Publications by authors named "Gregory Mann"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Becoming a Training and Supervising Analyst: Interviews from the Columbia Postgraduate Analytic Practice Study.

Int J Psychoanal 2020 Apr;101(2):300-319

Columbia Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA.

Although much has been written about the training and supervising analyst system (TSA), its role in analysts' professional development has not been empirically studied. The Columbia Psychoanalytic Practice Study (CPAPS) is a longitudinal study of the careers of graduates from the Columbia Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. Interviews with 29/37 (78%) analysts graduating from 2003-2009 were analyzed using grounded theory. Our research question was: Are Columbia Center graduates interested in becoming TSAs and what factors influence their success in reaching this goal?Many analysts express interest in pursuing TSA appointment (22/29, 76%), however, a vast majority (26/29, 90%) experience challenges with finding cases, finances, and the work involved at a life stage with competing priorities. Fewer graduates become TSAs than express initial interest, suggesting that graduates find alternate pathways for professional development. While it is vital that institutes mentor graduates to take on a variety of postgraduate roles as educators, researchers, clinicians and scholars, our findings suggest that if the TSA qualification process were more user-friendly (less time-consuming, financially viable, and in step with current practice norms) more graduate analysts would sustain their interest in this career path.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207578.2019.1696656DOI Listing
April 2020

A single-cell RNA expression atlas of normal, preneoplastic and tumorigenic states in the human breast.

EMBO J 2021 Jun 5;40(11):e107333. Epub 2021 May 5.

ACRF Cancer Biology and Stem Cells Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Parkville, Vic, Australia.

To examine global changes in breast heterogeneity across different states, we determined the single-cell transcriptomes of > 340,000 cells encompassing normal breast, preneoplastic BRCA1 tissue, the major breast cancer subtypes, and pairs of tumors and involved lymph nodes. Elucidation of the normal breast microenvironment revealed striking changes in the stroma of post-menopausal women. Single-cell profiling of 34 treatment-naive primary tumors, including estrogen receptor (ER) , HER2 , and triple-negative breast cancers, revealed comparable diversity among cancer cells and a discrete subset of cycling cells. The transcriptomes of preneoplastic BRCA1 tissue versus tumors highlighted global changes in the immune microenvironment. Within the tumor immune landscape, proliferative CD8 T cells characterized triple-negative and HER2 cancers but not ER tumors, while all subtypes comprised cycling tumor-associated macrophages, thus invoking potentially different immunotherapy targets. Copy number analysis of paired ER tumors and lymph nodes indicated seeding by genetically distinct clones or mass migration of primary tumor cells into axillary lymph nodes. This large-scale integration of patient samples provides a high-resolution map of cell diversity in normal and cancerous human breast.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15252/embj.2020107333DOI Listing
June 2021

Professional and Personal Development After Psychoanalytic Training: Interviews with Early Career Analysts.

J Am Psychoanal Assoc 2020 Apr 4;68(2):217-239. Epub 2020 May 4.

Sabrina Cherry, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Columbia University, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons; Associate Director and Training and Supervising Analyst, Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. Juliette Meyer, Lecturer in Psychiatry, Columbia University, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons; Director of Admissions, Externship Program, and faculty, Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. Gregory Mann, M.A. Pamela Meersand, Associate Clinical Professor of Medical Psychology in Psychiatry, Columbia University, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons; Director of Child Division and Training and Supervising Analyst, Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research.

After analytic training, graduates position their newly acquired identity as "psychoanalyst" in the context of their broader career, contemplating whether to start new analytic cases, adapting their new knowledge base to psychotherapy practice, and deciding how to focus their professional and personal interests going forward. Using questionnaires and interviews, the Columbia Postgraduate Analytic Practice Study (CPAPS) has prospectively tracked the career trajectory of 69 of 76 graduates (91%) from the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research since 2003. In this paper grounded theory is used to identify developmental themes in interviews with analysts who have been followed for at least ten years. Recent graduates are negotiating the following challenges: developing a sense of competence, navigating relationships with colleagues and former supervisors as situations change and roles shift, transitioning into becoming mentors, and balancing the competing responsibilities of professional and personal life. Disillusionment about aspects of training, analytic practice, analysis as a treatment, institute politics, and the field in general emerges as a stark reality, despite a high level of career satisfaction. Educational recommendations include making career development opportunities available and providing a realistic view of both practice realities and expectations of analytic treatment outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003065120921563DOI Listing
April 2020

Outcomes of women at high familial risk for breast cancer: An 8-year single-center experience.

Asia Pac J Clin Oncol 2020 Apr 28;16(2):e27-e37. Epub 2019 Oct 28.

Breast Service, The Royal Melbourne and Royal Women's Hospitals, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

Objectives: The value of a high-risk surveillance program for mutation carriers and women at high familial breast cancer risk has not been extensively studied. A Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Management Clinic (BOCRMC) was established at the Royal Melbourne Hospital in 2010 to provide multimodality screening and risk management strategies for this group of women. The aims of this study were to evaluate the program and describe breast cancer diagnoses for BRCA1, BRCA2, and other germline mutation carriers as well as high-risk noncarriers attending the BOCRMC.

Methods: Clinical data from mutation carriers and noncarriers with a ≥25% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer who attended between 2010 and 2018 were extracted from clinic records and compared. The pattern and mode of detection of cancer were determined.

Results: A total of 206 mutation carriers and 305 noncarriers attended the BOCRMC and underwent screening on at least one occasion. Median age was 37 years. After a median follow-up of 34 months, 15 (seven invasive) breast cancers were identified in mutation carriers, with seven (six invasive) breast cancers identified in noncarriers. Of these, 20 (90.9%) were detected by annual screening, whereas two (9.1%) were detected as interval cancers (both in BRCA1 mutation carriers). Median size of the invasive breast cancers was 11 mm (range: 1.5-30 mm). The majority (76.9%) were axillary node negative. In women aged 25-49 years, the annualized cancer incidence was 1.6% in BRCA1, 1.4% in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 0.5% in noncarriers. This compares to 0.06% annualized cancer incidence in the general Australian population.

Conclusions: Screening was effective at detecting early-stage cancers. The incidence of events in young noncarriers was substantially higher than in the general population. This potentially justifies ongoing management through a specialty clinic, although further research to better personalize risk assessment in noncarriers is required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajco.13274DOI Listing
April 2020

The iPrevent Online Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Risk Management Tool: Usability and Acceptability Testing.

JMIR Form Res 2018 Nov 7;2(2):e24. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Department of Medical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria, Australia.

Background: iPrevent estimates breast cancer (BC) risk and provides tailored risk management information.

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the usability and acceptability of the iPrevent prototype.

Methods: Clinicians were eligible for participation in the study if they worked in primary care, breast surgery, or genetics clinics. Female patients aged 18-70 years with no personal cancer history were eligible. Clinicians were first familiarized with iPrevent using hypothetical paper-based cases and then actor scenarios; subsequently, they used iPrevent with their patients. Clinicians and patients completed the System Usability Scale (SUS) and an Acceptability questionnaire 2 weeks after using iPrevent; patients also completed measures of BC worry, anxiety, risk perception, and knowledge pre- and 2 weeks post-iPrevent. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics.

Results: The SUS and Acceptability questionnaires were completed by 19 of 20 clinicians and 37 of 43 patients. Usability was above average (SUS score >68) for 68% (13/19) clinicians and 76% (28/37) patients. The amount of information provided by iPrevent was reported as "about right" by 89% (17/19) clinicians and 89% (33/37) patients and 95% (18/19) and 97% (36/37), respectively, would recommend iPrevent to others, although 53% (10/19) clinicians and 27% (10/37) patients found it too long. Exploratory analyses suggested that iPrevent could improve risk perception, decrease frequency of BC worry, and enhance BC prevention knowledge without changing state anxiety.

Conclusions: The iPrevent prototype demonstrated good usability and acceptability. Because concerns about length could be an implementation barrier, data entry has been abbreviated in the publicly available version of iPrevent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/formative.9935DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6334700PMC
November 2018

Prospective validation of the NCI Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (Gail Model) on 40,000 Australian women.

Breast Cancer Res 2018 12 20;20(1):155. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, 3000, Australia.

Background: There is a growing interest in delivering more personalised, risk-based breast cancer screening protocols. This requires population-level validation of practical models that can stratify women into breast cancer risk groups. Few studies have evaluated the Gail model (NCI Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool) in a population screening setting; we validated this tool in a large, screened population.

Methods: We used data from 40,158 women aged 50-69 years (via the lifepool cohort) participating in Australia's BreastScreen programme. We investigated the association between Gail scores and future invasive breast cancer, comparing observed and expected outcomes by Gail score ranked groups. We also used machine learning to rank Gail model input variables by importance and then assessed the incremental benefit in risk prediction obtained by adding variables in order of diminishing importance.

Results: Over a median of 4.3 years, the Gail model predicted 612 invasive breast cancers compared with 564 observed cancers (expected/observed (E/O) = 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.18). There was good agreement across decile groups of Gail scores (χ = 7.1, p = 0.6) although there was some overestimation of cancer risk in the top decile of our study group (E/O = 1.65, 95% CI 1.33-2.07). Women in the highest quintile (Q5) of Gail scores had a 2.28-fold increased risk of breast cancer (95% CI 1.73-3.02, p < 0.0001) compared with the lowest quintile (Q1). Compared with the median quintile, women in Q5 had a 34% increased risk (95% CI 1.06-1.70, p = 0.014) and those in Q1 had a 41% reduced risk (95% CI 0.44-0.79, p < 0.0001). Similar patterns were observed separately for women aged 50-59 and 60-69 years. The model's overall discrimination was modest (area under the curve (AUC) 0.59, 95% CI 0.56-0.61). A reduced Gail model excluding information on ethnicity and hyperplasia was comparable to the full Gail model in terms of correctly stratifying women into risk groups.

Conclusions: This study confirms that the Gail model (or a reduced model excluding information on hyperplasia and ethnicity) can effectively stratify a screened population aged 50-69 years according to the risk of future invasive breast cancer. This information has the potential to enable more personalised, risk-based screening strategies that aim to improve the balance of the benefits and harms of screening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13058-018-1084-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6302513PMC
December 2018

Multiple marker abundance profiling: combining selected reaction monitoring and data-dependent acquisition for rapid estimation of organelle abundance in subcellular samples.

Plant J 2017 Dec 20;92(6):1202-1217. Epub 2017 Nov 20.

Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 1QR, UK.

Measuring changes in protein or organelle abundance in the cell is an essential, but challenging aspect of cell biology. Frequently-used methods for determining organelle abundance typically rely on detection of a very few marker proteins, so are unsatisfactory. In silico estimates of protein abundances from publicly available protein spectra can provide useful standard abundance values but contain only data from tissue proteomes, and are not coupled to organelle localization data. A new protein abundance score, the normalized protein abundance scale (NPAS), expands on the number of scored proteins and the scoring accuracy of lower-abundance proteins in Arabidopsis. NPAS was combined with subcellular protein localization data, facilitating quantitative estimations of organelle abundance during routine experimental procedures. A suite of targeted proteomics markers for subcellular compartment markers was developed, enabling independent verification of in silico estimates for relative organelle abundance. Estimation of relative organelle abundance was found to be reproducible and consistent over a range of tissues and growth conditions. In silico abundance estimations and localization data have been combined into an online tool, multiple marker abundance profiling, available in the SUBA4 toolbox (http://suba.live).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tpj.13743DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5863471PMC
December 2017

RANK ligand as a potential target for breast cancer prevention in BRCA1-mutation carriers.

Nat Med 2016 08 20;22(8):933-9. Epub 2016 Jun 20.

ACRF Stem Cells and Cancer Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research (WEHI), Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

Individuals who have mutations in the breast-cancer-susceptibility gene BRCA1 (hereafter referred to as BRCA1-mutation carriers) frequently undergo prophylactic mastectomy to minimize their risk of breast cancer. The identification of an effective prevention therapy therefore remains a 'holy grail' for the field. Precancerous BRCA1(mut/+) tissue harbors an aberrant population of luminal progenitor cells, and deregulated progesterone signaling has been implicated in BRCA1-associated oncogenesis. Coupled with the findings that tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11; also known as RANKL) is a key paracrine effector of progesterone signaling and that RANKL and its receptor TNFRSF11A (also known as RANK) contribute to mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated a role for this pathway in the pre-neoplastic phase of BRCA1-mutation carriers. We identified two subsets of luminal progenitors (RANK(+) and RANK(-)) in histologically normal tissue of BRCA1-mutation carriers and showed that RANK(+) cells are highly proliferative, have grossly aberrant DNA repair and bear a molecular signature similar to that of basal-like breast cancer. These data suggest that RANK(+) and not RANK(-) progenitors are a key target population in these women. Inhibition of RANKL signaling by treatment with denosumab in three-dimensional breast organoids derived from pre-neoplastic BRCA1(mut/+) tissue attenuated progesterone-induced proliferation. Notably, proliferation was markedly reduced in breast biopsies from BRCA1-mutation carriers who were treated with denosumab. Furthermore, inhibition of RANKL in a Brca1-deficient mouse model substantially curtailed mammary tumorigenesis. Taken together, these findings identify a targetable pathway in a putative cell-of-origin population in BRCA1-mutation carriers and implicate RANKL blockade as a promising strategy in the prevention of breast cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nm.4118DOI Listing
August 2016

First-principles Hubbard U approach for small molecule binding in metal-organic frameworks.

J Chem Phys 2016 May;144(17):174104

Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.

We apply first-principles approaches with Hubbard U corrections for calculation of small molecule binding energetics to open-shell transition metal atoms in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Using density functional theory with van der Waals dispersion-corrected functionals, we determine Hubbard U values ab initio through an established linear response procedure for M-MOF-74, for a number of different metal centers (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). While our ab initio U values differ from those used in previous work, we show that they result in lattice parameters and electronic contributions to CO2-MOF binding energies that lead to excellent agreement with experiments and previous results, yielding lattice parameters within 3%. In addition, U-dependent calculations for an example system, Co-MOF-74, suggest that the CO2 binding energy grows monotonically with the value of Hubbard U, with the binding energy shifting 4 kJ/mol (or 0.041 eV) over the range of U = 0-5.4 eV. These results provide insight into an approximate but computationally efficient means for calculation of small molecule binding energies to open-shell transition metal atoms in MOFs and suggest that the approach can be predictive with good accuracy, independent of the cations used and the availability of experimental data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4947240DOI Listing
May 2016

Management of Early Node-Positive Breast Cancer in Australia: A Multicentre Study.

Breast J 2016 Jul 20;22(4):413-9. Epub 2016 Apr 20.

The Breast Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital & The Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

To examine practice patterns for breast cancer patients with limited sentinel node (SN) disease in light of the ACOSOG Z0011 results. Retrospective analysis of patients with T1-2 breast cancer and positive sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) admitted between January 2009 and December 2012. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and treatments were recorded. Eight hundred positive SLNBs were identified. A total of 452 (56.5%) proceeded to completion axillary lymph node dissection (cALND). cALND rate decreased from 65.1% to 49.7% from 2009-2010 to 2011-2012. cALND was performed for micrometastasis or isolated tumor cells in 39.3% in 2009-2010 and 22.2% in 2011-2012, whereas for macrometastases the rates were 83.1% and 68.6%, respectively. cALND rates diminished for both Z0011-eligible and -ineligible patients. The ACOSOG Z0011 trial presentation and publication coincided with a reduction in cALND for breast cancer with limited nodal disease. There appears equipoise regarding management of macrometastatic SN disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbj.12595DOI Listing
July 2016

Sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer revisited.

Surgeon 2014 Jun 16;12(3):158-65. Epub 2014 Feb 16.

Department of Surgery, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Australia; The Breast Service, Royal Melbourne and Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address:

The axilla has long been a focus of clinicians' attention in the management of breast cancer. The approach to the axilla has undergone dramatic changes over the last century, from radical and extended radical excisions, through the introduction of sentinel node biopsy for node negative patients to the current situation where selective management of those with nodal involvement is being introduced. The introduction of lymphatic mapping and sentinel node biopsy in the 1990's has been key to the major changes that have occurred. In less than 20 years it has moved from a hypothesis to a situation where it is the default approach to almost all clinically node negative patients and is being considered in other situations where axillary clearance was previously considered standard. This article reviews the development and introduction of sentinel node biopsy, its current uncertainties and limitations, and possible future developments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surge.2013.12.007DOI Listing
June 2014

Comparison of outcomes after laparoscopic versus posterior retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomy: a pilot study.

Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech 2014 Feb;24(1):62-6

*Endocrine Surgery Unit, Royal Melbourne Hospital †Epworth Health Care ∥Melbourne EpiCentre, Royal Melbourne Hospital ‡Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne §Royal Women's Hospital, Vic., Australia.

Background: Posterior retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomy (PRA) was popularized by Walz and colleagues as an alternative approach to minimally invasive adrenalectomy, offering less postoperative pain and faster return to normal activity compared with laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy (LA). The authors have recently changed from LA to PRA in suitable patients and audited their outcomes.

Methods: Data were prospectively collected for 10 patients who underwent PRA, and a chart review and telephone interviews were conducted with 13 consecutive patients who underwent LA by the same surgeon. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, analgesia use, operative and anesthetic time, length of stay, and complications were recorded.

Results: Data were collected for 13 LAs and 10 PRAs. Patients' baseline characteristics, including age, BMI, and tumor size, were similar between the 2 groups. There were no conversions to open surgery, transfusions, or deaths. Operative time was similar between the 2 groups. PRA patients required less, inpatient postoperative opioid analgesia compared with LA patients (median 1.25 vs. 23 mg of intravenous morphine equivalent, P=0.003), and had a shorter length of stay (median 1 vs. 2 d, P<0.001). The median total days on opioids were lower for PRA patients compared with LA patients (0.5 vs. 9 d, P<0.001).

Conclusion: Our initial results supports previously published findings that PRA is a safe procedure, with a relatively short learning curve, resulting in reduced postoperative analgesia use, and reduced length of hospital stay when compared with the laparoscopic transperitoneal approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLE.0b013e31828fa71fDOI Listing
February 2014

MASCP gator: an overview of the Arabidopsis proteomic aggregation portal.

Front Plant Sci 2013 Oct 23;4:411. Epub 2013 Oct 23.

Joint BioEnergy Institute and Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA, USA.

A key challenge in the area of bioinformatics in the coming decades is the ability to manage the wealth of information that is being generated from the variety of high throughput methodologies currently being undertaken in laboratories across the world. While these approaches have made available large volumes of data to the research community, less attention has been given to the problem of how to intuitively present the data to enable greater biological insights. Recently, an attempt was made to tackle this problem in the area of Arabidopsis proteomics. The model plant has been the target of countless proteomics surveys producing an exhaustive array of data and online repositories. The MASCP Gator is an aggregation portal for proteomic data currently being produced by the community and unites a large collection of specialized resources to a single portal (http://gator.masc-proteomics.org/). Here we describe the latest additions, upgrades and features to this resource further expanding its role into protein modifications and genome sequence variations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2013.00411DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3806167PMC
October 2013

Preparation of silver nanoparticles by a non-aqueous sol-gel process.

J Nanosci Nanotechnol 2013 Aug;13(8):5445-51

Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ, UK.

Using a non-aqueous sol-gel process with a direct calcination step in air after prior drying, silver nanoparticles with average size distribution ranging from 20 to 100 nm were synthesised. Studies in reduced atmosphere were also performed with mixed results, both in phase and particle size, as the samples were found to be mixed with an amorphous phase. In oxidising atmosphere, the temperature and dwelling time were found to be critical factors with the former playing a larger role than the latter. Optimally nanoparticles of silver are best prepared by direct calcination in air of the precursor gel at 250 degrees C for 1 hour. Compared to silver particles prepared by microemulsions, the particle size is larger due to the thermal treatment, which causes a growth of the silver particles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1166/jnn.2013.7446DOI Listing
August 2013

Testing the results of municipal mixed-use zoning ordinances: a novel methodological approach.

J Health Polit Policy Law 2013 Aug 3;38(4):815-39. Epub 2013 May 3.

Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, USA.

Municipal mixed-use zoning (MUZ) is one public health strategy to create more walkable neighborhoods by reducing the separation of daily activities. This study uses a novel data-gathering methodology to evaluate municipal zoning ordinances in twenty-two California cities in conjunction with the walkability potential of resulting mixed-use zones, to explore the extent to which variations in uses mandated by MUZ ordinances are correlated with variations in walking opportunities. We find that, after controlling for population, socioeconomic status, and zone size, significant relationships exist between the range and precision of uses mandated by MUZ ordinances and the mixture and breadth of walking destinations in these zones. The study also demonstrates that analysis of municipal zoning codes and a novel data-gathering methodology yield valid data. The analysis of MUZ ordinances is a significant complement to other approaches to measuring walkability and can be used across cities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/03616878-2208612DOI Listing
August 2013

Proteome coverage of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana: implications for shotgun proteomic studies.

J Proteomics 2013 Feb 23;79:195-9. Epub 2012 Dec 23.

Joint BioEnergy Institute and Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

The recent aggregation of matched proteomics data for the model plant Arabidopsis has enabled the assessment of a diverse array of large scale shotgun proteomics data. A collection of over nine million matched peptides was used to assess proteome coverage and experimental parameters when compared to the theoretical tryptic peptide population. The analysis indicated that the experimentally identified median peptide mass was significantly higher than the theoretical median tryptic peptide in Arabidopsis. This finding led to a critical examination of precursor scan ranges currently being employed by shotgun proteomic studies. The analysis revealed diminishing returns at the high end scan range and opportunities for greater coverage and identifications at the low mass range. Based on these findings, a recommended basic scan range of 300 to 1200m/z would suitably capture the peptide population in shotgun proteomic analyses in Arabidopsis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2012.12.009DOI Listing
February 2013

Benign papilloma on core biopsy requires surgical excision.

Ann Surg Oncol 2008 Aug 13;15(8):2272-7. Epub 2008 May 13.

Department of Surgery, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan Street, Parkville 3050, Australia.

Background: When a papillary lesion is identified on core biopsy of an impalpable breast lesion, standard practice involves excisional biopsy. Recent literature has questioned the need for surgical excision in patients with benign core biopsy and radiological concordance. Our aim was to assess whether surgical excision is required by targeting this concordant group in a large screen-detected population.

Methods: A retrospective review of a prospectively collected database of all benign papillary core biopsies between February 1995 and September 2007 at North Western Breast Screen and Monash Breast Screen in Melbourne, Australia was performed. All patients had surgical excision, enabling correlation between core and final excisional biopsy results on all lesions. All histology reports were reviewed and the radiology was reassessed.

Results: During a 14-year period, 5783 core biopsies were performed from 633,163 screening mammograms. Eighty patients (0.01%) had benign papilloma on core biopsy, no patients had atypia on core biopsy, and all patients had benign radiological features. Of the 80 patients, 15 patients were found to have ductal carcinoma in situ (8) or invasive ductal carcinoma (7) on final pathology, yielding a 19% malignant rate.

Conclusion: Core biopsy showing benign papillary lesion, even where radiology is also suggestive of a benign process, cannot exclude malignancy, and therefore surgical excision is required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1245/s10434-008-9962-6DOI Listing
August 2008

An analysis of an implantable dosimeter system for external beam therapy.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2005 Sep;63(1):290-300

Sicel Technologies, Morrisville, NC 27560, USA.

Background And Purpose: To review the data from an implantable radiation dosimetry system used in a clinical setting and to examine correlations between dosimeter readings and potential causative error sources.

Materials And Methods: MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) based encapsulated dosimeters were evaluated in a phantom (in vitro) and in a study with 18 patients. The dosimeters were placed in the gross tumor volume or in collateral normal tissue. Predicted dose values were established by imaging the dosimeters in the planning CTs.

Results: The in vitro study confirmed that bounding cumulative errors due to setup, planning, and machine output within a +/-5% level is achievable. In patients, it was found that deviations from the targeted dose often exceeded the 5% level.

Conclusions: The use of an implantable dosimeter system could provide an effective empiric check on the dose delivered at depth. Such a tool may have value for institutional quality assurance, as well as for therapy delivered to individual patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.05.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2543134PMC
September 2005

An implantable radiation dosimeter for use in external beam radiation therapy.

Med Phys 2004 Sep;31(9):2658-71

Sicel Technologies, Morrisville, North Carolina 27560, USA.

An implantable radiation dosimeter for use with external beam therapy has been developed and tested both in vitro and in canines. The device uses a MOSFET dosimeter and is polled telemetrically every day during the course of therapy. The device is designed for permanent implantation and also acts as a radiographic fiducial marker. Ten dogs (companion animals) that presented with spontaneous, malignant tumors were enrolled in the study and received an implant in the tumor CTV. Three dogs received an additional implant in collateral normal tissue. Radiation therapy plans were created for the animals and they were treated with roughly 300 cGy daily fractions until completion of the prescribed cumulative dose. The primary endpoints of the study were to record any adverse events due to sensor placement and to monitor any movement away from the point of placement. No adverse events were recorded. Unacceptable device migration was experienced in two subjects and a retention mechanism was developed to prevent movement in the future. Daily dose readings were successfully acquired in all subjects. A rigorous in vitro calibration methodology has been developed to ensure that the implanted devices maintain an accuracy of +/-3.5% relative to an ionization chamber standard. The authors believe that an implantable radiation dosimeter is a practical and powerful tool that fosters individualized patient QA on a daily basis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1118/1.1778809DOI Listing
September 2004