Publications by authors named "Graça Sousa"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Giant major aortopulmonary collateral artery: a rare cause of heart murmur in newborns.

Rev Port Cardiol 2014 Jul-Aug;33(7-8):483-5. Epub 2014 Jul 31.

Serviço de Cardiologia, Hospital Pediátrico, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.repc.2014.02.002DOI Listing
July 2016

[Infective endocarditis as a form of late presentation of congenital heart disease].

Rev Port Cardiol 2013 Feb 22;32(2):145-8. Epub 2013 Jan 22.

Serviço de Cardiologia Pediátrica, Hospital Pediátrico Carmona da Mota, Coimbra, Portugal.

A diagnosis of congenital heart disease is usually established at an early age, so infective endocarditis is a rare form of presentation. The authors describe the case of a male adolescent with a week-long history of intermittent fever and unquantified weight loss. Physical examination detected pansystolic and diastolic murmurs, and an associated precordial thrill. Laboratory tests showed evidence of an active infection. Etiological investigation revealed a perimembranous ventricular septal defect, aortic regurgitation, and aortic and mitral valve vegetations. A diagnosis of mitral-aortic infective endocarditis was made and he was started on intravenous antibiotics and anticongestive therapy. After initial clinical improvement, he developed symptoms and signs of congestive heart failure. Repeat echocardiography showed an extensive mitral-aortic paravalvular abscess. The antibiotics were changed and anticongestive therapy was intensified, and he subsequently underwent surgery. The outcome has been generally favorable, and at present he is asymptomatic under anticongestive therapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.repc.2012.05.023DOI Listing
February 2013

[Asymptomatic cardiac tumor in a child: an incidental diagnosis].

Rev Port Cardiol 2011 Oct;30(10):795-7

Serviço de Cardiologia Pediátrica, Hospital Pediátrico de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

Cardiac tumors in the pediatric population are rare, their incidence range between 0.001% and 0.003%. They are mostly benign, rhabdomyomas the most common type, followed by fibromas. The clinical features are being usually nonspecific and depend on the size and location of the tumor within the heart. We report the case of a previously healthy four-year-old boy referred for flu-like symptoms. A respiratory infection was suspected and a chest X-ray showed an increased cardiothoracic index. An echocardiogram revealed a single large heterogeneous mass in the left ventricle emerging from the lateral wall. Despite its size, the mass did not obstruct the left ventricular outflow tract or affect mitral valve function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showed a large mass whose imaging features were suggestive of a fibroma. He became symptomatic during follow-up and was referred for surgical excision of the mass. Histological study confirmed a fibroma. At present the patient remains asymptomatic.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0870-2551(11)70028-2DOI Listing
October 2011

Left ventricular noncompaction: analysis of a pediatric population.

Rev Port Cardiol 2011 Mar;30(3):295-311

Serviço de Cardiologia Pediátrica do Hospital Pediátrico de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

Introduction: Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a rare and potentially progressive cardiomyopathy, characterized by the persistence of multiple trabeculations and deep intratrabecular recesses in the ventricular myocardium. Although two-dimensional and color Doppler echocardiography are the most useful diagnostic modalities, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging has proved to have high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of this anomaly.

Objective: To characterize the clinical and imaging features of LVNC in a pediatric population and to assess their evolution.

Methods And Results: We performed a retrospective chart review of five pediatric patients with LVNC, followed at Coimbra Pediatric Hospital between January 1999 and December 2007. Median age at presentation was five months (ranging from one day to 13 years), and they were mainly male (1.5:1). Two of the children had a family history of sudden death. In one case the clinical presentation was cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation and in three others, congestive cardiac failure. None of the five cases had associated congenital cardiac anomalies. Involvement of the ventricular apical region was found in all cases. Four children additionally had ventricular dysfunction which improved with diuretic and vasodilator therapy. Mean follow-up was 34 months, ranging from six months to seven years. In one case a change in the morphological phenotype was noted, from a dilated to a hypertrophic form. In this case and in the child's father a mutation in the MYBPC3 gene was identified, which is associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. No thromboembolic phenomena or deaths occurred during the study period.

Conclusion: In the pediatric population, congestive cardiac failure is the most common clinical presentation of LVNC, which can coexist with other cardiomyopathies, particularly dilated and hypertrophic forms. The sample presented in this analysis is statistically non-significant due to its limited size and the authors highlight the need for larger prospective studies in the pediatric population in order to clarify this disease and its diagnostic criteria.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2011

Descending necrotizing mediastinitis presenting as cardiac tamponade.

Rev Port Cardiol 2011 Feb;30(2):243-8

Serviço de Cardiologia Pediátrica do Hospital Pediátrico de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2011

Lung cancer: atypical brain metastases mimicking neurocysticercosis.

Int J Clin Oncol 2011 Dec 25;16(6):746-50. Epub 2011 Mar 25.

Department of Pulmonology, Hospital de São João, Alameda Professor Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal.

The authors describe a case of a 47-year-old male smoker with a 3-month history of hearing loss, tinnitus and dizziness. Physical examination revealed neurosensory hearing loss. Small rounded hypodensities without mass effect were evident in a computed tomography scan of the head, confirmed by brain magnetic resonance imaging as multiple cystic lesions in both cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres, without perilesional edema or gadolinium enhancement, suggestive of neurocysticercosis. Extraparenchymal involvement was also noted. Albendazole and dexamethasone were started. As a chest radiograph showed a bilateral reticulonodular pattern, a bronchoscopy was performed showing normal results. However, transbronchial biopsy revealed lung adenocarcinoma. Thoracoabdominopelvic computed tomography scan showed secondary lung and bone lesions. Since brain lesions were not suggestive of secondary tumor lesions, a brain biopsy was performed confirming metastatic disease. This case illustrates some peculiar imagiological features of brain metastases in lung cancer, indicating that sometimes invasive procedures are required to establish a definitive diagnosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10147-011-0221-7DOI Listing
December 2011

Lung cancer: atypical brain metastases mimicking neurocysticercosis.

Int J Clin Oncol 2011 Dec 25;16(6):746-50. Epub 2011 Mar 25.

Department of Pulmonology, Hospital de São João, Alameda Professor Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal.

The authors describe a case of a 47-year-old male smoker with a 3-month history of hearing loss, tinnitus and dizziness. Physical examination revealed neurosensory hearing loss. Small rounded hypodensities without mass effect were evident in a computed tomography scan of the head, confirmed by brain magnetic resonance imaging as multiple cystic lesions in both cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres, without perilesional edema or gadolinium enhancement, suggestive of neurocysticercosis. Extraparenchymal involvement was also noted. Albendazole and dexamethasone were started. As a chest radiograph showed a bilateral reticulonodular pattern, a bronchoscopy was performed showing normal results. However, transbronchial biopsy revealed lung adenocarcinoma. Thoracoabdominopelvic computed tomography scan showed secondary lung and bone lesions. Since brain lesions were not suggestive of secondary tumor lesions, a brain biopsy was performed confirming metastatic disease. This case illustrates some peculiar imagiological features of brain metastases in lung cancer, indicating that sometimes invasive procedures are required to establish a definitive diagnosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10147-011-0221-7DOI Listing
December 2011

Coronary and systemic aneurysms in an infant with Kawasaki disease.

Pediatr Cardiol 2009 May 14;30(4):568-9. Epub 2009 Apr 14.

Serviço de Cardiologia Pediátrica, Hospital Pediátrico de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00246-009-9429-yDOI Listing
May 2009