Publications by authors named "Grigorios Chatziparasidis"

6 Publications

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Authors' Response: COVID-19 in Children with Asthma.

Lung 2021 08 11;199(4):437-438. Epub 2021 Aug 11.

Pediatric Asthma and Cough Centre, Instituti Ospedalieri Bergamaschi, University and Research Hospitals, Bergamo, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00408-021-00461-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8356544PMC
August 2021

Action and Reaction of Pre-Primary and Primary School-Age Children to Restrictions during COVID-19 Pandemic in Greece.

J Pers Med 2021 May 23;11(6). Epub 2021 May 23.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Biopolis, 41110 Larissa, Greece.

The fast-spreading coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic forced countries to apply restrictive measures to counteract it. School closure was quickly adopted by health authorities. We aimed to investigate the compliance of children aged 4 to 12 years with the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions and evaluate the impact of school closure on the children's educational, social, economic, and psychological outcomes. An online survey was distributed through a social networking platform to parents of pre-primary and primary school-age children. The study period was defined as from 27 November 2020 to 3 December 2020, two weeks after the school closure due to the general lockdown in Greece. This study showed that the school units were well-informed and complied with the protection measures against COVID-19. The pupils quickly adopted the protection measures, even those whose parents suggested masks were less effective. The quarantine-forced school closure highly impacted primary school children's physical activity, quality of sleep, psychological status, eating habits, academic performance, and household income. Web use showed an increase, with the children over-spending extracurricular time in web activities. Our study highlights the need for long term monitoring of these aforementioned indices, and the development of COVID-19 mitigation measures that carefully incorporate effectiveness and societal impact.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jpm11060451DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8224797PMC
May 2021

Calprotectin: An Ignored Biomarker of Neutrophilia in Pediatric Respiratory Diseases.

Children (Basel) 2021 May 21;8(6). Epub 2021 May 21.

Pediatric Asthma and Cough Centre, Instituti Ospedalieri Bergamaschi, University and Research Hospitals, 24046 Bergamo, Italy.

Calprotectin (CP) is a non-covalent heterodimer formed by the subunits S100A8 (A8) and S100A9 (A9). When neutrophils become activated, undergo disruption, or die, this abundant cytosolic neutrophil protein is released. By fervently chelating trace metal ions that are essential for bacterial development, CP plays an important role in human innate immunity. It also serves as an alarmin by controlling the inflammatory response after it is released. Extracellular concentrations of CP increase in response to infection and inflammation, and are used as a biomarker of neutrophil activation in a variety of inflammatory diseases. Although it has been almost 40 years since CP was discovered, its use in daily pediatric practice is still limited. Current evidence suggests that CP could be used as a biomarker in a variety of pediatric respiratory diseases, and could become a valuable key factor in promoting diagnostic and therapeutic capacity. The aim of this study is to re-introduce CP to the medical community and to emphasize its potential role with the hope of integrating it as a useful adjunct, in the practice of pediatric respiratory medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/children8060428DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8223968PMC
May 2021

Childhood chronic cough made easy: a simplified approach for the primary care setting.

Allergol Immunopathol (Madr) 2021 1;49(2):170-177. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Primary Cilia Dyskinesia Unit, School of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Athens, GreecePediatric Respiratory Unit, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras, GreecePediatric Asthma and Cough Centre, Instituti Ospedalieri Bergamaschi, University and Research Hospitals, Bergamo, Italy.

Cough is a defense mechanism, but when it becomes persistent and troublesome, it must be carefully assessed. Chronic cough, that is, cough persisting for more than 4 weeks, has a proven negative impact on a child's quality of life; it interferes with daily activities, sleep, and schooling and may involve frequent health care visits and long-lasting treatments. Currently, there is a plethora of algorithms in the literature aiming to assist in the assessment of chronic cough in children; however, referring to complex flowcharts may be impractical for the usually busy primary care physician. Herein, we provide a simplified tool for the assessment of children with chronic cough in the primary care setting, presenting a basic approach to the most common causes along with hints to avoid common pitfalls in everyday practice. Finally, the most common clinical scenarios are analyzed, aiming to assist primary care physicians in providing the appropriate care to these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15586/aei.v49i2.38DOI Listing
March 2021

COVID-19 in Children with Asthma.

Lung 2021 02 26;199(1):7-12. Epub 2021 Jan 26.

Pediatric Asthma and Cough Centre, Instituti Ospedalieri Bergamaschi, University and Research Hospitals, Bergamo, Italy.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects both children and adults but epidemiological and clinical data demonstrate that children are less likely to have a severe disease course or die. Furthermore, asthmatic children show less severe disease manifestations when infected with SARS-CoV-2 comparing to adults. This review focuses on SARS-CoV-2 and childhood asthma interaction and aims at summarizing the current knowledge of the potential mechanisms that ameliorate disease symptomatology in asthmatic children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00408-021-00419-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7835665PMC
February 2021

Lung Function Variability in Children and Adolescents With and Without Asthma (LUV Study): Protocol for a Prospective, Nonrandomized, Clinical Trial.

JMIR Res Protoc 2020 Aug 7;9(8):e20350. Epub 2020 Aug 7.

Pediatric Respiratory Unit, University Hospital of Patras, Patras, Greece.

Background: Variability analysis of peak expiratory flow (PEF) and forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV1) has been used in research to predict exacerbations in adults with asthma. However, there is a paucity of data regarding PEF and FEV1 variability in healthy children and adolescents and those with asthma.

Objective: The objective of this study is the assessment of PEF and FEV1 variability in (1) healthy children and adolescents, to define the normal daily fluctuation of PEF and FEV1 and the parameters that may influence it, and (2) children and adolescents with asthma, to explore the differences from healthy subjects and reveal any specific variability changes prior to exacerbation.

Methods: The study will include 100 healthy children and adolescents aged 6-18 years (assessment of normal PEF and FEV1 variability) and 100 children and adolescents of the same age with diagnosed asthma (assessment of PEF and FEV1 variability in subjects with asthma). PEF and FEV1 measurements will be performed using an ultraportable spirometer (Spirobank Smart; MIR Medical International Research) capable of smartphone connection. Measurements will be performed twice a day between 7 AM and 9 AM and between 7 PM and 9 PM and will be dispatched via email to a central database for a period of 3 months. PEF and FEV1 variability will be assessed by detrended fluctuation and sample entropy analysis, aiming to define the normal pattern (healthy controls) and to detect and quantify any deviations among individuals with asthma. The anticipated duration of the study is 24 months.

Results: The study is funded by the "C. Caratheodory" Programme of the University of Patras, Greece (PN 47014/24.9.2018). It was approved by the Ethics Committee (decision 218/19-03-2019) and the Scientific Board (decision 329/02-04-2019) of the University Hospital of Patras, Greece. Patient recruitment started in January 2020, and as of June 2020, 100 healthy children have been enrolled (74 of them have completed the measurements). The anticipated duration of the study is 24 months. The first part of the study (assessment of lung function variability in healthy children and adolescents) will be completed in August 2020, and the results will be available for publication by October 2020.

Conclusions: Healthy children and adolescents may present normal short- and long-term fluctuations in lung function; the pattern of this variability may be influenced by age, sex, and environmental conditions. Significant lung function variability may also be present in children and adolescents with asthma, but the patterns may differ from those observed in healthy children and adolescents. Such data would improve our understanding regarding the chronobiology of asthma and permit the development of integrated tools for assessing the level of control and risk of future exacerbations.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04163146; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04163146.

International Registered Report Identifier (irrid): DERR1-10.2196/20350.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/20350DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7442949PMC
August 2020
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