Publications by authors named "Giuseppe S Alvaro"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of Kv3 channel modulators on auditory temporal resolution in aged Fischer 344 rats.

Hear Res 2021 Mar 8;401:108139. Epub 2020 Dec 8.

Department of Auditory Neuroscience, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

AUT00063 and AUT00202 are novel pharmaceutical modulators of the Kv3 subfamily of voltage-gated K channels. Kv3.1 channels, which control fast firing of many central auditory neurons, have been shown to decline with age and this may contribute to age-related deficits in central auditory processing. In the present study, the effects of the two novel compounds that specifically modulate Kv3 channels on auditory temporal processing were examined in aged (19-25-month-old) and young-adult (3-5 month-old) Fischer 344 rats (F344) using a behavioral gap-prepulse inhibition (gap-PPI) paradigm. The acoustic startle response (ASR) and its inhibition induced by a gap in noise were measured before and after drug administration. Hearing thresholds in tested rats were evaluated by the auditory brainstem response (ABR). Aged F344 rats had significantly higher ABR thresholds, lower amplitudes of ASR, and weaker gap-PPI compared with young-adult rats. No influence of AUT00063 and AUT00202 administration was observed on ABR hearing thresholds in rats of both age groups. AUT00063 and AUT00202 had suppressive effect on ASR of F344 rats that was more pronounced with AUT00063. The degree of suppression depended on the dose and age of the rats. Both compounds significantly improved the gap-PPI performance in gap detection tests in aged rats. These results indicate that AUT00063 and AUT00202 may influence intrinsic firing properties of neurons in the central auditory system of aged animals and have the potential to treat aged-related hearing disorders.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2020.108139DOI Listing
March 2021

Antimanic Efficacy of a Novel Kv3 Potassium Channel Modulator.

Neuropsychopharmacology 2018 Jan 31;43(2):435-444. Epub 2017 Aug 31.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 voltage-gated potassium channels are expressed on parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons in corticolimbic brain regions and contribute to high-frequency neural firing. The channels are also expressed on GABAergic neurons of the basal ganglia, substantia nigra, and ventral tegmental area (VTA) where they regulate firing patterns critical for movement control, reward, and motivation. Modulation of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels may therefore have potential in the treatment of disorders in which these systems have been implicated, such as bipolar disorder. Following the recent development of a potassium channel modulator, AUT1-an imidazolidinedione compound that specifically increases currents mediated by Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels in recombinant systems-we report that the compound is able to reverse 'manic-like' behavior in two mouse models: amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and ClockΔ19 mutants. AUT1 completely prevented amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in a dose-dependent manner, similar to the atypical antipsychotic, clozapine. Similar efficacy was observed in Kv3.2 knockout mice. In contrast, AUT1 was unable to prevent amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in mice lacking Kv3.1 channels. Notably, Kv3.1-null mice displayed baseline hyperlocomotion, reduced anxiety-like behavior, and antidepressant-like behavior. In ClockΔ19 mice, AUT1 reversed hyperactivity. Furthermore, AUT1 application modulated firing frequency and action potential properties of ClockΔ19 VTA dopamine neurons potentially through network effects. Kv3.1 protein levels in the VTA of ClockΔ19 and WT mice were unaltered by acute AUT1 treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that the modulation of Kv3.1 channels may provide a novel approach to the treatment of bipolar mania.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2017.155DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5729564PMC
January 2018

The efficacy of sodium channel blockers to prevent phencyclidine-induced cognitive dysfunction in the rat: potential for novel treatments for schizophrenia.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2011 Jul 12;338(1):100-13. Epub 2011 Apr 12.

Neuroscience Centre of Excellence for Drug Discovery, Medicines Research Centre, GlaxoSmithKline SpA., Verona, Italy.

Sodium channel inhibition is a well precedented mechanism used to treat epilepsy and other hyperexcitability disorders. The established sodium channel blocker and broad-spectrum anticonvulsant lamotrigine is also effective in the treatment of bipolar disorder and has been evaluated in patients with schizophrenia. Double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials found that the drug has potential to reduce cognitive symptoms of the disorder. However, because of compound-related side-effects and the need for dose titration, a conclusive evaluation of the drug's efficacy in patients with schizophrenia has not been possible. (5R)-5-(4-{[(2-Fluorophenyl)methyl]oxy}phenyl)-l-prolinamide (GSK2) and (2R,5R)-2-(4-{[(2-fluorophenyl)methyl]oxy}phenyl)-7-methyl-1,7-diazaspiro[4.4]nonan-6-one (GSK3) are two new structurally diverse sodium channel blockers with potent anticonvulsant activity. In this series of studies in the rat, we compared the efficacy of the two new molecules to prevent a cognitive deficit induced by the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) in the reversal-learning paradigm in the rat. We also explored the effects of the drugs to prevent brain activation and neurochemical effects of PCP. We found that, like lamotrigine, both GSK2 and GSK3 were able to prevent the deficit in reversal learning produced by PCP, thus confirming their potential in the treatment of cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, higher doses than those required for anticonvulsant efficacy of the drugs were needed for activity in the reversal-learning model, suggesting a lower therapeutic window relative to mechanism-dependent central side effects for this indication.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.110.178475DOI Listing
July 2011