Publications by authors named "Gong-Hyeon Lee"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The ethanol extract from the rhodophyta Gloiopeltis furcata and its active ingredient docosahexaenoic acid improve exercise performance in mice.

J Food Biochem 2019 09 15;43(9):e12980. Epub 2019 Jul 15.

Department of Biotechnology, Pukyong National University, Busan, Republic of Korea.

The effectiveness of natural bioresources at enhancing exercise performance is of interest to those in sports and health care. The use of 29 common seaweed species as supplements to enhance exercise performance and the recovery from physical fatigue was evaluated. The ethanol extract of the red seaweed Gloiopeltis furcata (GFE) had the greatest effect on forelimb grip strength and swimming endurance in mice. The optimal daily dose of GFE was 0.1 mg per 10 μl per g of body weight. GFE significantly increased muscle mass but had little effect on body weight and fatty deposits. The extract also significantly raised the blood superoxide dismutase and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, while reducing the lactate and urea levels (p < 0.05). Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from GFE made the greatest contribution to improving physical exercise performance. These results support the use of GFE and DHA in health food products for enhancing physical performance. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS: The study shows the exercise enhancement and anti-fatigue activities of GFE using the forelimb grip strength test, forced swimming endurance test, muscle mass measurement, and blood biochemical parameters. These results support the use of GFE and its active constituent DHA in functional foods or nutraceuticals for enhancing physical performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfbc.12980DOI Listing
September 2019

Hot Water Extract of Leather Carp (Cyprinus carpio nudus) Improves Exercise Performance in Mice.

Prev Nutr Food Sci 2015 Dec 31;20(4):246-52. Epub 2015 Dec 31.

Department of Biotechnology, Pukyong National University, Busan 48513, Korea.

The hot water extract of leather carp (Cyprinus carpio nudus) has been used as a nourishing tonic soup and as an aid for recovery from physical fatigue. In this study, we investigated the effect of leather carp extract on exercise performance in mice. Swimming endurance and forelimb grip strength were assessed following oral administration of the extract (once per day for 7 days) at a dose of 0.5 mg/10 μL/g body weight. After 7 days, mice given the leather carp extract had significantly greater swimming endurance [105±18 s (P<0.05); 52% longer than day 0] and forelimb grip strength [1.18±0.05 Newton (P<0.01); 17% greater than day 0]. The extract increased muscle mass, but had little effect on body weight. Following the swimming exercise, blood glucose, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase levels in extract-fed mice were significantly higher (145%, 131%, and 106%, respectively) than in the saline control group. Blood levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were also significantly increased (128%) in mice given the extract compared to the controls. These results suggest that leather carp extract can improve physical exercise performance and prevent oxidative stress caused by exhaustive workouts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3746/pnf.2015.20.4.246DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4700913PMC
December 2015

Oral Administration of a Hot Water Extract of the Softshell Turtle (Trionyx sinensis) Improves Exercise Performance.

Prev Nutr Food Sci 2015 Jun 30;20(2):133-6. Epub 2015 Jun 30.

Department of Biotechnology, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737, Korea.

Freshwater softshell turtle (Trionyx sinensis) extract has been used traditionally as a tonic soup, and to recover from physical fatigue. To support these claims, the forelimb grip strength of mice was measured after feeding a soft-shell turtle extract for 7 days. The T. sinensis extract significantly increased the grip strength to 1.25±0.07 N (P<0.01), which is 16.8% higher than the force on day 0. After exercising, the blood glucose levels in extract-fed mice were 202% higher and urea levels were 73% lower, which were both significantly different than the levels observed after control treatment. Lactate dehydrogenase was significantly higher by 314%, and glutathione peroxidase increased by 165%. In addition, the obesity markers, serum triglyceride and cholesterol, decreased to 62% and 49%, respectively, after mice were fed the extract. These data show that the T. sinensis extract provided more energy for forelimb exercise, prevented protein catabolism and muscle fatigue, and decreased the oxidative stress caused by an exhaustive workout.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3746/pnf.2015.20.2.133DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4500516PMC
June 2015
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