Publications by authors named "Gregory A Poland"

388 Publications

Improving COVID-19 vaccine acceptance: Including insights from human decision-making under conditions of uncertainty and human-centered design.

Vaccine 2021 03 10;39(11):1547-1550. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

Mayo Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, 200 1st St. SW, Rochester MN, 55905, United States. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.02.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7875011PMC
March 2021

Vaccines, masks, distancing and credibility: An urgent warning for pandemic management.

Vaccine 2021 Feb 31;39(8):1173-1174. Epub 2021 Jan 31.

Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.01.052DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7847703PMC
February 2021

Prediction of post-vaccination Guillain-Barré syndrome using data from a passive surveillance system.

Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2021 Feb 2. Epub 2021 Feb 2.

Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Purpose: Severe adverse events (AEs), such as Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) occur rarely after influenza vaccination. We identify highly associated AEs with GBS and develop prediction models for GBS using the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) reports following trivalent influenza vaccination (FLU3).

Methods: This study analyzed 80 059 reports from the US VAERS between 1990 and 2017. Several AEs were identified as highly associated with GBS and were used to develop the prediction model. Some common and mild AEs that were suspected to be underreported when GBS occurred simultaneously were removed from the final model. The analyses were validated using European influenza vaccine AEs data from EudraVigilance.

Results: Of the 80 059 reports, 1185 (1.5%) were annotated as GBS related. Twenty-four AEs were identified as having strong association with GBS. The full prediction model, using age, sex, and all 24 AEs achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 85.4% (90% CI: [83.8%, 86.9%]). After excluding the nine (e.g., pruritus, rash, injection site pain) likely underreported AEs, the final AUC became 77.5% (90% CI: [75.5%, 79.6%]). Two hundred and one (0.25%) reports were predicted as of high risk of GBS (predicted probability >25%) and 84 actually developed GBS.

Conclusion: The prediction performance demonstrated the potential of developing risk-prediction models utilizing the VAERS cohort. Excluding the likely underreported AEs sacrificed some prediction power but made the model more interpretable and feasible. The high absolute risk of even a small number of AE combinations suggests the promise of GBS prediction within the VAERS dataset.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pds.5196DOI Listing
February 2021

The humoral immune response to high-dose influenza vaccine in persons with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

Vaccine 2021 Feb 16;39(7):1122-1130. Epub 2021 Jan 16.

Division of General Internal Medicine and Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Background: Limited data are available regarding the immunogenicity of high-dose influenza vaccine among persons with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis (MBL).

Methods: A prospective pilot study of humoral immune responses to 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 high-dose trivalent influenza vaccine (HD IIV; Fluzone® High-Dose; Sanofi Pasteur) was conducted among individuals with MBL and previously untreated CLL. Serum hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody titers were measured at baseline and Day 28 after vaccination; seroprotection and seroconversion rates were determined. Memory B cell responses were assessed by B-cell enzyme-linked immune absorbent spotassays.

Results: Thirty subjects (17 CLL and 13 MBL) were included. Median age was 69.5 years. Day 28 seroprotection rates for the cohort were 19/30 (63.3%) for A/H1N1; 21/23 (91.3%) for A/H3N2; and 13/30 (43.3%) for influenza B. Those with MBL achieved higher day 28 HAI geometric mean titers (54.1 [4.9, 600.1] vs. 12.1 [1.3, 110.1]; p = 0.01) and higher Day 28 seroprotection rates (76.9% vs. 17.6%; p = 0.002) against the influenza B-vaccine strain virus than those with CLL.

Conclusions: Immunogenicity of the HD IIV3 in patients with CLL and MBL is lower than reported in healthy adults. Immunogenicity to influenza B was greater in those with MBL than CLL.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.01.001DOI Listing
February 2021

Critical aspects of packaging, storage, preparation, and administration of mRNA and adenovirus-vectored COVID-19 vaccines for optimal efficacy.

Vaccine 2021 01 9;39(3):457-459. Epub 2020 Dec 9.

Mayo Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.12.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7723768PMC
January 2021

Durability of humoral immune responses to rubella following MMR vaccination.

Vaccine 2020 12 12;38(51):8185-8193. Epub 2020 Nov 12.

Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address:

Background: While administration of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR-II®) vaccine has been effective at preventing rubella infection in the United States, the durability of humoral immunity to the rubella component of MMR vaccine has not been widely studied among older adolescents and adults.

Methods: In this longitudinal study, we sought to assess the durability of rubella virus (RV)-specific humoral immunity in a healthy population (n = 98) of adolescents and young adults at two timepoints: ~7 and ~17 years after two doses of MMR-II® vaccination. Levels of circulating antibodies specific to RV were measured by ELISA and an immune-colorimetric neutralization assay. RV-specific memory B cell responses were also measured by ELISpot.

Results: Rubella-specific IgG antibody titers, neutralizing antibody titers, and memory B cell responses declined with increasing time since vaccination; however, these decreases were relatively moderate. Memory B cell responses exhibited a greater decline in men compared to women.

Conclusions: Collectively, rubella-specific humoral immunity declines following vaccination, although subjects' antibody titers remain well above the currently recognized threshold for protective immunity. Clinical correlates of protection based on neutralizing antibody titer and memory B cell ELISpot response should be defined.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.076DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7716653PMC
December 2020

Use of Deep Learning to Analyze Social Media Discussions About the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine.

JAMA Netw Open 2020 11 2;3(11):e2022025. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

School of Biomedical Informatics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Importance: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine hesitancy or refusal is common among parents of adolescents. An understanding of public perceptions from the perspective of behavior change theories can facilitate effective and targeted vaccine promotion strategies.

Objective: To develop and validate deep learning models for understanding public perceptions of HPV vaccines from the perspective of behavior change theories using data from social media.

Design, Setting, And Participants: This retrospective cohort study, conducted from April to August 2019, included longitudinal and geographic analyses of public perceptions regarding HPV vaccines, using sampled HPV vaccine-related Twitter discussions collected from January 2014 to October 2018.

Main Outcomes And Measures: The prevalence of social media discussions related to the construct of health belief model (HBM) and theory of planned behavior (TPB), categorized by deep learning algorithms. Locally estimated scatterplot smoothing (LOESS) revealed trends of constructs. Social media users' US state-level home location information was extracted from their profiles, and geographic analyses were performed to identify the clustering of public perceptions of the HPV vaccine.

Results: A total of 1 431 463 English-language posts from 486 116 unique usernames were collected. Deep learning algorithms achieved F-1 scores ranging from 0.6805 (95% CI, 0.6516-0.7094) to 0.9421 (95% CI, 0.9380-0.9462) in mapping discussions to the constructs of behavior change theories. LOESS revealed trends in constructs; for example, prevalence of perceived barriers, a construct of HBM, deceased from its apex in July 2015 (56.2%) to its lowest prevalence in October 2018 (28.4%; difference, 27.8%; P < .001); Positive attitudes toward the HPV vaccine, a construct of TPB, increased from early 2017 (30.7%) to 41.9% at the end of the study (difference, 11.2%; P < .001), while negative attitudes decreased from 42.3% to 31.3% (difference, 11.0%; P < .001) during the same period. Interstate variations in public perceptions of the HPV vaccine were also identified; for example, the states of Ohio and Maine showed a relatively high prevalence of perceived barriers (11 531 of 17 106 [67.4%] and 1157 of 1684 [68.7%]) and negative attitudes (9655 of 17 197 [56.1%] and 1080 of 1793 [60.2%]).

Conclusions And Relevance: This cohort study provided a good understanding of public perceptions on social media and evolving trends in terms of multiple dimensions. The interstate variations of public perceptions could be associated with the rise of local antivaccine sentiment. The methods described in this study represent an early contribution to using existing empirically and theoretically based frameworks that describe human decision-making in conjunction with more intelligent deep learning algorithms. Furthermore, these data demonstrate the ability to collect large-scale HPV vaccine perception and intention data that can inform public health communication and education programs designed to improve immunization rates at the community, state, or even national level.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.22025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7666426PMC
November 2020

The public's role in COVID-19 vaccination: Human-centered recommendations to enhance pandemic vaccine awareness, access, and acceptance in the United States.

Vaccine 2020 Oct 29. Epub 2020 Oct 29.

Department of The History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Center for Medical Humanities and Social Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Given the social and economic upheavals caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, political leaders, health officials, and members of the public are eager for solutions. One of the most promising, if they can be successfully developed, is vaccines. While the technological development of such countermeasures is currently underway, a key social gap remains. Past experience in routine and crisis contexts demonstrates that uptake of vaccines is more complicated than simply making the technology available. Vaccine uptake, and especially the widespread acceptance of vaccines, is a social endeavor that requires consideration of human factors. To provide a starting place for this critical component of a future COVID-19 vaccination campaign in the United States, the 23-person Working Group on Readying Populations for COVID-19 Vaccines was formed. One outcome of this group is a synthesis of the major challenges and opportunities associated with a future COVID-19 vaccination campaign and empirically-informed recommendations to advance public understanding of, access to, and acceptance of vaccines that protect against SARS-CoV-2. While not inclusive of all possible steps than could or should be done to facilitate COVID-19 vaccination, the working group believes that the recommendations provided are essential for a successful vaccination program.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.059DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7598529PMC
October 2020

Associations between markers of cellular and humoral immunity to rubella virus following a third dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine.

Vaccine 2020 11 4;38(50):7897-7904. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address:

Introduction: Rubella virus (RV) was eliminated in the United States in 2004, although a small portion of the population fails to develop long-term immunity against RV even after two doses of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. We hypothesized that inherent biological differences in cytokine and chemokine signaling likely govern an individual's response to a third dose of the vaccine.

Methods: Healthy young women (n = 97) were selected as study participants if they had either low or high extremes of RV-specific antibody titer after two previous doses of MMR vaccine. We measured cytokine and chemokine secretion from RV-stimulated PBMCs before and 28 days after they received a third dose of MMR vaccine and assessed correlations with humoral immune response outcomes.

Results: High and low antibody vaccine responders exhibited a strong pro-inflammatory cellular response, with an underlying Th1-associated signature (IL-2, IFN-γ, MIP-1β, IP-10) and suppressed production of most Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-13). IL-10 and IL-4 exhibited significant negative associations with neutralizing antibody titers and memory B cell ELISpot responses among low vaccine responders.

Conclusion: IL-4 and IL-10 signaling pathways may be potential targets for understanding and improving the immune response to rubella vaccination or for designing new vaccines that induce more durable immunity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7731962PMC
November 2020

Polymorphisms in STING Affect Human Innate Immune Responses to Poxviruses.

Front Immunol 2020 14;11:567348. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States.

We conducted a large genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the immune responses to primary smallpox vaccination in a combined cohort of 1,653 subjects. We did not observe any polymorphisms associated with standard vaccine response outcomes (e.g., neutralizing antibody, T cell ELISPOT response, or T cell cytokine production); however, we did identify a cluster of SNPs on chromosome 5 (5q31.2) that were significantly associated (p-value: 1.3 x 10 - 1.5x10) with IFNα response to poxvirus stimulation. Examination of these SNPs led to the functional testing of rs1131769, a non-synonymous SNP in causing an Arg-to-His change at position 232 in the STING protein-a major regulator of innate immune responses to viral infections. Our findings demonstrate differences in the ability of the two STING variants to phosphorylate the downstream intermediates TBK1 and IRF3 in response to multiple STING ligands. Further downstream in the STING pathway, we observed significantly reduced expression of type I IFNs (including IFNα) and IFN-response genes in cells carrying the H232 variant. Subsequent molecular modeling of both alleles predicted altered ligand binding characteristics between the two variants, providing a potential mechanism underlying differences in inter-individual responses to poxvirus infection. Our data indicate that possession of the H232 variant may impair STING-mediated innate immunity to poxviruses. These results clarify prior studies evaluating functional effects of genetic variants in and provide novel data regarding genetic control of poxvirus immunity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.567348DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7591719PMC
October 2020

Coronavirus disease 2019, multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, apolipoprotein E4, and race.

J Pediatr 2021 02 30;229:313-314. Epub 2020 Oct 30.

NCH Healthcare System Internal Medicine Residency, Affiliate of the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine and Science, Naples, FL.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.10.072DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7833555PMC
February 2021

A Decade in Review: A Systematic Review of Universal Influenza Vaccines in Clinical Trials during the 2010 Decade.

Viruses 2020 10 20;12(10). Epub 2020 Oct 20.

School of Biological Sciences, Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 4240 Fair Street, Lincoln, NE 68503, USA.

On average, there are 3-5 million severe cases of influenza virus infections globally each year. Seasonal influenza vaccines provide limited protection against divergent influenza strains. Therefore, the development of a universal influenza vaccine is a top priority for the NIH. Here, we report a comprehensive summary of all universal influenza vaccines that were tested in clinical trials during the 2010-2019 decade. Of the 1597 studies found, 69 eligible clinical trials, which investigated 27 vaccines, were included in this review. Information from each trial was compiled for vaccine target, vaccine platform, adjuvant inclusion, clinical trial phase, and results. As we look forward, there are currently three vaccines in phase III clinical trials which could provide significant improvement over seasonal influenza vaccines. This systematic review of universal influenza vaccine clinical trials during the 2010-2019 decade provides an update on the progress towards an improved influenza vaccine.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v12101186DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7589362PMC
October 2020

SARS-CoV-2 immunity: review and applications to phase 3 vaccine candidates.

Lancet 2020 11 13;396(10262):1595-1606. Epub 2020 Oct 13.

Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Understanding immune responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is crucial to understanding disease pathogenesis and the usefulness of bridge therapies, such as hyperimmune globulin and convalescent human plasma, and to developing vaccines, antivirals, and monoclonal antibodies. A mere 11 months ago, the canvas we call COVID-19 was blank. Scientists around the world have worked collaboratively to fill in this blank canvas. In this Review, we discuss what is currently known about human humoral and cellular immune responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and relate this knowledge to the COVID-19 vaccines currently in phase 3 clinical trials.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)32137-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7553736PMC
November 2020

SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Development: Current Status.

Mayo Clin Proc 2020 10 30;95(10):2172-2188. Epub 2020 Jul 30.

Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

In the midst of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic and its attendant morbidity and mortality, safe and efficacious vaccines are needed that induce protective and long-lived immune responses. More than 120 vaccine candidates worldwide are in various preclinical and phase 1 to 3 clinical trials that include inactivated, live-attenuated, viral-vectored replicating and nonreplicating, protein- and peptide-based, and nucleic acid approaches. Vaccines will be necessary both for individual protection and for the safe development of population-level herd immunity. Public-private partnership collaborative efforts, such as the Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines mechanism, are key to rapidly identifying safe and effective vaccine candidates as quickly and efficiently as possible. In this article, we review the major vaccine approaches being taken and issues that must be resolved in the quest for vaccines to prevent coronavirus disease 2019. For this study, we scanned the PubMed database from 1963 to 2020 for all publications using the following search terms in various combinations: SARS, MERS, COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, vaccine, clinical trial, coronavirus, pandemic, and vaccine development. We also did a Web search for these same terms. In addition, we examined the World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other public health authority websites. We excluded abstracts and all articles that were not written in English.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2020.07.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7392072PMC
October 2020

Rationing of Civilian Coronavirus Disease 2019 Vaccines While Supplies Are Limited.

J Infect Dis 2020 Nov;222(11):1776-1779

Mayo Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiaa569DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7499655PMC
November 2020

Introduction to Perspectives.

Authors:
Gregory A Poland

Vaccine 2020 09 29;38(41):6347. Epub 2020 Aug 29.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.08.026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7455789PMC
September 2020

SARS-CoV-2 Infections: An ACE in the Hole and Systems Biology Studies-a Research Agenda.

Mayo Clin Proc 2020 09 2;95(9):1838-1841. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

NCH Internal Medicine Residency Program, Naples, FL; NCH Physician Group, Center for Healthy Living, Naples, FL.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2020.06.044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7330547PMC
September 2020

Immunoinformatic identification of B cell and T cell epitopes in the SARS-CoV-2 proteome.

Sci Rep 2020 08 25;10(1):14179. Epub 2020 Aug 25.

Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Guggenheim Building 611C, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.

A novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) emerged from China in late 2019 and rapidly spread across the globe, infecting millions of people and generating societal disruption on a level not seen since the 1918 influenza pandemic. A safe and effective vaccine is desperately needed to prevent the continued spread of SARS-CoV-2; yet, rational vaccine design efforts are currently hampered by the lack of knowledge regarding viral epitopes targeted during an immune response, and the need for more in-depth knowledge on betacoronavirus immunology. To that end, we developed a computational workflow using a series of open-source algorithms and webtools to analyze the proteome of SARS-CoV-2 and identify putative T cell and B cell epitopes. Utilizing a set of stringent selection criteria to filter peptide epitopes, we identified 41 T cell epitopes (5 HLA class I, 36 HLA class II) and 6 B cell epitopes that could serve as promising targets for peptide-based vaccine development against this emerging global pathogen. To our knowledge, this is the first study to comprehensively analyze all 10 (structural, non-structural and accessory) proteins from SARS-CoV-2 using predictive algorithms to identify potential targets for vaccine development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-70864-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7447814PMC
August 2020

A global agenda for older adult immunization in the COVID-19 era: A roadmap for action.

Vaccine 2020 Jul 3. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

Given our global interconnectedness, the COVID-19 pandemic highlights the urgency of building a global system that can support both routine and pandemic/epidemic adult immunization. As such, a framework to recommend vaccines and build robust platforms to deliver them to protect the rapidly expanding demographic of older adults is needed. Adult immunization as a strategy has the broad potential to preserve and improve medical, social, and economic outcomes, including maintaining functional ability that benefits older adults, their families, communities, and countries. While we will soon have multiple vaccines against COVID-19, we must recognize that we already have a variety of vaccines against other pathogens that can keep adults healthier. They can prevent simultaneous co-infection with COVID-19, and may favorably impact- the outcome of a COVID-19 illness. Further, administering a vaccine against COVID-19 requires planning now to determine delivery strategies impacting how older adults will be immunized in a timely manner. A group of international experts with various backgrounds from health and aging disciplines met to discuss the evidence case for adult immunization and crucial knowledge gaps that must be filled in order to implement effective policies and programs for older adult immunization. This group, coming together as the International Council on Adult Immunization (ICAI), outlined a high-level roadmap to catalyze action, provide policy guidance, and envision a global adult immunization platform that can be adapted by countries to fit their local contexts. Further meetings centered around the value of adult immunization, particularly in the context of COVID-19. There was agreement that programs to deliver existing influenza, pneumococcal, herpes zoster vaccines, and future COVID-19 vaccines to over a billion older adults who are at substantially higher risk of death and disability due to vaccine-preventable diseases are more urgent than ever before. Here we present a proposed framework for delivering routine and pandemic vaccines. We call upon the global community and governments to prioritize action for integrating robust adult immunization programs into the public health agenda.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.06.082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7332930PMC
July 2020

Current Challenges in Vaccinology.

Front Immunol 2020 25;11:1181. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States.

The development of vaccines, which prime the immune system to respond to future infections, has led to global declines in morbidity and mortality from dreadful infectious communicable diseases. However, many pathogens of public health importance are highly complex and/or rapidly evolving, posing unique challenges to vaccine development. Several of these challenges include an incomplete understanding of how immunity develops, host and pathogen genetic variability, and an increased societal skepticism regarding vaccine safety. In particular, new high-dimensional omics technologies, aided by bioinformatics, are driving new vaccine development (vaccinomics). Informed by recent insights into pathogen biology, host genetic diversity, and immunology, the increasing use of genomic approaches is leading to new models and understanding of host immune system responses that may provide solutions in the rapid development of novel vaccine candidates.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.01181DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7329983PMC
June 2020

The role of host genetics in the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 susceptibility and severity.

Immunol Rev 2020 07 13;296(1):205-219. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

This article provides a review of studies evaluating the role of host (and viral) genetics (including variation in HLA genes) in the immune response to coronaviruses, as well as the clinical outcome of coronavirus-mediated disease. The initial sections focus on seasonal coronaviruses, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV. We then examine the state of the knowledge regarding genetic polymorphisms and SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19. The article concludes by discussing research areas with current knowledge gaps and proposes several avenues for future scientific exploration in order to develop new insights into the immunology of SARS-CoV-2.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imr.12897DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7404857PMC
July 2020

Expression of concern: "Could the multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) control Neisseria meningitidis capsular group X outbreaks in Africa?" and "Bactericidal antibody against a representative epidemiological meningococcal serogroup".

Authors:
Gregory A Poland

Vaccine 2020 07 2;38(35):5577. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Mayo Vaccine Research Group, 611C Guggenheim Building, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.06.048DOI Listing
July 2020

Tortoises, hares, and vaccines: A cautionary note for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development.

Authors:
Gregory A Poland

Vaccine 2020 06 1;38(27):4219-4220. Epub 2020 May 1.

Mayo Vaccine Research Group, 611C Guggenheim Building, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.04.073DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7252125PMC
June 2020

SARS-CoV-2: a time for clear and immediate action.

Authors:
Gregory A Poland

Lancet Infect Dis 2020 05 31;20(5):531-532. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Department of Medicine, Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30250-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7195605PMC
May 2020

Potential impact of contaminated bronchoscopes on novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2020 Jul 2;41(7):862-864. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2020.102DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7200838PMC
July 2020

Immunization of healthcare personnel in Europe: Time to move forward with a common program.

Vaccine 2020 04 12;38(16):3187-3190. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Mayo Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, 200 First Street, Rochester, MN 55905, United States.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.02.090DOI Listing
April 2020

Another coronavirus, another epidemic, another warning.

Authors:
Gregory A Poland

Vaccine 2020 02;38(10):v-vi

Mary Lowell Leary Emeritus Professor of Medicine, USA; Distinguished Investigator of the Mayo Clinic, USA; Director, Mayo Vaccine Research Group, USA; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.02.039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7131387PMC
February 2020