Recent literature indicates that there are disparities regarding transition readiness between different chronic conditions. So far, studies in young women with TS investigating their transition readiness compared to youths with other chronic conditions with no or minor neurocognitive challenges have not been reported.

Methods: Patients (n = 52), 26 patients with Turner syndrome (mean age 17.24 ± 2.10) and 26 controls with type 1 diabetes or a rheumatic disease (mean age 17.41 ± 2.44), were recruited from specialized paediatric endocrine outpatient clinics. The Transition Readiness Assessment Questionnaire TRAQ-GV-15 was used to compare transition readiness scores between TS and controls. In addition, information on individual handling of the questionnaire was obtained. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric methods were used to analyse the data.

Results: Significant differences for transition readiness scores were found between the two study groups. The global TRAQ-GV-15 score was significantly lower for females with TS. In particular, subscale 1 'autonomy' of the TRAQ-GV-15 showed lower scores in patients with TS. Patients with TS needed significantly more help and more time to complete the questionnaire.

Conclusion: Special attention should be given to young women with Turner syndrome in the preparation for the transitional phase. By incorporating the assessment of transition readiness specialists will find it easier to identify underdeveloped skills and knowledge gaps in their patients. Unless a multidisciplinary young adult clinic is established, an older age than 18 years at transfer to adult endocrine care might be beneficial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cen.14293DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7540424PMC
October 2020

Students' perceptions of an online mental health intervention: a qualitative interview study.

Neuropsychiatr 2020 Dec 28. Epub 2020 Dec 28.

Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, Box P059, SE5 8AF, London, UK.

Background: University students are at a heightened risk of developing mental health disorders. Online interventions are becoming increasingly popular in this target group, both to prevent the development of mental health disorders and to treat existing ones. The PLUS (Personality and Living of University Students) programme is a web-based targeted prevention intervention which has been tested across two European countries. Completion of this programme has been relatively poor. Understanding university students' opinions, experiences and perceptions of the PLUS programme can lead to future improvements in intervention design, engagement and dissemination.

Methods: Semistructured interviews were conducted with university students from the UK (n = 10) and Austria (n = 14) who had previously had access to PLUS. Students were asked about their perception and experiences of the programme, and how it could be improved. Results were analysed using thematic analysis.

Results: Experience of online prevention programmes in general were limited and as a result of this, few had specific expectations of the PLUS programme before signing up. The lack of guidance and accountability due to the online nature of the programme made engagement challenging for many, however, frequent reminder emails helped mitigate this. In terms of positives of the programme, participants found the flexibility suitable for students and many noticed that the programme created change in how they thought or behaved.

Conclusion: Overall, the PLUS programme was well received by students, despite study retention being poor. Although PLUS was viewed as a useful tool to integrate into the university setting, several improvements were suggested to increase engagement. By considering this feedback, uptake and intervention completion can be improved for future preventative interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40211-020-00383-5DOI Listing
December 2020

A German version of the Caregiver Skills scale for caregivers of patients with anorexia nervosa.

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2021 Mar 17;29(2):257-268. Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Department for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Eating Disorders Unit, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Objective: To investigate acceptance, reliability, convergent validity, factor structure and sensitivity to change of a German translation of the Caregiver Skills (CASK) scale measuring skills related to caring for patients with eating disorders.

Methods: Two hundred and thirty-three parents (76% female) of adolescent patients (mean age 15.1) with anorexia nervosa (AN) completed the 27 items of the CASK. We calculated item/scale characteristics, internal consistencies and bivariate correlations with other measures of caregiving burden. We evaluated goodness-of-fit of the 6-factor model using confirmatory factors analysis and explored the sensitivity to change following two skills-based trainings.

Results: The fit of the 6-factor model was acceptable (Root Mean Square Error of Approximation: 0.077, Standard Root Mean Square Residual: 0.080). Cronbach's alpha was excellent for the total (.94) and acceptable for all subscales (0.73-0.85). The total CASK score was 68.04 (max. 100) showing relatively high self-rated caregiver skills. Non-completion rates of most items were low (<3%) indicating high acceptance. Convergent validity was found with measures of psychological distress, depression, anxiety and expressed emotion. The total score significantly increased following an 8-week workshop/online skills training (d = 0.70) and a 2-day multi-family intervention (d = 0.47).

Discussion: The German CASK version is a useful instrument to assess caregiver skills in parents of patients with AN and to evaluate outcomes of skills-based trainings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2817DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7986839PMC
March 2021

Eating disorders in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Curr Opin Psychiatry 2020 11;33(6):602-610

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Purpose Of Review: Eating disorders represent one of the most common psychiatric disorders in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), with a prevalence twice as high as in individuals without diabetes. The increased risk for acute and long-term medical complications and a three-fold mortality rate with this dual condition makes it extremely important to screen adolescents for eating disorders as soon as possible.

Recent Findings: A number of 13 surveys in the last two years focussed on prevalence rates of disordered eating and associations with sociodemographic, eating disorder-specific and diabetes-related factors in this population. Variations in study design, sample size, age range, sex, instruments to assess eating disorders and outcome make comparisons difficult. Healthcare professionals report challenges in detecting and treating adolescents with this dual condition because of a lack of validated screening tools, guidelines, and integration across specialist care. Studies on psychological treatments for the comorbidity of eating disorders and T1DM are scarce, especially for adolescents.

Summary: The development and evaluation of psychological treatments for adolescents with eating disorders and T1DM are urgently needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/YCO.0000000000000650DOI Listing
November 2020

Reduction of High Expressed Emotion and Treatment Outcomes in Anorexia Nervosa-Caregivers' and Adolescents' Perspective.

J Clin Med 2020 Jun 27;9(7). Epub 2020 Jun 27.

Eating Disorders Unit, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

High expressed emotion (EE) is common in caregivers of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and associated with poorer outcome for patients. In this study, we examined the prevalence of high EE in caregivers of adolescents with AN and analyzed predictors for EE using multivariate linear regression models. We further analyzed whether EE is reduced by the "Supporting Carers of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders in Austria" (SUCCEAT) intervention using general linear mixed models and whether a reduction of EE predicts patients' outcomes. Caregivers were randomly allocated to the SUCCEAT workshop ( = 50) or online intervention ( = 50) and compared to a comparison group ( = 49). EE and patients' outcomes were assessed at the baseline, post-intervention, and at the 12-month follow-up. Up to 47% of caregivers showed high EE. Lower caregiver skills, higher AN symptom impact, higher levels of depression and motivation to change in caregivers were significant predictors for high EE. EE significantly decreased in the SUCCEAT groups and the comparison group according to the caregivers', but not the patients' perspective. The level of reduction could partially predict subjective improvement and improvement in clinically assessed AN symptoms and body mass index of patients. Implementing interventions for caregivers addressing EE in the treatment of adolescents with AN is strongly recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9072021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7409203PMC
June 2020

Long-Term Efficacy of the Workshop Vs. Online SUCCEAT (Supporting Carers of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders) Intervention for Parents: A Quasi-Randomised Feasibility Trial.

J Clin Med 2020 Jun 18;9(6). Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Eating Disorders Unit, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

Interventions for main carers of adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) can reduce the caregiving burden and increase caregiver skills. However, the effectiveness and feasibility for carers of adolescent patients, the optimal form of the intervention and long-term outcomes are largely unknown. We evaluated the efficacy and feasibility of the "Supporting Carers of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders in Austria" (SUCCEAT) workshop vs. online intervention. Main caregivers (parents) of adolescent patients with AN were randomly allocated to a workshop ( = 50) or online version ( = 50). Participants were compared to a non-randomised comparison group ( = 49) receiving multi-family or systemic family therapy. Primary (General Health Questionnaire) and secondary outcomes were obtained at baseline, three-month and 12-month follow-up. Adherence was high for workshop and online participants (6.2 and 6.7 sessions completed out of 8). Intention-to-treat analyses revealed significant pre-post reductions in the primary outcome for the workshop (d = 0.87 (95%conficence interval (CI): 0.48; 1.26)) and online (d = 0.65 (95%CI: 0.31; 0.98)) intervention that were sustained at the 12-month follow-up. There was no significant group difference ( = 0.473). Parental psychopathology and burden decreased and caregiver skills increased in all groups; the improvement of caregiver skills was significantly higher in SUCCEAT participants than in the comparison group. Online interventions for parents of adolescents with AN were equally effective as workshops. The improvements remained stable over time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061912DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7355675PMC
June 2020

Shared genetic risk between eating disorder- and substance-use-related phenotypes: Evidence from genome-wide association studies.

Addict Biol 2021 01 16;26(1):e12880. Epub 2020 Feb 16.

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.

Eating disorders and substance use disorders frequently co-occur. Twin studies reveal shared genetic variance between liabilities to eating disorders and substance use, with the strongest associations between symptoms of bulimia nervosa and problem alcohol use (genetic correlation [r ], twin-based = 0.23-0.53). We estimated the genetic correlation between eating disorder and substance use and disorder phenotypes using data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Four eating disorder phenotypes (anorexia nervosa [AN], AN with binge eating, AN without binge eating, and a bulimia nervosa factor score), and eight substance-use-related phenotypes (drinks per week, alcohol use disorder [AUD], smoking initiation, current smoking, cigarettes per day, nicotine dependence, cannabis initiation, and cannabis use disorder) from eight studies were included. Significant genetic correlations were adjusted for variants associated with major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. Total study sample sizes per phenotype ranged from ~2400 to ~537 000 individuals. We used linkage disequilibrium score regression to calculate single nucleotide polymorphism-based genetic correlations between eating disorder- and substance-use-related phenotypes. Significant positive genetic associations emerged between AUD and AN (r = 0.18; false discovery rate q = 0.0006), cannabis initiation and AN (r = 0.23; q < 0.0001), and cannabis initiation and AN with binge eating (r = 0.27; q = 0.0016). Conversely, significant negative genetic correlations were observed between three nondiagnostic smoking phenotypes (smoking initiation, current smoking, and cigarettes per day) and AN without binge eating (r = -0.19 to -0.23; qs < 0.04). The genetic correlation between AUD and AN was no longer significant after co-varying for major depressive disorder loci. The patterns of association between eating disorder- and substance-use-related phenotypes highlights the potentially complex and substance-specific relationships among these behaviors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12880DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7429266PMC
January 2021

Prevalence and burden of headache in children and adolescents in Austria - a nationwide study in a representative sample of pupils aged 10-18 years.

J Headache Pain 2019 Nov 6;20(1):101. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Dr Gönül Bingöl-Dr Muammer Bingöl Çocuk ve Ergen Başağrısı Derneği, Society for Headache in Children and Adolescents, Tan Sokak 2/7, Suadiye, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: Headache disorders are highly prevalent worldwide, but not so well investigated in children and adolescents as in adults: few studies have included representative nationwide samples. No data exist for Austria until now. In a representative sample of children and adolescents in Austria, we estimated the prevalence and attributable burden of headache disorders, including the new diagnostic category of "undifferentiated headache" (UdH) defined as mild headache lasting less than 1 hour.

Methods: Within the context of a broader national mental health survey, children and adolescents aged 10-18 years were recruited from purposively selected schools. Mediated self-completed questionnaires included sociodemographic enquiry (gender, age, socioeconomic status, family constellation, residence [urban or rural] and migration background). Prevalence and attributable burden of all headache, UdH, migraine (definite plus probable), tension-type headache (TTH: definite plus probable) and headache on ≥15 days/month (H15+) were assessed using the Headache-Attributed Restriction, Disability, Social Handicap and Impaired Participation (HARDSHIP) questionnaire for children and adolescents. Health-related quality of life (HrQoL) was assessed using the KIDSCREEN questionnaire.

Results: Of 7643 selected pupils, 3386 (44.3%) completed the questionnaires. The 1-year prevalence of headache was 75.7%, increasing with age and higher in girls (82.1%) than in boys (67.7%; p < 0.001). UdH, migraine, TTH and H15+ were reported by 26.1%, 24.2%, 21.6% and 3.0% of participants. Attributable burden was high, with 42% of those with headache experiencing restrictions in daily activities. Medication use (50% overall) was highest in H15+ (67%) and still considerable in UdH (29%). HrQoL was reduced for all headache types except UdH. Participants in single parent or patchwork families had a higher probability of migraine (respectively, OR 1.5, p < 0.001; OR 1.5, p < 0.01). Participants with a migration background had a lower probability of TTH (OR 0.7, p < 0.01).

Conclusions: Headache disorders are both very common and highly burdensome in children and adolescents in Austria. This study contributes to the global atlas of headache disorders in these age groups, and corroborates and adds knowledge of the new yet common and important diagnostic category of UdH. The findings call for action in national and international health policies, and for further epidemiological research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s10194-019-1050-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6836380PMC
November 2019

Genome-wide association study identifies eight risk loci and implicates metabo-psychiatric origins for anorexia nervosa.

Nat Genet 2019 08 15;51(8):1207-1214. Epub 2019 Jul 15.

Clinical Genetics Unit, Department of Woman and Child Health, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.

Characterized primarily by a low body-mass index, anorexia nervosa is a complex and serious illness, affecting 0.9-4% of women and 0.3% of men, with twin-based heritability estimates of 50-60%. Mortality rates are higher than those in other psychiatric disorders, and outcomes are unacceptably poor. Here we combine data from the Anorexia Nervosa Genetics Initiative (ANGI) and the Eating Disorders Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC-ED) and conduct a genome-wide association study of 16,992 cases of anorexia nervosa and 55,525 controls, identifying eight significant loci. The genetic architecture of anorexia nervosa mirrors its clinical presentation, showing significant genetic correlations with psychiatric disorders, physical activity, and metabolic (including glycemic), lipid and anthropometric traits, independent of the effects of common variants associated with body-mass index. These results further encourage a reconceptualization of anorexia nervosa as a metabo-psychiatric disorder. Elucidating the metabolic component is a critical direction for future research, and paying attention to both psychiatric and metabolic components may be key to improving outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0439-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6779477PMC
August 2019

Healthy Teens @ School: Evaluating and disseminating transdiagnostic preventive interventions for eating disorders and obesity for adolescents in school settings.

Internet Interv 2019 Apr 27;16:65-75. Epub 2018 Feb 27.

FernFH Distance Learning University of Applied Sciences, Wiener Neustadt, Austria.

Background: The worldwide prevalence of overweight and obesity is at alarming levels. Nearly one in three children in Europe is overweight or obese. Disordered eating and body image concerns are equally widespread and increase risk for more chronic and severe weight-related problems. Research has shown that online interventions that address both healthy weight regulation and body image can reduce risk for eating disorders and obesity simultaneously and are feasible to implement in school settings. To date, evaluation and dissemination of such programs in Europe is scant.

Methods: The study is a multi-country cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing the effectiveness of an unguided, online, multi-level intervention for promoting a healthy lifestyle and reducing problematic eating behavior, eating disorder and obesity risk among students aged 14 to 19 years with control condition. As part of the Horizon 2020 funded project ICare (GA No. 634757) the trial is conducted in Austria and Spain. Cluster randomization by school is used. The intervention is an adapted version of an evidence-based program developed in the USA (StayingFit). Participants of the intervention group are assigned to one of two possible program tracks based on the results of the initial online-assessment: Overweight adolescents are assigned to the "Weight Management" track emphasizing balanced eating and exercise for weight maintenance, and all other individuals are assigned to the "Healthy Habits" track which aims at promoting healthy habits related to e.g., nutrition, physical activity, sleep. The participants of both tracks work on ten modules (one 20-30 min module per week) during school hours and/or at home. Assessments are conducted at pre- and post-intervention, and at 6- and 12-months after baseline assessment. The primary outcome is intuitive eating, secondary outcomes are eating disorder symptomatology, body image concerns, body mass index, food intake, physical activity, self-esteem, stress coping, depression, and anxiety. Following the initial assessment, individuals in the control group do not have access to the prevention program but continue as normal and are only prompted to the assessments at all time points. At the end of the 12-month study they will get access to the program.

Discussion: The results from this study will add to the understanding of how to address eating and weight related problems in adolescents and will shed light on the feasibility of implementing online prevention programs in school routine in Austria and Spain. As part of the larger ICare project this RCT will determine how an adapted version of StayingFit is disseminated within Europe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2018.02.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364512PMC
April 2019

Web-based indicated prevention of common mental disorders in university students in four European countries - Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

Internet Interv 2019 Apr 15;16:35-42. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Section of Eating Disorders, PO59, 16 De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom.

Background: Mental disorders and their symptoms are highly prevalent in the university student population, and the transition from secondary to tertiary education is associated with a rise in mental health problems. Existing web-based interventions for the prevention of common mental disorders in student populations often focus on just one disorder and have not been designed specifically for students. There is thus a need for transdiagnostic, student-specific preventative interventions that can be widely disseminated. This two-arm, parallel group randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a web-based transdiagnostic mental health problem prevention programme (PLUS) across several universities in four countries.

Method: Students ( = 5550) will be recruited through a variety of channels and asked to complete a personality assessment to determine whether they are at high risk for developing common mental disorders. Students at high risk will be randomly allocated to either PLUS or a control intervention, which provides practical support around issues commonly experienced at university. Students at low risk will be allocated to the control intervention. Both intervention groups will be assessed at baseline, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months after randomisation. Depression and generalised anxiety, assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire and the Generalised Anxiety Disorder scales, will form the primary outcomes in this study. Secondary outcome measures include alcohol and drug use, eating behaviour, self-esteem, and quality of life. The cost-effectiveness of the intervention will also be evaluated.

Conclusions: This study will contribute to understanding the role of transdiagnostic indicated web-based interventions for the prevention of common mental disorders in university students. It will also be one of the first studies to investigate the cost-effectiveness of such interventions.

Trial Registration: This trial was registered in the ISRCTN register (ISRCTN15570935) on 12th February 2016.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2018.02.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364328PMC
April 2019

Association of insulin-manipulation and psychiatric disorders: A systematic epidemiological evaluation of adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Austria.

Pediatr Diabetes 2019 02 26;20(1):127-136. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Background/objective: The aim of this study was to systematically assess the association of insulin-manipulation (intentional under- and/or overdosing of insulin), psychiatric comorbidity and diabetes complications.

Methods: Two diagnostic interviews (Diabetes-Self-Management-Patient-Interview and Children's-Diagnostic-Interview for Psychiatric Disorders) were conducted with 241 patients (age 10-22) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) from 21 randomly selected Austrian diabetes care centers. Medical data was derived from medical records.

Results: Psychiatric comorbidity was found in nearly half of the patients with insulin-manipulation (46.3%) compared to a rate of 17.5% in patients, adherent to the prescribed insulin therapy. Depression (18.3% vs 4.9%), specific phobia (21.1% vs 2.9%), social phobia (7.0% vs 0%), and eating disorders (12.7% vs 1.9%) were elevated in patients with insulin-manipulation. Females (37.7%) were more often diagnosed (P = 0.001) with psychiatric disorders than males (18.4%). In females, the percentage of psychiatric comorbidity significantly increased with the level of non-adherence to insulin therapy. Insulin-manipulation had an effect of +0.89% in HbA1c (P = <0.001) compared to patients adherent to insulin therapy, while there was no association of psychiatric comorbidity with metabolic control (HbA1c 8.16% vs 8.12% [65.68 vs 65.25 mmol/mol]). Ketoacidosis, severe hypoglycemia, and frequency of outpatient visits in a diabetes center were highest in patients with insulin-manipulation.

Conclusions: This is the first study using a systematic approach to assess the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients who do or do not manipulate insulin in terms of intentional under- and/or overdosing. Internalizing psychiatric disorders were associated with insulin-manipulation, especially in female patients and insulin-manipulation was associated with deteriorated metabolic control and diabetes complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pedi.12784DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7379731PMC
February 2019

Prevalence of emotional and behavioral problems and subthreshold psychiatric disorders in Austrian adolescents and the need for prevention.

Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 2018 Dec 29;53(12):1325-1337. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Department for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria.

Purpose: Epidemiological data are crucial to plan adequate prevention strategies. Thus, this study aims at obtaining the prevalence of mental health problems (MHP) and subthreshold psychiatric disorders based on a representative sample of Austrian adolescents.

Methods: Adolescents aged 10-18 were recruited from Austrian schools. Emotional and behavioral problems were determined using the Youth Self-Report (YSR); the point prevalence of subthreshold psychiatric disorders was assessed using structured diagnostic interviews. Sociodemographic variables including socioeconomic background, migration status, family structure, and place of residence were obtained. In addition, a non-school sample (unemployed adolescents, and child and adolescent psychiatry patients) was included to enhance representativeness and generalizability.

Results: 3446 students, 37 unemployed adolescents, and 125 child and adolescent psychiatric patients provided analyzable YSR data sets. In the school sample, 16.5% scored in the clinically relevant range, while internalizing problems were more prevalent (17.8%) than externalizing problems (7.4%). These prevalences increased by 0.7-2.0% when the non-school sample was taken into account. A low socioeconomic status (SES) and living in single parent families were associated with higher problem scores. Regarding the interviewed sample (377 students and 407 parents), subthreshold psychiatric disorders were observed in 12.7% of students. 92.5% of them have not yet received any kind of help.

Conclusions: A significant proportion of Austrian adolescents are at risk for MHP. A non-responder analysis indicates that the observed prevalence may be even underestimated. These findings emphasize the urgent need for targeted prevention, especially for reducing anxiety and depressive symptoms and for adolescents in disadvantaged families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00127-018-1586-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6267139PMC
December 2018

The Mental Health in Austrian Teenagers (MHAT) Study: design, methodology, description of study population.

Neuropsychiatr 2018 Sep 15;32(3):121-132. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Health Promotion Research, Vienna, Austria.

Profound epidemiological data on the prevalence of mental health disorders and respective risk and protective factors is a prerequisite for adequate prevention, intervention and service planning. Children and adolescents are regarded as high priority groups for prevention in this field because of the high chronicity and individual burden of mental health disorders. The Mental Health in Austrian Teenagers (MHAT)-Study is the first epidemiological study based on a large representative sample of adolescents (N > 3700) in Austria in order to obtain the prevalence of a wide range of behavioral problems and psychiatric disorders. Adolescents are recruited from multiple settings (schools, course providers for early school leavers and psychiatric clinics) in order to enhance the representativity of the sample. A "gold-standard" two-stage design (screening questionnaire and diagnostic interviews) is used to obtain psychiatric diagnoses that are based on the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders which was published by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013. This paper aims at presenting the study design and methodology of the MHAT study, describing the study population as well as discussing relevant strengths and limitations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40211-018-0273-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6132433PMC
September 2018

Analysis of shared heritability in common disorders of the brain.

Science 2018 06;360(6395)

Department of Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.

Disorders of the brain can exhibit considerable epidemiological comorbidity and often share symptoms, provoking debate about their etiologic overlap. We quantified the genetic sharing of 25 brain disorders from genome-wide association studies of 265,218 patients and 784,643 control participants and assessed their relationship to 17 phenotypes from 1,191,588 individuals. Psychiatric disorders share common variant risk, whereas neurological disorders appear more distinct from one another and from the psychiatric disorders. We also identified significant sharing between disorders and a number of brain phenotypes, including cognitive measures. Further, we conducted simulations to explore how statistical power, diagnostic misclassification, and phenotypic heterogeneity affect genetic correlations. These results highlight the importance of common genetic variation as a risk factor for brain disorders and the value of heritability-based methods in understanding their etiology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aap8757DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6097237PMC
June 2018

Supporting Carers of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders in Austria (SUCCEAT): Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2018 09 6;26(5):447-461. Epub 2018 May 6.

Eating Disorders Unit, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Supporting Carers of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders in Austria (SUCCEAT) is an intervention for carers of children and adolescents with anorexia nervosa and atypical anorexia nervosa. This paper describes the study protocol for a randomised controlled trial including the process and economic evaluation. Carers are randomly allocated to one of the 2 SUCCEAT intervention formats, either 8 weekly 2-hr workshop sessions (n = 48) or web-based modules (n = 48), and compared with a nonrandomised control group (n = 48). SUCCEAT includes the cognitive-interpersonal model, cognitive behavioural elements, and motivational interviewing. The goal is to provide support for carers to improve their own well-being and to support their children. Outcome measures include carers' distress, anxiety, depression, expressed emotions, needs, motivation to change, experiences of caregiving, and skills. Further outcome measures are the patients' eating disorder symptoms, emotional problems, behavioural problems, quality of life, motivation to change, and perceived expressed emotions. These are measured before and after the intervention, and 1-year follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175075PMC
September 2018

Mental health problems in Austrian adolescents: a nationwide, two-stage epidemiological study applying DSM-5 criteria.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2017 Dec 24;26(12):1483-1499. Epub 2017 May 24.

Department for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria.

This is a nationwide epidemiological study using DSM-5 criteria to assess the prevalence of mental disorders in a large sample of Austrian adolescents between 10 and 18 years including hard-to-reach samples. A sample of 3615 adolescents from four cohorts (school grades 5, 7, 9, 11; age range 10-18 years) was recruited from 261 schools, samples of unemployed adolescents (n = 39) and adolescents from mental health institutions (n = 137) were added. The Youth Self-Report and SCOFF were used to screen for mental health problems. In a second phase, the Childrens' Diagnostic Interview for Mental Disorders was used to make point and lifetime psychiatric diagnoses. Mental health service use was also assessed. Point prevalence and lifetime prevalence rates for at least one psychiatric disorder were 23.9% and 35.8%. The highest lifetime prevalence rates were found for anxiety disorders (15.6%), neurodevelopmental disorders (9.3%; ADHD 5.2%) and depressive disorders (6.2%). Forty-seven percent of adolescents with a lifetime psychiatric disorder had a second diagnosis. Internalising disorders were more prevalent in girls, while neurodevelopmental disorders and disruptive, impulse control and conduct disorders were more prevalent in boys. Of those with a lifetime psychiatric disorder, 47.5% had contacted mental health services. Of the residual 52.5% who had not contacted mental health services, 18.1% expressed an interest in treatment. DSM-5 mental health disorders are highly prevalent among Austrian adolescents. Over 50% had or were interested in accessing treatment. Early access to effective interventions for these problems is needed to reduce burden due to mental health disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-017-0999-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5701961PMC
December 2017

A systematic review and secondary data analysis of the interactions between the serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and environmental and psychological factors in eating disorders.

J Psychiatr Res 2017 01 24;84:62-72. Epub 2016 Sep 24.

Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010, Australia.

Objectives: To summarize and synthesize the growing gene x environment (GxE) research investigating the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) in the eating disorders (ED) field, and overcome the common limitation of low sample size, by undertaking a systematic review followed by a secondary data meta-analysis of studies identified by the review.

Method: A systematic review of articles using PsycINFO, PubMed, and EMBASE was undertaken to identify studies investigating the interaction between 5-HTTLPR and an environmental or psychological factor, with an ED-related outcome variable. Seven studies were identified by the systematic review, with complete data sets of five community (n = 1750, 64.5% female) and two clinical (n = 426, 100% female) samples combined to perform four secondary-data analyses: 5-HTTLPR x Traumatic Life Events to predict ED status (n = 909), 5-HTTLPR x Sexual and Physical Abuse to predict bulimic symptoms (n = 1097), 5-HTTLPR x Depression to predict bulimic symptoms (n = 1256), and 5-HTTLPR x Impulsiveness to predict disordered eating (n = 1149).

Results: Under a multiplicative model, the low function (s) allele of 5-HTTLPR interacted with traumatic life events and experiencing both sexual and physical abuse (but not only one) to predict increased likelihood of an ED and bulimic symptoms, respectively. However, under an additive model there was also an interaction between sexual and physical abuse considered independently and 5-HTTLPR, and no interaction with traumatic life events. No other GxE interactions were significant.

Conclusion: Early promising results should be followed-up with continued cross-institutional collaboration in order to achieve the large sample sizes necessary for genetic research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2016.09.023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5125869PMC
January 2017

Coeliac disease in adolescence: Coping strategies and personality factors affecting compliance with gluten-free diet.

Appetite 2016 Jun 26;101:55-61. Epub 2016 Feb 26.

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, General Hospital of Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address:

Objectives: Patients suffering from a chronic condition such as coeliac disease (CD) need to develop coping strategies in order to preserve emotional balance and psychosocial functioning while adhering to their obligatory life-long gluten free diet (GFD). However, this can be particularly challenging for adolescents and may lead to dietary transgressions. Little is currently known about the influence of coping strategies and personality factors on dietary compliance. This study aims to explore these factors for the first time in adolescents with biopsy-proven CD.

Study Design: We included 281 adolescents with CD and 95 healthy controls. We classified patients according to their GFD adherence status (adherent vs. non-adherent) and assessed coping strategies using the KIDCOPE and personality traits using the Junior-Temperament and Character Inventory (J-TCI).

Results: Adolescents with CD adherent to GFD used less emotional regulation and distraction as coping strategies than non-adherent patients. In terms of personality traits, adherent patients differed from non-adherent patients with respect to temperament, but not with respect to character, showing lower scores in novelty seeking, impulsivity and rule transgressions and higher scores in eagerness with work and perfectionism compared to non-adherent patients. No differences were found between healthy controls and adherent CD patients across these personality traits.

Conclusions: Coping strategies and personality traits differ in adolescent patients with CD adherent to GFD from those not adherent, and may therefore relate to risk or protective factors in adherence. Targeting coping and temperament using psychological interventions may therefore be beneficial to support adolescents with CD and optimise their adherence to GFD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2016.02.155DOI Listing
June 2016

Associations between eating disorder diagnoses, behaviors, and menstrual dysfunction in a clinical sample.

Arch Womens Ment Health 2016 06 23;19(3):553-7. Epub 2015 Sep 23.

Institute of Child Health, Behavioral and Brain Sciences Unit, University College London, 30 Guilford Street, WC1N 1EH, London, UK.

We explored associations between lifetime eating disorder (ED) diagnoses and behaviors and menstrual dysfunction using logistic regression models. Body mass index (BMI) fully explained differences in the odds of secondary amenorrhea (SA) across diagnoses. Women with dieting behaviors had borderline significantly higher odds of SA than those without after accounting for BMI. We suggest the presence of a strong association between BMI and SA and that dieting might represent a risk factor for SA regardless of BMI and ED diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00737-015-0576-2DOI Listing
June 2016

A new social-family model for eating disorders: A European multicentre project using a case-control design.

Appetite 2015 Dec 18;95:544-53. Epub 2015 Aug 18.

Institute of Child Health, University College London (UCL), UK.

Objective: To examine a new socio-family risk model of Eating Disorders (EDs) using path-analyses.

Method: The sample comprised 1264 (ED patients = 653; Healthy Controls = 611) participants, recruited into a multicentre European project. Socio-family factors assessed included: perceived maternal and parental parenting styles, family, peer and media influences, and body dissatisfaction. Two types of path-analyses were run to assess the socio-family model: 1.) a multinomial logistic path-model including ED sub-types [Anorexia Nervosa-Restrictive (AN-R), AN-Binge-Purging (AN-BP), Bulimia Nervosa (BN) and EDNOS)] as the key polychotomous categorical outcome and 2.) a path-model assessing whether the socio-family model differed across ED sub-types and healthy controls using body dissatisfaction as the outcome variable.

Results: The first path-analyses suggested that family and media (but not peers) were directly and indirectly associated (through body dissatisfaction) with all ED sub-types. There was a weak effect of perceived parenting directly on ED sub-types and indirectly through family influences and body dissatisfaction. For the second path-analyses, the socio-family model varied substantially across ED sub-types. Family and media influences were related to body dissatisfaction in the EDNOS and control sample, whereas perceived abusive parenting was related to AN-BP and BN.

Discussion: This is the first study providing support for this new socio-family model, which differed across ED sub-types. This suggests that prevention and early intervention might need to be tailored to diagnosis-specific ED profiles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2015.08.014DOI Listing
December 2015

Eating Disorders in Adolescents with Celiac Disease: Influence of Personality Characteristics and Coping.

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2015 Sep 23;23(5):361-70. Epub 2015 Jun 23.

Eating Disorders Unit, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.

Objectives: Patients suffering from celiac disease (CD) have a higher risk of developing disturbed eating behaviour.

Method: In a multi-centre study, 259 female adolescents with CD and without a chronic condition were analysed regarding their eating disorder (ED) status, depression, personality, coping strategies and quality of life.

Results: Patients with CD and comorbid EDs were older and more often non-compliant with their diet and had a higher body mass index (BMI) and higher levels of depression. Differences in personality features disappear when controlling for age and depression. Higher ill-being and lower joy in life were reported by patients with CD and ED compared with patients without EDs, even when controlling for age and depression levels. No differences between patients (with CD) with and without EDs in coping strategies were found. BMI and lower self-directedness predicted ED status.

Conclusions: Early identification of EDs in patients with CD is suggested and should include BMI and personality factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2376DOI Listing
September 2015

Prevalence of Eating Disorder Risk and Associations with Health-related Quality of Life: Results from a Large School-based Population Screening.

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2016 Jan 26;24(1):9-18. Epub 2015 May 26.

Department for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of eating disorder (ED) risk as well as associated psychopathology and health-related quality of life (HrQoL) in a large population sample of Austrian adolescents.

Method: A sample of 3610 adolescents aged 10-18 years was recruited from 261 schools representative for the Austrian population. The SCOFF questionnaire was used to identify participants at risk for EDs, and the Youth Self-Report and KIDSCREEN were used to assess general psychopathology and HrQoL.

Results: In total, 30.9% of girls and 14.6% of boys were screened at risk for EDs. SCOFF scores were significantly associated with internalising and externalising behavioural problems as well as HrQoL after controlling for sex, age and body mass index. The SCOFF score further turned out to be an independent predictor of HrQoL.

Discussion: The high prevalence of ED risk among Austrian adolescents points out the need for prevention in this field. Variables indicating eating pathology should be included in general mental health screenings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2368DOI Listing
January 2016

The global burden of headache in children and adolescents - developing a questionnaire and methodology for a global study.

J Headache Pain 2014 Dec 11;15:86. Epub 2014 Dec 11.

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

Background: Burden of headache has been assessed in adults in countries worldwide, and is high, but data for children and adolescents are sparse. The objectives of this study were o develop a questionnaire and methodology for the global estimation of burden of headache in children and adolescents, to test these in use and to present preliminary data.

Methods: We designed structured questionnaires for mediated-group self-administration in schools by children aged 6-11 years and adolescents aged 12-17 years. In two pilot studies, we offered the questionnaires to pupils in Vienna and Istanbul. We performed face-to-face interviews in a randomly selected subsample of 199 pupils to validate the headache diagnostic questions.

Results: Data were collected from 1,202 pupils (mean 13.9 ± 2.4 years; 621 female, 581 male). The participation rate was 81.1% in Istanbul, 67.2% in Vienna. The questionnaire proved acceptable: ≤5% of participants disagreed partially or totally with its length, comprehensibility or simplicity. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values ranged between 0.71 and 0.76 for migraine and between 0.61 and 0.85 for tension-type headache (TTH). Cronbach's alpha was 0.83. The 1-year prevalence of headache was 89.3%, of migraine 39.3% and of TTH 37.9%. The prevalence of headache on ≥15 days/month was 4.5%. One fifth (20.7%) of pupils with headache lost ≥1 day of school during the preceding 4 weeks and nearly half (48.8%) reported ≥1 day when they could not do activities they had wanted to. The vast majority of pupils with headache experienced difficulties in coping with headache and in concentrating during headache. Quality of life was poorer in pupils with headache than in those without.

Conclusion: These pilot studies demonstrate the usefulness of the questionnaires and feasibility of the methodology for assessing the global burden of headache in children and adolescents, and predict substantial impact of headache in these age groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1129-2377-15-86DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4273720PMC
December 2014
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