Publications by authors named "Goran Pavlek"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Concomitant Presence of Hydatid Cyst and Colorectal Liver Metastasis

Turkiye Parazitol Derg 2021 06;45(2):146-148

University Hospital Centre Zagreb Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Zagreb, Croatia

A 65-year-old man, with signs of acute colon obstruction, was diagnosed with rectal tumour and liver hydatid cyst. Additionally, a focal liver lesion in segment 1 was detected. Moreover, physical examination revealed hepatomegaly and abdominal distension. Thus, rectal resection and small liver lesion biopsy was performed. Serological and pathohistological analyses showed concomitant presence of hydatid cyst and colorectal metastasis in the liver. Hence, the cyst was treated with anthelmintic therapy, and patient lived another year after the diagnosis. To the best of our knowledge, cases of concomitant hydatid cyst and colorectal liver metastasis has never been reported; thus, this article addresses a unique case of coexistence between these two serious liver diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4274/tpd.galenos.2020.7001DOI Listing
June 2021

Abdominal wall reconstruction after emergent surgery for fistulizing incarcerated ventral wall hernia in morbidly obese patient.

Pol Przegl Chir 2020 Oct;93(2):1-5

Department of Surgery, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Croatia.

Background: Incarcerated abdominal wall hernias may have a variety of manifestations and the most dreaded consequence is strangulation leading to obstruction and perforation of hollow viscus. Very rarely, such a perforation presents with fistulization into the abdominal wall and skin, which is often not considered but may complicate the management approach. <br/>Case presentation: We reported on presentation and management of a 56-year-old morbidly obese male with a fistulizing incarcerated ventral wall hernia and postoperative abdominal wall necrosis. <br/>Discussion: Contained bowel perforations caused by ventral hernia incarceration are a rare and not well recognized problem and are confined to a handful of case reports in the surgical literature. <br/>Conclusion: The most recognized complications of ventral hernias are incarceration and strangulation leading to obstruction and consequent perforation; however, as the case described below reveals, intestinal perforation and bowel-skin fistulization may occur as unusual incident. Management should involve operative reduction, resection of the involved bowel and staged repair of abdominal wall defect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5604/ 01.3001.0014.475DOI Listing
October 2020

Isolated liver tuberculoma infiltrating anterior abdominal wall and skin.

Liver Int 2021 05 20;41(5):1129-1130. Epub 2020 Dec 20.

Dom zdravlja Centar Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/liv.14764DOI Listing
May 2021

Rupture of suppurated liver hematoma into the anterior abdominal wall in a patient with Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome.

Cir Cir 2020 ;88(Suppl 2):66-70

Department of Surgery. University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.

We report a case of ruptured liver hematoma as a result of suppurated arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in a patient with Rendu-Osler-Weber (ROW) syndrome. The patient presented with unexplained fever and upper right abdominal pain associated with microcytic anemia. A computed tomography scan revealed increasing subcapsular liver hematoma and features of liver abscess. Intraoperatively, a left liver hematoma mixed with pus was found that was attached to the anterior abdominal wall. Surgery included left lateral bisegmentectomy, while pathohistological analysis showed AVM and genetic tests confirmed ROW. This is the first such life-threatening surgical case of ROW complication reported in the scientific literature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.24875/CIRU.20000342DOI Listing
January 2020

Urgent Surgical Treatment of GIST of Esophago-Gastric Junction in a Patient with Giant Hiatal Hernia.

Klin Onkol 2019 ;32(4):306-309

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), being the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, arise most commonly in stomach (60-70%) and small intestine (20-25%) while other sites of origin are rare. In most cases, they are diagnosed accidentally due to their indolent clinical course; however, 10-30% have malignant potential. Gastric and esophageal GISTs carry a better prognosis than small bowel GISTs of similar size and mitotic rate. Complete surgical resection is the only potentially curative procedure, but despite its success, at least 50% of patients develop recurrence or metastases. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib gave positive results in treatment of unresectable, metastatic or recurrent GISTs. We present the case of a 69-year-old woman with a large unresectable GIST of esophago-gastric junction with multiple bilobar liver metastases who underwent an emergent palliative surgery due to diffuse bleeding from the tumor. Twelve months after the surgery, patient is still alive and stable under imatinib therapy with no signs of local recurrence of the disease. This example suggests that patients with locally advanced GISTs with distant metastases may benefit from surgery in terms of prolonged survival and quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14735/amko2019306DOI Listing
January 2020

Fatal Case of Spontaneous Rectus Sheath Hematoma Caused by Anticoagulant and Steroid Therapy during Hospital Admission.

Visc Med 2018 Jul 31;34(3):225-227. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Department of Surgery, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.

Background: Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is a rare but potentially dangerous clinical entity that requires medical supervision.

Case Report: Here we discuss one such case which describes the fatal course of spontaneous RSH during hospital admission.

Conclusion: Usually, RSH presents as a minimal abdominal wall swelling with self-limiting course but in the case of hematoma and size progression, specific conservative or invasive measures are necessary to prevent serious complications including hypovolemic shock and death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000485941DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6103341PMC
July 2018

A Synchronous Occurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Echinoccocal Liver Cyst - Can Parasite Promote Carcinogenesis? Literature Review and Classification Proposal.

Chirurgia (Bucur) 2016 Jul-Aug;111(4):297-303

Concomitant presence of hydatid cyst and hepatocellular carcinoma is a very rare clinical scenario especially in a previously non-diseased liver. Including our case here reported, there are 12 cases of synchronous HCC and hydatid cyst found in the scientific literature and 3 of them were found in a patient with non-diseased liver. We provide detailed review of all reported cases with additional highlights on etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of both HCC and echinococcal disease. Although there is a small number of patients, possible relation between these 2 liver lesions should be investigated and standardized classification should be established. This will help us to understand the nature of HCC carcinogenesis, identify diagnostic features of liver lesions and choose the most appropriate type of treatment.
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February 2017

Ankle metastasis as a sign of intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma.

Hepatobiliary Surg Nutr 2015 Oct;4(5):369-70

Department of Surgery, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3978/j.issn.2304-3881.2015.06.05DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4607838PMC
October 2015

Cystic echinococcosis of lung and heart coupled with repeated echinococcosis of brain--a case report.

Coll Antropol 2011 Dec;35(4):1311-5

University of Split, Split University Hospital Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Split, Croatia.

Echinococcosis is rarely encountered as a cystic brain disease. In this article we are presenting a case of a young woman repeatedly operated due to echinococcosis of lung, heart and brain. Recurrent brain ecchinococcosis developed despite preoperative and postoperative albendazol therapy after first and combined therapy with albendazol and praziquantel after the second brain surgery. The mechanism of recurrence remains unclear (primary infestation, dissemination after spontaneous or intraoperative cyst rupture or new infestation).
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December 2011
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