Publications by authors named "Gloria Salinas"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Diabetes screen during tuberculosis contact investigations highlights opportunity for new diabetes diagnosis and reveals metabolic differences between ethnic groups.

Tuberculosis (Edinb) 2018 12 18;113:10-18. Epub 2018 Aug 18.

DST-NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Tuberculosis Research, South African Medical Research Council Centre for Tuberculosis Research, Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa; Mater Research Institute - The University of Queensland, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Electronic address:

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a prevalent risk factor for tuberculosis (TB), but most studies on TB-T2D have focused on TB patients, been limited to one community, and shown a variable impact of T2D on TB risk or treatment outcomes. We conducted a cross-sectional assessment of sociodemographic and metabolic factors in adult TB contacts with T2D (versus no T2D), from the Texas-Mexico border to study Hispanics, and in Cape Town to study South African Coloured ethnicities. The prevalence of T2D was 30.2% in Texas-Mexico and 17.4% in South Africa, with new diagnosis in 34.4% and 43.9%, respectively. Contacts with T2D differed between ethnicities, with higher smoking, hormonal contraceptive use and cholesterol levels in South Africa, and higher obesity in Texas-Mexico (p < 0.05). PCA analysis revealed striking differences between ethnicities in the relationships between factors defining T2D and dyslipidemias. Our findings suggest that screening for new T2D in adult TB contacts is effective to identify new T2D patients at risk for TB. Furthermore, studies aimed at predicting individual TB risk in T2D patients, should take into account the heterogeneity in dyslipidemias that are likely to modify the estimates of TB risk or adverse treatment outcomes that are generally attributed to T2D alone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tube.2018.08.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6284235PMC
December 2018

A missed tuberculosis diagnosis resulting in hospital transmission.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2014 May 14;35(5):534-7. Epub 2014 Mar 14.

Hidalgo County Health and Human Services, Edinburg, Texas.

Objective: To find the source of tuberculin skin test conversions among 38 hospital employees on 1 floor during routine testing January-February 2010.

Methods: Record review of patients at a private hospital during September-December 2009 and interviews with hospital employees. Names of patients from the state tuberculosis (TB) registry were cross-referenced with hospital records for admissions. Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotype results in the county and adjacent counties were examined, and contacts were evaluated for TB infection and disease.

Results: One of the 38 employees, a nurse, was diagnosed with pulmonary TB with a matching M. tuberculosis genotype and drug resistance pattern (isoniazid monoresistant) to those of a county jail inmate also recently diagnosed with pulmonary TB. The nurse had no known contact with that inmate; however, another inmate in his 20's from the same jail had been hospitalized under that nurse's care in October 2009. That young man died, and a postmortem examination result subsequently confirmed TB, which had not been suspected. Exposure to this man with undiagnosed TB could explain the transmission: 87 (27%) of the 318 hospital-based contacts without previous positive tuberculin skin test results were infected, and 9 contacts had active TB.

Conclusions: This investigation demonstrated M. tuberculosis transmission in a hospital due to a missed diagnosis and nonadherence to national TB infection control guidelines. Routine TB screening of employees allowed early detection of this missed TB diagnosis, facilitating prompt evaluation of contacts. Healthcare providers should suspect TB in symptomatic persons and adhere to TB control policies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/675833DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5019171PMC
May 2014