Publications by authors named "Giuseppina Vonella"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Delineation of the phenotype associated with 7q36.1q36.2 deletion: long QT syndrome, renal hypoplasia and mental retardation.

Am J Med Genet A 2008 May;146A(9):1195-9

Medical Genetics, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Terminal deletions of the long arm of chromosome 7 are well known and are frequently associated with hypotelorism or holoprosencephaly due to the involvement of the SHH gene located in 7q36.3. These deletions are easily detectable with routine subtelomeric MLPA analysis. Deletions affecting a more proximal part of 7q36, namely bands 7q36.1q36.2 are less common, and may be missed by subtelomeric MLPA analysis. We report a 9-year-old girl with a 5.27 Mb deletion in 7q36.1q36.2, and compare her to literature patients proposing a phenotype characterized by mental retardation, unusual facial features, renal hypoplasia and long QT syndrome due to loss of the KCNH2 gene. These characteristics are sufficiently distinct that the syndrome may be diagnosed on clinical grounds.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.32197DOI Listing
May 2008

New neurocutaneous syndrome with defect in cell trafficking and melanosome pathway: the future challenge.

Brain Dev 2008 Aug 28;30(7):461-8. Epub 2008 Jan 28.

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Pediatrics Neurology and Pediatrics Neuropsychiatric Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Policlinico Le Scotte, University of Siena, Viale Bracci, I-53100 Siena, Italy.

Objective: Case study of a CNS impairment lacking in presumptive cause; case presents with a clinical phenotype encompassing multiple differently expressed and combined symptoms, as well as a subtle skin defect.

Materials And Methods: A 6-year-old male with apparently isolated mental delay, speech delay, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and subtle and insignificant skin dyschromias. The patient underwent a systematic evaluation, including clinical history; medical, neurological and ophthalmologic examinations. Skin, teeth, nails, hair and sudation were examined for defects. Routine laboratory tests for blood, urine, were performed. The proband had thyroid function tests, electrocardiography, genitourinary system and abdominal examinations. Special examinations pertaining to mental performance, biochemistry, chromosome studies, imaging and electrodiagnostic studies, and skin biopsy were also performed.

Results: Investigators ruled out genetic syndromes, congenital infections, fetal deprivation, perinatal insults, intrauterine exposure to drug abuse, and postnatal events such as CNS infections as possible common causes of brain impairment. Being all further test negative, the patient exhibited an ultrastructural defect of the skin, identical to that previously described [Buoni S, Zannolli R, de Santi MM, Macucci F, Hayek J, Orsi A et al. Neurocutaneous syndrome with mental delay, autism, blockage in intracellular vesicular trafficking and melanosome defects. Eur J Neurol 2006;13:842-51], suggesting that some cell compartments, such as rough endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, Golgi apparatus, and the vesicular zone (racket) of Birbeck granules, sharing similar components, can be altered, resulting in a common defect in cell trafficking, associated to melanosome defects.

Conclusions: This new devasting, ultrastructural phenotype accompanied by apparently unspecific and mixed neurological symptoms should represent a future challenge to finally discover the pathogenesis of many childhood CNS symptoms, that currently seem to lack any apparent cause.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2007.12.008DOI Listing
August 2008

Polydactyly with ectodermal defect, osteopenia, and mental delay.

J Child Neurol 2008 Jun 8;23(6):683-9. Epub 2008 Jan 8.

Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Reproductive Medicine, Section of Pediatrics, Policlinico Le Scotte, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Five members from 3 generations, including a 35-year-old woman and her 2 sons, both mentally impaired to a different degree, were studied in a tertiary care hospital. Anamnestic, clinical, neurological, and radiological evaluations were used to describe phenotypes. A and B postaxial polydactyly, transmitted likely as autosomal dominant, was associated with an extensive variability of phenotypic features: (1) cutaneous syndactyly, (2) nail-teeth dysplasia, (3) osteopenia, and (4) mental delay. The likelihood that the constellation of observations we report here is caused by mutation of a single gene that subsequently affects multiple physiological activities, although fascinating, remains to be proven. Instead, we hypothesize that it likely develops as a contiguous gene syndrome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073807309778DOI Listing
June 2008

MECP2 deletions and genotype-phenotype correlation in Rett syndrome.

Am J Med Genet A 2007 Dec;143A(23):2775-84

Medical Genetics, Molecular Biology Department, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that represents one of the most common genetic causes of mental retardation in girls. MECP2 point mutations in exons 2-4 account for about 80% of classic Rett cases and for a lower percentage of variant patients. We investigated the genetic cause in 77 mutation-negative Rett patients (33 classic, 31 variant, and 13 Rett-like cases) by searching missed MECP2 defects. DHPLC analysis of exon 1 and MLPA analysis allowed us to identify the defect in 17 Rett patients: one exon 1 point mutation (c.47_57del) in a classic case and 16 MECP2 large deletions (15/33 classic and 1/31 variant cases). One identical intragenic MECP2 deletion, probably due to gonadal mosaicism, was found in two sisters with discordant phenotype: one classic and one "highly functioning" preserved speech variant. This result indicates that other epigenetic or genetic factors, beside MECP2, may contribute to phenotype modulation. Three out of 16 MECP2 deletions extend to the adjacent centromeric IRAK1 gene. A putative involvement of the hemizygosity of this gene in the ossification process is discussed. Finally, results reported here clearly indicate that MECP2 large deletions are a common cause of classic Rett, and MLPA analysis is mandatory in MECP2-negative patients, especially in those more severely affected (P = 0.044).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.32002DOI Listing
December 2007