Publications by authors named "Gudny Eiriksdottir"

235 Publications

The trans-ancestral genomic architecture of glycemic traits.

Nat Genet 2021 06 31;53(6):840-860. Epub 2021 May 31.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Glycemic traits are used to diagnose and monitor type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic health. To date, most genetic studies of glycemic traits have focused on individuals of European ancestry. Here we aggregated genome-wide association studies comprising up to 281,416 individuals without diabetes (30% non-European ancestry) for whom fasting glucose, 2-h glucose after an oral glucose challenge, glycated hemoglobin and fasting insulin data were available. Trans-ancestry and single-ancestry meta-analyses identified 242 loci (99 novel; P < 5 × 10), 80% of which had no significant evidence of between-ancestry heterogeneity. Analyses restricted to individuals of European ancestry with equivalent sample size would have led to 24 fewer new loci. Compared with single-ancestry analyses, equivalent-sized trans-ancestry fine-mapping reduced the number of estimated variants in 99% credible sets by a median of 37.5%. Genomic-feature, gene-expression and gene-set analyses revealed distinct biological signatures for each trait, highlighting different underlying biological pathways. Our results increase our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology by using trans-ancestry studies for improved power and resolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-021-00852-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7610958PMC
June 2021

Blood n-3 fatty acid levels and total and cause-specific mortality from 17 prospective studies.

Nat Commun 2021 04 22;12(1):2329. Epub 2021 Apr 22.

MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK.

The health effects of omega-3 fatty acids have been controversial. Here we report the results of a de novo pooled analysis conducted with data from 17 prospective cohort studies examining the associations between blood omega-3 fatty acid levels and risk for all-cause mortality. Over a median of 16 years of follow-up, 15,720 deaths occurred among 42,466 individuals. We found that, after multivariable adjustment for relevant risk factors, risk for death from all causes was significantly lower (by 15-18%, at least p < 0.003) in the highest vs the lowest quintile for circulating long chain (20-22 carbon) omega-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acids). Similar relationships were seen for death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and other causes. No associations were seen with the 18-carbon omega-3, alpha-linolenic acid. These findings suggest that higher circulating levels of marine n-3 PUFA are associated with a lower risk of premature death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22370-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8062567PMC
April 2021

Multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-sleep interactions identify novel loci for blood pressure.

Mol Psychiatry 2021 Apr 15. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Long and short sleep duration are associated with elevated blood pressure (BP), possibly through effects on molecular pathways that influence neuroendocrine and vascular systems. To gain new insights into the genetic basis of sleep-related BP variation, we performed genome-wide gene by short or long sleep duration interaction analyses on four BP traits (systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure) across five ancestry groups in two stages using 2 degree of freedom (df) joint test followed by 1df test of interaction effects. Primary multi-ancestry analysis in 62,969 individuals in stage 1 identified three novel gene by sleep interactions that were replicated in an additional 59,296 individuals in stage 2 (stage 1 + 2 P < 5 × 10), including rs7955964 (FIGNL2/ANKRD33) that increases BP among long sleepers, and rs73493041 (SNORA26/C9orf170) and rs10406644 (KCTD15/LSM14A) that increase BP among short sleepers (P < 5 × 10). Secondary ancestry-specific analysis identified another novel gene by long sleep interaction at rs111887471 (TRPC3/KIAA1109) in individuals of African ancestry (P = 2 × 10). Combined stage 1 and 2 analyses additionally identified significant gene by long sleep interactions at 10 loci including MKLN1 and RGL3/ELAVL3 previously associated with BP, and significant gene by short sleep interactions at 10 loci including C2orf43 previously associated with BP (P < 10). 2df test also identified novel loci for BP after modeling sleep that has known functions in sleep-wake regulation, nervous and cardiometabolic systems. This study indicates that sleep and primary mechanisms regulating BP may interact to elevate BP level, suggesting novel insights into sleep-related BP regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01087-0DOI Listing
April 2021

Sex-specific 25-hydroxyvitamin D threshold concentrations for functional outcomes in older adults: PRoject on Optimal VItamin D in Older adults (PROVIDO).

Am J Clin Nutr 2021 Jul;114(1):16-28

California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Background: Threshold serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations for extraskeletal outcomes are uncertain and could differ from recommendations (20-30 ng/mL) for skeletal health.

Objectives: We aimed to identify and validate sex-specific threshold 25(OH)D concentrations for older adults' physical function.

Methods: Using 5 large prospective, population-based studies-Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik (n = 4858, Iceland); Health, Aging, and Body Composition (n = 2494, United States); Invecchiare in Chianti (n = 873, Italy); Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (n = 2301, United States); and Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (n = 5862, United States)-we assessed 16,388 community-dwelling adults (10,376 women, 6012 men) aged ≥65 y. We analyzed 25(OH)D concentrations with the primary outcome (incident slow gait: women <0.8 m/s; men <0.825 m/s) and secondary outcomes (gait speed, incident self-reported mobility, and stair climb impairment) at median 3.0-y follow-up. We identified sex-specific 25(OH)D thresholds that best discriminated incident slow gait using machine learning in training data (2/3 cohort-stratified random sample) and validated using the remaining (validation) data and secondary outcomes.

Results: Mean age in the cohorts ranged from 74.4 to 76.5 y in women and from 73.3 to 76.6 y in men. Overall, 1112/6123 women (18.2%) and 494/3937 men (12.5%) experienced incident slow gait, 1098/7011 women (15.7%) and 474/3962 men (12.0%) experienced incident mobility impairment, and 1044/6941 women (15.0%) and 432/3993 men (10.8%) experienced incident stair climb impairment. Slow gait was best discriminated by 25(OH)D <24.0 ng/mL compared with 25(OH)D ≥24.0 ng/mL in women (RR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.50) and 25(OH)D <21.0 ng/mL compared with 25(OH)D ≥21.0 ng/mL in men (RR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.01, 2.02). Most associations between 25(OH)D and secondary outcomes were modest; estimates were similar between validation and training datasets.

Conclusions: Empirically identified and validated sex-specific threshold 25(OH)D concentrations for physical function for older adults, 24.0 ng/mL for women and 21.0 ng/mL for men, may inform candidate reference concentrations or the design of vitamin D intervention trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8246604PMC
July 2021

Accelerated decline in quadriceps area and Timed Up and Go test performance are associated with hip fracture risk in older adults with impaired kidney function.

Exp Gerontol 2021 07 16;149:111314. Epub 2021 Mar 16.

National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Objective: This study aimed to examine whether an accelerated decline in quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA), attenuation (a surrogate of quality), and strength, as well as lower limb muscular function, are associated with hip fractures in older adults with impaired kidney function.

Design: Prospective population-based study.

Setting: Community-dwelling old population in Reykjavik, Iceland.

Subjects: A total of 875 older adults (mean baseline age 76 years) from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study with impaired kidney function.

Methods: Quadriceps CSA and density were determined using computed tomography (CT), knee extension strength was measured with an isometric dynamometer chair, and muscular function was assessed using the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. All muscle-related measurements were assessed twice over a mean follow-up of 5.2 years. Data on hip fracture incidence was obtained from medical records during a maximum of 8.4 years of follow-up time.

Results: Fully adjusted cox-proportional hazard regression models showed that a faster decline in quadriceps CSA and TUG test performance were significantly associated with increased hip fracture risk (HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.02-2.36, and HR = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.19-2.72, respectively). A faster decrease in quadriceps density and isometric knee extension strength were not associated with fracture risk.

Conclusions: Accelerated decline in CT-derived quadriceps CSA and muscular function, as measured by the TUG test's performance, are predictive of hip fracture risk in older adults with impaired kidney function. TUG test is a simple measure and easily included in routine medical examinations, compared to CT scans, which seems to be useful for identifying a subgroup of individuals with high risk of fracture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2021.111314DOI Listing
July 2021

Computed tomography-based skeletal muscle and adipose tissue attenuation: Variations by age, sex, and muscle.

Exp Gerontol 2021 07 10;149:111306. Epub 2021 Mar 10.

Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Science, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Objective: This study aimed to investigate how skeletal muscle attenuation and adipose tissue (AT) attenuation of the quadriceps, hamstrings, paraspinal muscle groups and the psoas muscle vary according to the targeted muscles, sex, and age.

Design: Population-based cross-sectional study.

Setting: Community-dwelling old population in Reykjavik, Iceland.

Subjects: A total of 5331 older adults (42.8% women), aged 66-96 years from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)- Reykjavik Study, who participated in the baseline visit (between 2002 and 2006) and had valid thigh and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans were studied.

Methods: Muscle attenuation and AT attenuation of the quadriceps, hamstrings, paraspinal muscle groups and the psoas muscle were determined using CT. Linear mixed model analysis of variance was performed for each sex, with skeletal muscle or AT attenuation as the dependent variable.

Results: Muscle attenuation decreased, and AT attenuation increased with age in both sexes, and these differences were specific for each muscle, although not in all age groups. Age-related differences in muscle and AT attenuation varied with specific muscle. In general, for both sexes, skeletal muscle attenuation of the hamstrings declined more than average with age. Men and women displayed a different pattern in the age differences in AT attenuation for each muscle.

Conclusions: Our data support the hypotheses that skeletal muscle attenuation decreases, and AT attenuation increases with aging. In addition, our data add new evidence, supporting that age-related differences in skeletal muscle and AT attenuation vary between muscles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2021.111306DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8096682PMC
July 2021

Serum FSH Is Associated With BMD, Bone Marrow Adiposity, and Body Composition in the AGES-Reykjavik Study of Older Adults.

J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2021 Mar;106(3):e1156-e1169

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Context: Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations increase during the perimenopausal transition and remain high after menopause. Loss of bone mineral density (BMD) and gain of bone marrow adiposity (BMA) and body fat mass also occur during this time. In mice, blocking the action of FSH increases bone mass and decreases fat mass.

Objective: To investigate the associations between endogenous FSH levels and BMD, BMA, and body composition in older adults, independent of estradiol and testosterone levels.

Design, Setting, And Participants: Older adults from the AGES-Reykjavik Study, an observational cohort study.

Main Outcome Measures: Areal BMD, total body fat, and lean mass were measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Lumbar vertebral BMA was measured by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Volumetric BMD and visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT, SAT) areas were measured with quantitative computed tomography. The least squares means procedure was used to determine sex hormone-adjusted associations between quartiles of serum FSH and BMD, BMA, and body composition.

Results: In women (N = 238, mean age 81 years), those in the highest FSH quartile, compared with the lowest quartile, had lower adjusted mean spine integral BMD (-8.6%), lower spine compressive strength index (-34.8%), higher BMA (+8.4%), lower weight (-8.4%), lower VAT (-17.6%), lower lean mass (-6.1%), and lower fat mass (-11.9%) (all P < 0.05). In men, FSH level was not associated with any outcome.

Conclusions: Older postmenopausal women with higher FSH levels have higher BMA, but lower BMD and lower fat and lean mass, independent of estradiol and testosterone levels. Longitudinal studies are needed to better understand the underlying mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/clinem/dgaa922DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7947831PMC
March 2021

Cerebral small vessel disease genomics and its implications across the lifespan.

Nat Commun 2020 12 8;11(1):6285. Epub 2020 Dec 8.

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, 35233, USA.

White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are the most common brain-imaging feature of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), hypertension being the main known risk factor. Here, we identify 27 genome-wide loci for WMH-volume in a cohort of 50,970 older individuals, accounting for modification/confounding by hypertension. Aggregated WMH risk variants were associated with altered white matter integrity (p = 2.5×10-7) in brain images from 1,738 young healthy adults, providing insight into the lifetime impact of SVD genetic risk. Mendelian randomization suggested causal association of increasing WMH-volume with stroke, Alzheimer-type dementia, and of increasing blood pressure (BP) with larger WMH-volume, notably also in persons without clinical hypertension. Transcriptome-wide colocalization analyses showed association of WMH-volume with expression of 39 genes, of which four encode known drug targets. Finally, we provide insight into BP-independent biological pathways underlying SVD and suggest potential for genetic stratification of high-risk individuals and for genetically-informed prioritization of drug targets for prevention trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19111-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7722866PMC
December 2020

A Noncoding Variant Near PPP1R3B Promotes Liver Glycogen Storage and MetS, but Protects Against Myocardial Infarction.

J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2021 Jan;106(2):372-387

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Havard University, Boston, MA, USA.

Context: Glycogen storage diseases are rare. Increased glycogen in the liver results in increased attenuation.

Objective: Investigate the association and function of a noncoding region associated with liver attenuation but not histologic nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

Design: Genetics of Obesity-associated Liver Disease Consortium.

Setting: Population-based.

Main Outcome: Computed tomography measured liver attenuation.

Results: Carriers of rs4841132-A (frequency 2%-19%) do not show increased hepatic steatosis; they have increased liver attenuation indicative of increased glycogen deposition. rs4841132 falls in a noncoding RNA LOC157273 ~190 kb upstream of PPP1R3B. We demonstrate that rs4841132-A increases PPP1R3B through a cis genetic effect. Using CRISPR/Cas9 we engineered a 105-bp deletion including rs4841132-A in human hepatocarcinoma cells that increases PPP1R3B, decreases LOC157273, and increases glycogen perfectly mirroring the human disease. Overexpression of PPP1R3B or knockdown of LOC157273 increased glycogen but did not result in decreased LOC157273 or increased PPP1R3B, respectively, suggesting that the effects may not all occur via affecting RNA levels. Based on electronic health record (EHR) data, rs4841132-A associates with all components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, rs4841132-A associated with decreased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and risk for myocardial infarction (MI). A metabolic signature for rs4841132-A includes increased glycine, lactate, triglycerides, and decreased acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate.

Conclusions: These results show that rs4841132-A promotes a hepatic glycogen storage disease by increasing PPP1R3B and decreasing LOC157273. rs4841132-A promotes glycogen accumulation and development of MetS but lowers LDL cholesterol and risk for MI. These results suggest that elevated hepatic glycogen is one cause of MetS that does not invariably promote MI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/clinem/dgaa855DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7823249PMC
January 2021

Discovery of rare variants associated with blood pressure regulation through meta-analysis of 1.3 million individuals.

Nat Genet 2020 12 23;52(12):1314-1332. Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.

Genetic studies of blood pressure (BP) to date have mainly analyzed common variants (minor allele frequency > 0.05). In a meta-analysis of up to ~1.3 million participants, we discovered 106 new BP-associated genomic regions and 87 rare (minor allele frequency ≤ 0.01) variant BP associations (P < 5 × 10), of which 32 were in new BP-associated loci and 55 were independent BP-associated single-nucleotide variants within known BP-associated regions. Average effects of rare variants (44% coding) were ~8 times larger than common variant effects and indicate potential candidate causal genes at new and known loci (for example, GATA5 and PLCB3). BP-associated variants (including rare and common) were enriched in regions of active chromatin in fetal tissues, potentially linking fetal development with BP regulation in later life. Multivariable Mendelian randomization suggested possible inverse effects of elevated systolic and diastolic BP on large artery stroke. Our study demonstrates the utility of rare-variant analyses for identifying candidate genes and the results highlight potential therapeutic targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-020-00713-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7610439PMC
December 2020

Gene-educational attainment interactions in a multi-ancestry genome-wide meta-analysis identify novel blood pressure loci.

Mol Psychiatry 2020 May 5. Epub 2020 May 5.

Health Disparities Research Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, 21224, USA.

Educational attainment is widely used as a surrogate for socioeconomic status (SES). Low SES is a risk factor for hypertension and high blood pressure (BP). To identify novel BP loci, we performed multi-ancestry meta-analyses accounting for gene-educational attainment interactions using two variables, "Some College" (yes/no) and "Graduated College" (yes/no). Interactions were evaluated using both a 1 degree of freedom (DF) interaction term and a 2DF joint test of genetic and interaction effects. Analyses were performed for systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure. We pursued genome-wide interrogation in Stage 1 studies (N = 117 438) and follow-up on promising variants in Stage 2 studies (N = 293 787) in five ancestry groups. Through combined meta-analyses of Stages 1 and 2, we identified 84 known and 18 novel BP loci at genome-wide significance level (P < 5 × 10). Two novel loci were identified based on the 1DF test of interaction with educational attainment, while the remaining 16 loci were identified through the 2DF joint test of genetic and interaction effects. Ten novel loci were identified in individuals of African ancestry. Several novel loci show strong biological plausibility since they involve physiologic systems implicated in BP regulation. They include genes involved in the central nervous system-adrenal signaling axis (ZDHHC17, CADPS, PIK3C2G), vascular structure and function (GNB3, CDON), and renal function (HAS2 and HAS2-AS1, SLIT3). Collectively, these findings suggest a role of educational attainment or SES in further dissection of the genetic architecture of BP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-020-0719-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7641978PMC
May 2020

Childhood overweight and obesity and the risk of depression across the lifespan.

BMC Pediatr 2020 01 21;20(1):25. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali, The National University Hospital of Iceland and Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Eiriksgata 29, 101, Reykjavik, Iceland.

Background: Obesity has been longitudinally associated with depression but only few studies take a life course approach. This longitudinal study investigates whether being overweight or obese at age 8 and 13 years is associated with depressive symptoms more than 60 years later and whether this association is independent of late-life body mass index (BMI). We also investigated the association of being overweight/obese at age 8 or 13 years with ever having major depressive disorder (lifetime MDD).

Method: This analysis is based on a sub-sample of 889 AGES-Reykjavik participants with measured BMI data from early life. Late-life depressive symptoms were measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and lifetime MDD was assessed at late-life using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the relationships between BMI (continuous and categorical) at age 8 or 13 years, and late-life depressive symptoms (measured as GDS ≥ 5) or lifetime MDD, adjusted for sex, education, physical activity, smoking status and alcohol use. In a separate model, additional adjustments were made for late-life BMI.

Results: One hundred and one subjects (11%) had depressive symptoms at late-life (GDS ≥ 5), and 39 subjects (4.4%) had lifetime MDD. Being overweight or obese at age 8 or 13 years was not associated with higher depressive symptoms during late-life, irrespective of late-life BMI. Being overweight or obese at age 8 years, but not age 13 years was associated with an increased risk of lifetime MDD (Odds Ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for age 8 = 4.03[1.16-13.96]P = 0.03 and age 13 = 2.65[0.69-10.26] P = 0.16, respectively).

Conclusion: Being overweight in childhood was associated with increased odds of lifetime MDD, although the magnitude of the risk is uncertain given the small numbers of participants with lifetime MDD. No clear association was observed between childhood and adolescent overweight/obesity and late-life depressive symptoms irrespective of late life BMI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12887-020-1930-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6971945PMC
January 2020

Body size at birth and age-related macular degeneration in old age.

Acta Ophthalmol 2019 Dec 29. Epub 2019 Dec 29.

Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications, Intramural Research Program, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Purpose: To study associations between body size at birth and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in old age.

Methods: The study sample consists of 1497 community-dwelling individuals (56.1% women) aged 67-89 years with birth data and retinal data collected twice in old age 5 years apart. Birth data (weight, length, birth order) were extracted from original birth records. Digital retinal photographs were graded to determine AMD status. Data on covariates were collected at the baseline physical examination in old age. Multivariable regression analyses were used to study the association between birth data and AMD adjusting for known confounding factors, including birth year cohort effects.

Results: The prevalence and 5-year incidence of any AMD were 33.1% and 17.0%, respectively. Men and women born in 1930-1936 were significantly leaner and slightly longer at birth compared to those in earlier birth cohorts. There were no consistent associations between weight, length or ponderal index (PI) at birth and AMD in old age even when stratified by birth cohort. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) prevalence (39.8%) and 5-year incidence (28.6%) were highest in individuals who were in the highest quartile of PI at birth and who were obese in old age.

Conclusion: Body size at birth was not consistently associated with AMD in old age, suggesting that intrauterine growth might have little direct importance in the development of AMD in old age. It is possible that some yet unknown factors related to larger size at birth and obesity in old age may explain differences in the prevalence and incidence of AMD in the ageing population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aos.14340DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7321907PMC
December 2019

Multi-ancestry sleep-by-SNP interaction analysis in 126,926 individuals reveals lipid loci stratified by sleep duration.

Nat Commun 2019 11 12;10(1):5121. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.

Both short and long sleep are associated with an adverse lipid profile, likely through different biological pathways. To elucidate the biology of sleep-associated adverse lipid profile, we conduct multi-ancestry genome-wide sleep-SNP interaction analyses on three lipid traits (HDL-c, LDL-c and triglycerides). In the total study sample (discovery + replication) of 126,926 individuals from 5 different ancestry groups, when considering either long or short total sleep time interactions in joint analyses, we identify 49 previously unreported lipid loci, and 10 additional previously unreported lipid loci in a restricted sample of European-ancestry cohorts. In addition, we identify new gene-sleep interactions for known lipid loci such as LPL and PCSK9. The previously unreported lipid loci have a modest explained variance in lipid levels: most notable, gene-short-sleep interactions explain 4.25% of the variance in triglyceride level. Collectively, these findings contribute to our understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in sleep-associated adverse lipid profiles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-12958-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6851116PMC
November 2019

Genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies five novel loci for age-related hearing impairment.

Sci Rep 2019 10 23;9(1):15192. Epub 2019 Oct 23.

Department of Medicine, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.

Previous research has shown that genes play a substantial role in determining a person's susceptibility to age-related hearing impairment. The existing studies on this subject have different results, which may be caused by difficulties in determining the phenotype or the limited number of participants involved. Here, we have gathered the largest sample to date (discovery n = 9,675; replication n = 10,963; validation n = 356,141), and examined phenotypes that represented low/mid and high frequency hearing loss on the pure tone audiogram. We identified 7 loci that were either replicated and/or validated, of which 5 loci are novel in hearing. Especially the ILDR1 gene is a high profile candidate, as it contains our top SNP, is a known hearing loss gene, has been linked to age-related hearing impairment before, and in addition is preferentially expressed within hair cells of the inner ear. By verifying all previously published SNPs, we can present a paper that combines all new and existing findings to date, giving a complete overview of the genetic architecture of age-related hearing impairment. This is of importance as age-related hearing impairment is highly prevalent in our ageing society and represents a large socio-economic burden.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-51630-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6811684PMC
October 2019

Greater Bone Marrow Adiposity Predicts Bone Loss in Older Women.

J Bone Miner Res 2020 02 14;35(2):326-332. Epub 2019 Nov 14.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Bone marrow adiposity (BMA) is associated with aging and osteoporosis, but whether BMA can predict bone loss and fractures remains unknown. Using data from the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik study, we investigated the associations between H-MRS-based measures of vertebral bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT), annualized change in bone density/strength by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and DXA, and secondarily, with incident clinical fractures and radiographic vertebral fractures among older adults. The associations between BMAT and annualized change in bone density/strength were evaluated using linear regression models, adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, estradiol, and testosterone. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the associations between baseline BMAT and incident clinical fractures, and logistic regression models for incident vertebral fractures. At baseline, mean ± SD age was 80.9 ± 4.2 and 82.6 ± 4.2 years in women (n = 148) and men (n = 150), respectively. Mean baseline BMAT was 55.4% ± 8.1% in women and 54.1% ± 8.2% in men. Incident clinical fractures occurred in 7.4% of women over 2.8 years and in 6.0% of men over 2.2 years. Incident vertebral fractures occurred in 12% of women over 3.3 years and in 17% of men over 2.7 years. Each 1 SD increase in baseline BMAT was associated with a 3.9 mg /cm /year greater loss of spine compressive strength index (p value = .003), a 0.9 mg/cm /year greater loss of spine trabecular BMD (p value = .02), and a 1.2 mg/cm /year greater loss of femoral neck trabecular BMD (p value = .02) in women. Among men, there were no associations between BMAT and changes in bone density/strength. There were no associations between BMAT and incident fractures in women or men. In conclusion, we found greater BMAT is associated with greater loss of trabecular bone at the spine and femoral neck, and greater loss of spine compressive strength, in older women. © 2019 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.3895DOI Listing
February 2020

Hyperuricemia is associated with intermittent hand joint pain in a cross sectional study of elderly females: The AGES-Reykjavik Study.

PLoS One 2019 23;14(8):e0221474. Epub 2019 Aug 23.

University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.

Background: The debate whether "asymptomatic hyperuricemia" should be treated is still ongoing. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to analyze whether hyperuricema in the elderly is associated with joint pain.

Methods And Findings: Participants in the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study (males 2195, females 2975, mean age 76(6)) answered standardized questions about joint pain. In addition they recorded intermittent hand joint pain by marking a diagram of the hand. In males, no association was found between hyperuricemia and pain. Females however, showed a positive association between hyperuricemia and joint pain at many sites. After adjustment for age, BMI and hand osteoarthritis however, only intermittent hand joint pain (OR 1.30(1.07-1.58), p = 0.008) and intermittent pain in ≥10 hand joints (OR 1.75(1.32-2.31), p<0.001) remained significant. The best model for describing the relationship between serum uric acid levels (SUA) and intermittent hand joint pain in ≥10 joints was non-linear with a cut-off at 372 μmol/L. The attributable surplus number of symptomatic females with SUA ≥372 μmol/L was approximately 2.0% of the study population for those reporting pain in ≥10 hand joints. Next after having severe hand osteoarthritis, SUA ≥372 was an independent predictive factor of intermittent pain in ≥10 hand joints. Intermittent hand joint pain was also an independent risk factor for worse general health description.

Conclusion: Results from this population based study indicate that hyperuricemia in elderly females may be a rather frequent cause of intermittent hand joint pain, often in many joints. The most likely explanation relates to low-grade urate crystal induced inflammation. Our data do not allow for assessment of the severity of symptoms or whether they merit specific treatment, but intermittent hand joint pain was an independent predictor of worse general health. These findings may be an important contribution to the debate on whether hyperuricemia should be treated.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0221474PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6707588PMC
March 2020

Overlap of Genetic Risk between Interstitial Lung Abnormalities and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2019 12;200(11):1402-1413

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Interstitial lung abnormalities (ILAs) are associated with the highest genetic risk locus for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); however, the extent to which there are unique associations among individuals with ILAs or additional overlap with IPF is not known. To perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of ILAs. ILAs and a subpleural-predominant subtype were assessed on chest computed tomography (CT) scans in the AGES (Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility), COPDGene (Genetic Epidemiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease [COPD]), Framingham Heart, ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-points), MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis), and SPIROMICS (Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study) studies. We performed a GWAS of ILAs in each cohort and combined the results using a meta-analysis. We assessed for overlapping associations in independent GWASs of IPF. Genome-wide genotyping data were available for 1,699 individuals with ILAs and 10,274 control subjects. The (mucin 5B) promoter variant rs35705950 was significantly associated with both ILAs ( = 2.6 × 10) and subpleural ILAs ( = 1.6 × 10). We discovered novel genome-wide associations near (rs6886640,  = 3.8 × 10) and (rs73199442,  = 4.8 × 10) with ILAs, and near (rs7744971,  = 4.2 × 10) with subpleural-predominant ILAs. These novel associations were not associated with IPF. Among 12 previously reported IPF GWAS loci, five (, , , , and ) were significantly associated ( < 0.05/12) with ILAs. In a GWAS of ILAs in six studies, we confirmed the association with a promoter variant and found strong evidence for an effect of previously described IPF loci; however, novel ILA associations were not associated with IPF. These findings highlight common genetically driven biologic pathways between ILAs and IPF, and also suggest distinct ones.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201903-0511OCDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6884045PMC
December 2019

Effects of Calcium, Magnesium, and Potassium Concentrations on Ventricular Repolarization in Unselected Individuals.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2019 06;73(24):3118-3131

Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California.

Background: Subclinical changes on the electrocardiogram are risk factors for cardiovascular mortality. Recognition and knowledge of electrolyte associations in cardiac electrophysiology are based on only in vitro models and observations in patients with severe medical conditions.

Objectives: This study sought to investigate associations between serum electrolyte concentrations and changes in cardiac electrophysiology in the general population.

Methods: Summary results collected from 153,014 individuals (54.4% women; mean age 55.1 ± 12.1 years) from 33 studies (of 5 ancestries) were meta-analyzed. Linear regression analyses examining associations between electrolyte concentrations (mmol/l of calcium, potassium, sodium, and magnesium), and electrocardiographic intervals (RR, QT, QRS, JT, and PR intervals) were performed. The study adjusted for potential confounders and also stratified by ancestry, sex, and use of antihypertensive drugs.

Results: Lower calcium was associated with longer QT intervals (-11.5 ms; 99.75% confidence interval [CI]: -13.7 to -9.3) and JT duration, with sex-specific effects. In contrast, higher magnesium was associated with longer QT intervals (7.2 ms; 99.75% CI: 1.3 to 13.1) and JT. Lower potassium was associated with longer QT intervals (-2.8 ms; 99.75% CI: -3.5 to -2.0), JT, QRS, and PR durations, but all potassium associations were driven by use of antihypertensive drugs. No physiologically relevant associations were observed for sodium or RR intervals.

Conclusions: The study identified physiologically relevant associations between electrolytes and electrocardiographic intervals in a large-scale analysis combining cohorts from different settings. The results provide insights for further cardiac electrophysiology research and could potentially influence clinical practice, especially the association between calcium and QT duration, by which calcium levels at the bottom 2% of the population distribution led to clinically relevant QT prolongation by >5 ms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2019.03.519DOI Listing
June 2019

Association Between Unrecognized Myocardial Infarction and Cerebral Infarction on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

JAMA Neurol 2019 Aug;76(8):956-961

Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, Maryland.

Importance: It is uncertain whether unrecognized myocardial infarction (MI) is a risk factor for cerebral infarction.

Objective: To determine whether unrecognized MI detected by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is associated with cerebral infarction.

Design, Setting, And Participants: This is a cross-sectional study of ICELAND MI, a cohort substudy of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study conducted in Iceland. Enrollment occurred from January 2004 to January 2007 from a community-dwelling cohort of older Icelandic individuals. Participants aged 67 to 93 years who underwent both brain MRI and late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI were included. Data analysis was performed from September 2018 to March 2019.

Exposures: Unrecognized MI identified by cardiac MRI.

Main Outcomes And Measures: Unrecognized MI was defined as cardiac MRI evidence of MI without a history of clinically evident MI. Recognized MI was defined as cardiac MRI evidence of MI with a history of clinically evident MI. Cerebral infarctions on brain MRI were included regardless of associated symptoms. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between MI status (no MI, unrecognized MI, or recognized MI) and cerebral infarction after adjustment for demographic factors and vascular risk factors. In addition, we evaluated the association between unrecognized MI and embolic infarcts of undetermined source.

Results: Five enrolled participants had nondiagnostic brain MRI studies and were excluded. Among 925 participants, 480 (51.9%) were women; the mean (SD) age was 75.9 (5.3) years. There were 221 participants (23.9%) with cardiac MRI evidence of MI, of whom 68 had recognized MI and 153 unrecognized MI. There were 308 participants (33.3%) with brain MRI evidence of cerebral infarction; 93 (10.0%) had embolic infarcts of undetermined source. After adjustment for demographic factors and vascular risk factors, the likelihood (odds ratio) of having cerebral infarction was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.2-3.4; P = .01) for recognized MI and 1.5 (95% CI, 1.02-2.2; P = .04) for unrecognized MI. After adjustment for demographics and vascular risk factors, unrecognized MI was also associated with embolic infarcts of undetermined source (odds ratio, 2.0 [95% CI, 1.1-3.5]; P = .02).

Conclusions And Relevance: In a population-based sample, we found an association between unrecognized MI and cerebral infarction. These findings suggest that unrecognized MI may be a novel risk factor for cardiac embolism and cerebral infarction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2019.1226DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6537766PMC
August 2019

Cigarette Smoking Is Associated With Lower Quadriceps Cross-sectional Area and Attenuation in Older Adults.

Nicotine Tob Res 2020 05;22(6):935-941

Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD.

Introduction: In addition to well-established links with cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, cigarette smoking may affect skeletal muscle; however, associations with quadriceps atrophy, density, and function are unknown. This study explored the associations of current and former smoking with quadriceps muscle area and attenuation as well as muscle force (assessed as knee extension peak torque) and rate of torque development-a measure of muscle power in older adults.

Methods: Data from 4469 older adults, aged 66-95 years at baseline in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study with measurements of thigh computed tomography, isometric knee extension testing, self-reported smoking history, and potential covariates were analyzed.

Results: Sex differences were observed in these data; therefore, our final analyses are stratified by sex. In men, both former smokers and current smokers had lower muscle area (with β= -0.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.17 to -0.03 and β = -0.19, 95% CI = -0.33 to -0.05, respectively) and lower muscle attenuation (ie, higher fat infiltration, β = -0.08, 95% CI = -0.16 to -0.01 and β = -0.17, 95% CI = -0.34 to -0.01, respectively) when compared with never smokers. Smoking status was not associated with male peak torque or rate of torque development. In women, current smoking was associated with lower muscle attenuation (β = -0.24, 95% CI = -0.34 to -0.13) compared to never smoking. Among female smokers (current and former), muscle attenuation and peak torque were lower with increasing pack-years.

Conclusions: Results suggest that cigarette smoking is related to multiple muscle properties at older age and that these relationships may be different among men and women.

Implications: This article presents novel data, as it examined for the first time the relationship between smoking and computed tomography-derived quadriceps muscle size (cross-sectional area) and attenuation. This study suggests that current cigarette smoking is related to higher muscle fat infiltration, which may have significant health implications for the older population, because of its known association with poor physical function, falls, and hip fractures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntz081DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7249920PMC
May 2020

Biomarkers of Dietary Omega-6 Fatty Acids and Incident Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality.

Circulation 2019 05;139(21):2422-2436

Benjamin Leon for Geriatrics Research and Education, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami (P.H.M.C.).

Background: Global dietary recommendations for and cardiovascular effects of linoleic acid, the major dietary omega-6 fatty acid, and its major metabolite, arachidonic acid, remain controversial. To address this uncertainty and inform international recommendations, we evaluated how in vivo circulating and tissue levels of linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA) relate to incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) across multiple international studies.

Methods: We performed harmonized, de novo, individual-level analyses in a global consortium of 30 prospective observational studies from 13 countries. Multivariable-adjusted associations of circulating and adipose tissue LA and AA biomarkers with incident total CVD and subtypes (coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, cardiovascular mortality) were investigated according to a prespecified analytic plan. Levels of LA and AA, measured as the percentage of total fatty acids, were evaluated linearly according to their interquintile range (ie, the range between the midpoint of the first and fifth quintiles), and categorically by quintiles. Study-specific results were pooled using inverse-variance-weighted meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was explored by age, sex, race, diabetes mellitus, statin use, aspirin use, omega-3 levels, and fatty acid desaturase 1 genotype (when available).

Results: In 30 prospective studies with medians of follow-up ranging 2.5 to 31.9 years, 15 198 incident cardiovascular events occurred among 68 659 participants. Higher levels of LA were significantly associated with lower risks of total CVD, cardiovascular mortality, and ischemic stroke, with hazard ratios per interquintile range of 0.93 (95% CI, 0.88-0.99), 0.78 (0.70-0.85), and 0.88 (0.79-0.98), respectively, and nonsignificantly with lower coronary heart disease risk (0.94; 0.88-1.00). Relationships were similar for LA evaluated across quintiles. AA levels were not associated with higher risk of cardiovascular outcomes; in a comparison of extreme quintiles, higher levels were associated with lower risk of total CVD (0.92; 0.86-0.99). No consistent heterogeneity by population subgroups was identified in the observed relationships.

Conclusions: In pooled global analyses, higher in vivo circulating and tissue levels of LA and possibly AA were associated with lower risk of major cardiovascular events. These results support a favorable role for LA in CVD prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.038908DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6582360PMC
May 2019

Dynamic sitting: Measurement and associations with metabolic health.

J Sports Sci 2019 Aug 30;37(15):1746-1754. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

a Department of Social Medicine/CAPHRI Care and Public Health Research Institute , Maastricht University , Maastricht , The Netherlands.

Dynamic sitting, such as fidgeting and desk work, might be associated with health, but remains difficult to identify out of accelerometry data. We examined, in a laboratory study, whether dynamic sitting can be identified out of triaxial activity counts. Among 18 participants (56% men, 27.3 ± 6.5 years), up to 236 counts per minute were recorded in the anteroposterior and mediolateral axes during dynamic sitting using a hip-worn accelerometer. Subsequently, we examined in 621 participants (38% men, 80.0 ± 4.7 years) from the AGES-Reykjavik Study whether dynamic sitting was associated with cardio-metabolic health. Compared to participants who recorded the fewest dynamic sitting minutes (Q), those with more dynamic sitting minutes had a lower BMI (Q = -1.39 (95%CI = -2.33;-0.46); Q = -1.87 (-2.82;-0.92); Q = -3.38 (-4.32;-2.45)), a smaller waist circumference (Q = -2.95 (-5.44;-0.46); Q = -3.47 (-6.01;-0.93); Q = -8.21 (-10.72;-5.71)), and a lower odds for the metabolic syndrome (Q = 0.74 [0.45;1.20] Q = 0.58 [0.36;0.95]; Q = 0.36 [0.22;0.59]). Our findings suggest that dynamic sitting might be identified using accelerometry and that this behaviour was associated with health. This might be important given the large amounts of time people spend sitting. Future studies with a focus on validation, causation and physiological pathways are needed to further examine the possible relevance of dynamic sitting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2019.1592800DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6579695PMC
August 2019

Genetic meta-analysis of diagnosed Alzheimer's disease identifies new risk loci and implicates Aβ, tau, immunity and lipid processing.

Nat Genet 2019 03 28;51(3):414-430. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Research Center and Memory Clinic of Fundació ACE, Institut Català de Neurociències Aplicades-Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.

Risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), the most prevalent dementia, is partially driven by genetics. To identify LOAD risk loci, we performed a large genome-wide association meta-analysis of clinically diagnosed LOAD (94,437 individuals). We confirm 20 previous LOAD risk loci and identify five new genome-wide loci (IQCK, ACE, ADAM10, ADAMTS1, and WWOX), two of which (ADAM10, ACE) were identified in a recent genome-wide association (GWAS)-by-familial-proxy of Alzheimer's or dementia. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region confirms the neurological and immune-mediated disease haplotype HLA-DR15 as a risk factor for LOAD. Pathway analysis implicates immunity, lipid metabolism, tau binding proteins, and amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism, showing that genetic variants affecting APP and Aβ processing are associated not only with early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease but also with LOAD. Analyses of risk genes and pathways show enrichment for rare variants (P = 1.32 × 10), indicating that additional rare variants remain to be identified. We also identify important genetic correlations between LOAD and traits such as family history of dementia and education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0358-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6463297PMC
March 2019

Disentangling the genetics of lean mass.

Am J Clin Nutr 2019 02;109(2):276-287

Icelandic Heart Association Holtasmari, Kopavogur, Iceland.

Background: Lean body mass (LM) plays an important role in mobility and metabolic function. We previously identified five loci associated with LM adjusted for fat mass in kilograms. Such an adjustment may reduce the power to identify genetic signals having an association with both lean mass and fat mass.

Objectives: To determine the impact of different fat mass adjustments on genetic architecture of LM and identify additional LM loci.

Methods: We performed genome-wide association analyses for whole-body LM (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) or bioelectrical impedance analysis, adjusted for sex, age, age2, and height with or without fat mass adjustments (Model 1 no fat adjustment; Model 2 adjustment for fat mass as a percentage of body mass; Model 3 adjustment for fat mass in kilograms).

Results: Seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in separate loci, including one novel LM locus (TNRC6B), were successfully replicated in an additional 47,227 individuals from 29 cohorts. Based on the strengths of the associations in Model 1 vs Model 3, we divided the LM loci into those with an effect on both lean mass and fat mass in the same direction and refer to those as "sumo wrestler" loci (FTO and MC4R). In contrast, loci with an impact specifically on LM were termed "body builder" loci (VCAN and ADAMTSL3). Using existing available genome-wide association study databases, LM increasing alleles of SNPs in sumo wrestler loci were associated with an adverse metabolic profile, whereas LM increasing alleles of SNPs in "body builder" loci were associated with metabolic protection.

Conclusions: In conclusion, we identified one novel LM locus (TNRC6B). Our results suggest that a genetically determined increase in lean mass might exert either harmful or protective effects on metabolic traits, depending on its relation to fat mass.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqy272DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6500901PMC
February 2019

Imaging Patterns Are Associated with Interstitial Lung Abnormality Progression and Mortality.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2019 07;200(2):175-183

1 Pulmonary and Critical Care Division.

Interstitial lung abnormalities (ILA) are radiologic abnormalities on chest computed tomography scans that have been associated with an early or mild form of pulmonary fibrosis. Although ILA have been associated with radiologic progression, it is not known if specific imaging patterns are associated with progression or risk of mortality. To determine the role of imaging patterns on the risk of death and ILA progression. ILA (and imaging pattern) were assessed in 5,320 participants from the AGES-Reykjavik Study, and ILA progression was assessed in 3,167 participants. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with ILA progression, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess time to mortality. Over 5 years, 327 (10%) had ILA on at least one computed tomography, and 1,435 (45%) did not have ILA on either computed tomography. Of those with ILA, 238 (73%) had imaging progression, whereas 89 (27%) had stable to improved imaging; increasing age and copies of genotype were associated with imaging progression. The definite fibrosis pattern was associated with the highest risk of progression (odds ratio, 8.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.7-25;  = 0.0003). Specific imaging patterns were also associated with an increased risk of death. After adjustment, both a probable usual interstitial pneumonia and usual interstitial pneumonia pattern were associated with an increased risk of death when compared with those indeterminate for usual interstitial pneumonia (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.4; = 0.001; hazard ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 2.3-6.8; < 0.0001), respectively. In those with ILA, imaging patterns can be used to help predict who is at the greatest risk of progression and early death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201809-1652OCDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6635786PMC
July 2019

Hand and knee osteoarthritis are associated with reduced diameters in retinal vessels: the AGES-Reykjavik study.

Rheumatol Int 2019 04 22;39(4):669-677. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.

To investigate the association between osteoarthritis (OA) and microvascular pathology, we examined the relationship between retinal microvascular caliber and osteoarthritis of the hand and knee in an elderly population. The AGES-Reykjavik is a population-based, multidisciplinary longitudinal cohort study of aging. Retinal vessel caliber, hand osteoarthritis and total knee joint replacements due to OA were examined in 4757 individuals (mean age 76 ± 5 years; 57% female). Incident knee joint replacements during 5-year follow-up (n = 2961, mean age 75 ± 5 years; 58% female) were also assessed. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index, showed an association between narrow arteriolar caliber and hand OA, as well as knee replacement. After adjustment for other covariates, including statin therapy, this association was significant for both hand OA in men and women [OR 1.10(1.03-1.17), p < 0.01] (per unit standard deviation decrease in CRAE) and TKR prevalence [OR 1.15 (1.01-1.32), p = 0.04], especially for men [OR 1.22 (1.00-1.51) p = 0.04] and also for incident TKRs in men [OR 1.50 (1.07-2.10), p = 0.04]. Narrow venular caliber was associated with hand OA in women [OR 1.10 (1.01-1.21), p = 0.03]. Retinal arterial narrowing in hand and knee OA is present in males as well as females. Venular narrowing in hand OA in women was an unexpected finding and is in contrast with the venular widening usually observed in cardiovascular diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-019-04243-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6729124PMC
April 2019

Validation of a Metabolite Panel for a More Accurate Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate Using Quantitative LC-MS/MS.

Clin Chem 2019 03 15;65(3):406-418. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Division of Nephrology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA;

Background: Clinical practice guidelines recommend estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using validated equations based on serum creatinine (eGFRcr), cystatin C (eGFRcys), or both (eGFRcr-cys). However, when compared with the measured GFR (mGFR), only eGFRcr-cys meets recommended performance standards. Our goal was to develop a more accurate eGFR method using a panel of metabolites without creatinine, cystatin C, or demographic variables.

Methods: An ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for acetylthreonine, phenylacetylglutamine, pseudouridine, and tryptophan was developed, and a 20-day, multiinstrument analytical validation was conducted. The assay was tested in 2424 participants with mGFR data from 4 independent research studies. A new GFR equation (eGFRmet) was developed in a random subset (n = 1615) and evaluated in the remaining participants (n = 809). Performance was assessed as the frequency of large errors [estimates that differed from mGFR by at least 30% (1 - P); goal <10%].

Results: The assay had a mean imprecision (≤10% intraassay, ≤6.9% interassay), linearity over the quantitative range ( > 0.98), and analyte recovery (98.5%-113%). There was no carryover, no interferences observed, and analyte stability was established. In addition, 1 - P in the validation set for eGFRmet (10.0%) was more accurate than eGFRcr (13.1%) and eGFRcys (12.0%) but not eGFRcr-cys (8.7%). Combining metabolites, creatinine, cystatin C, and demographics led to the most accurate equation (7.0%). Neither equation had substantial variation among population subgroups.

Conclusions: The new eGFRmet equation could serve as a confirmatory test for GFR estimation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2018.288092DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6646882PMC
March 2019