Publications by authors named "Giuseppe Bandini"

38 Publications

Transplantation Induces Profound Changes in the Transcriptional Asset of Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Identification of Specific Signatures Using Machine Learning Techniques.

J Clin Med 2020 Jun 1;9(6). Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, 10043 Turin, Italy.

During the phase of proliferation needed for hematopoietic reconstitution following transplantation, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) must express genes involved in stem cell self-renewal. We investigated the expression of genes relevant for self-renewal and expansion of HSPC (operationally defined as CD34+ cells) in steady state and after transplantation. Specifically, we evaluated the expression of ninety-one genes that were analyzed by real-time PCR in CD34+ cells isolated from (i) 12 samples from umbilical cord blood (UCB); (ii) 15 samples from bone marrow healthy donors; (iii) 13 samples from bone marrow after umbilical cord blood transplant (UCBT); and (iv) 29 samples from patients after transplantation with adult hematopoietic cells. The results show that transplanted CD34+ cells from adult cells acquire an asset very different from transplanted CD34+ cells from cord blood. Multivariate machine learning analysis (MMLA) showed that four specific gene signatures can be obtained by comparing the four types of CD34+ cells. In several, but not all cases, transplanted HSPC from UCB overexpress reprogramming genes. However, these remarkable changes do not alter the commitment to hematopoietic lineage. Overall, these results reveal undisclosed aspects of transplantation biology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061670DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7355574PMC
June 2020

Dry Eye Disease Is Already Present in Hematological Patients Before Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Cornea 2016 May;35(5):638-43

*Ophthalmology Unit, DIMES Department, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna and S. Orsola-Malpighi Teaching Hospital, Bologna, Italy; and†Haematology Institute "L.A. Seragnoli," DIMES Department, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna and S. Orsola-Malpighi Teaching Hospital, Bologna, Italy.

Purpose: To analyze ocular surface parameters in patients before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and to correlate them with hematological characteristics.

Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 203 patients undergoing HSCT. Demographic data and hematological parameters (disorder type and stage) were collected from clinical charts. Ocular surface parameters (ocular surface disease index; Schirmer test I; tear film break-up time; corneal esthesiometry; and corneal and conjunctival staining) were analyzed the day before beginning the conditioning treatment for HSCT preparation.

Results: A high prevalence of dry eye (DE) was found: 116 patients (57.2%) were diagnosed as not suffering from DE, whereas 87 patients (42.8%) were diagnosed as having DE. Of these, 26 were classified as dry eye workshot (DEWS) severity score 1, 46 as DEWS score 2, and 15 as DEWS score 3. Tear film break-up time was found to be the only parameter statistically worse in the chronic lymphoproliferative disorder group compared with the stem cell malignancy group. Older age [odds ratio (OR) 1.03], female sex (OR 2.03), advanced stage of hematological disease (OR 1.4), and previous auto- or allo-HSCT (OR 1.9) showed a significant positive association in predicting DE onset before transplantation.

Conclusions: DE was already present in a significant number of patients suffering from hematological disease before HSCT. Some hematological parameters seemed to influence this percentage. These results highlight the role of ocular surface examination by an ophthalmologist in hematological patients before HSCT, with the aim of diagnosing and, if necessary, treating DE patients early.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ICO.0000000000000747DOI Listing
May 2016

Larger Size of Donor Alloreactive NK Cell Repertoire Correlates with Better Response to NK Cell Immunotherapy in Elderly Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

Clin Cancer Res 2016 Apr 19;22(8):1914-21. Epub 2016 Jan 19.

Clinic of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine (DiMI), University of Genoa, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria S. Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy.

Purpose: In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), alloreactive natural killer (NK) cells are crucial mediators of immune responses after haploidentical stem cell transplantation. Allogeneic NK cell infusions have been adoptively transferred with promising clinical results. We aimed at determining whether the composition of NK graft in terms of frequency of alloreactive NK cells influence the clinical response in a group of elderly AML patients undergoing NK immunotherapy.

Experimental Design: Seventeen AML patients, in first complete remission (CR; median age 64 years, range 53-73) received NK cells from haploidentical KIR-ligand-mismatched donors after fludarabine/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy, followed by IL2. To correlate donor NK cell activity with clinical response, donor NK cells were assessed before and after infusion.

Results: Toxicity was moderate, although 1 patient died due to bacterial pneumonia and was censored for clinical follow-up. With a median follow-up of 22.5 months (range, 6-68 months), 9 of 16 evaluable patients (0.56) are alive disease-free, whereas 7 of 16 (0.44) relapsed with a median time to relapse of 9 months (range, 3-51 months). All patients treated with molecular disease achieved molecular CR. A significantly higher number of donor alloreactive NK cell clones was observed in responders over nonresponders. The infusion of higher number of alloreactive NK cells was associated with prolonged disease-free survival (0.81 vs. 0.14, respectively;P= 0.03).

Conclusions: Infusion of purified NK cells is feasible in elderly AML patients as post-CR consolidation strategy. The clinical efficacy of adoptively transferred haploidentical NK cells may be improved by infusing high numbers of alloreactive NK cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-15-1604DOI Listing
April 2016

Antilymphocyte Globulin for Prevention of Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease.

N Engl J Med 2016 Jan;374(1):43-53

From the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (N.K., C.W., M.H., F.A.), University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg (J.F.), University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen (W.B.), and Psy Consult, Frankfurt (A.V.) - all in Germany; Hospital Clinico Universitario, Valencia (C. Solano), Hospital Ramon y Cajal (J.P.O.) and Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda (R.D.), Madrid, Servicio de Hematología, Institut Català d'Oncologia, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, (C.F.), Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (J.S.), and Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Granada (M.J.) - all in Spain; S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna (G.B., F. Bonifazi), Hematology, DISM, University Udine, Udine (F.P.), Azienda Ospedaliera SS Antonio e Biagio e C. Arrigo, Alessandria (M. Pini), Università Federico II di Napoli, Naples (C. Selleri, A.R.), A.O. Bianchi-Melacrino-Morelli, Reggio Calabria (G. Messina), Ospedale Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza IRCCCS, San Giovanni Rotondo (A.M.C.), Azienda Ospedaliera San Carlo, Potenza (M.C.), Azienda Ospedaliera Careggi, Florence (S.G.), Ospedale Santa Croce, e Carle, Cuneo (N.M.), University of Brescia, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Brescia (D.R.), University of Pisa, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pisa (M. Petrini), Programma di Trapianto Emopoietico Metropolitano, Azienda Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, Catania (G. Milone), Policlinico G.B. Rossi, Verona (F. Benedetti), Azienda Ospedaliera, Universitaria Ospedale, Bari (D.P.), Ospedale San Gerardo, Monza (E.T.), Policlinico Modena, Modena (F.N.), and Università di Salerno, Salerno (C. Selleri) - all in Italy; Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, Israel (A.N.); and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki (T.R.).

Background: Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is the leading cause of later illness and death after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. We hypothesized that the inclusion of antihuman T-lymphocyte immune globulin (ATG) in a myeloablative conditioning regimen for patients with acute leukemia would result in a significant reduction in chronic GVHD 2 years after allogeneic peripheral-blood stem-cell transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling.

Methods: We conducted a prospective, multicenter, open-label, randomized phase 3 study of ATG as part of a conditioning regimen. A total of 168 patients were enrolled at 27 centers. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive ATG or not receive ATG, with stratification according to center and risk of disease.

Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 32.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.1 to 46.7) in the ATG group and 68.7% (95% CI, 58.4 to 80.7) in the non-ATG group (P<0.001). The rate of 2-year relapse-free survival was similar in the ATG group and the non-ATG group (59.4% [95% CI, 47.8 to 69.2] and 64.6% [95% CI, 50.9 to 75.3], respectively; P=0.21), as was the rate of overall survival (74.1% [95% CI, 62.7 to 82.5] and 77.9% [95% CI, 66.1 to 86.1], respectively; P=0.46). There were no significant between-group differences in the rates of relapse, infectious complications, acute GVHD, or adverse events. The rate of a composite end point of chronic GVHD-free and relapse-free survival at 2 years was significantly higher in the ATG group than in the non-ATG group (36.6% vs. 16.8%, P=0.005).

Conclusions: The inclusion of ATG resulted in a significantly lower rate of chronic GVHD after allogeneic transplantation than the rate without ATG. The survival rate was similar in the two groups, but the rate of a composite end point of chronic GVHD-free survival and relapse-free survival was higher with ATG. (Funded by the Neovii Biotech and the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00678275.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1506002DOI Listing
January 2016

Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for refractory Langerhans cell histiocytosis: outcome by intensity of conditioning.

Br J Haematol 2015 Jun 27;169(5):711-8. Epub 2015 Mar 27.

CIBMTR® (Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research), Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.

Patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) refractory to conventional chemotherapy have a poor outcome. There are currently two promising treatment strategies for high-risk patients: the first involves the combination of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine and cytarabine; the other approach is allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here we evaluated 87 patients with high-risk LCH who were transplanted between 1990 and 2013. Prior to the year 2000, most patients underwent HSCT following myeloablative conditioning (MAC): only 5 of 20 patients (25%) survived with a high rate (55%) of transplant-related mortality (TRM). After the year 2000 an increasing number of patients underwent HSCT with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC): 49/67 (73%) patients survived, however, the improved survival was not overtly achieved by the introduction of RIC regimens with similar 3-year probability of survival after MAC (77%) and RIC transplantation (71%). There was no significant difference in TRM by conditioning regimen intensity but relapse rates were higher after RIC compared to MAC regimens (28% vs. 8%, P = 0·02), although most patients relapsing after RIC transplantation could be salvaged with further chemotherapy. HSCT may be a curative approach in 3 out of 4 patients with high risk LCH refractory to chemotherapy: the optimal choice of HSCT conditioning remains uncertain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.13347DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4433436PMC
June 2015

Efficacy and outcome of allogeneic transplantation in IgD and nonsecretory myeloma. A report on behalf of the Myeloma Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2015 Jun 20;21(6):1054-8. Epub 2015 Feb 20.

Tumor Immunology, University Medical Center St, Radboud, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

We have recently reported on the outcome of autologous transplantation in the rare myelomas (IgD, IgE, IgM, and nonsecretory [NS]) but there is no real information on the outcome of these conditions after allogeneic transplantation. We used the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation myeloma database to compare the outcomes after allogeneic transplantation of 1354 common myelomas (IgG, IgA, and light chain myeloma) with the outcome in 26 IgD myelomas and 52 NS myelomas. There was little difference between common and the IgD and NS myeloma patients with respect to prognostic factors although the IgD group had a higher beta 2 microglobulin at diagnosis, shorter time to transplantation, and more T cell depletion. IgD and NS patients had a significantly greater achievement of complete remission at conditioning but this did not translate into equivalent progression-free survival and overall survival for the IgD patients although the NS outcome was very similar to that of common myeloma. The PFS and OS of IgD, common, and NS myelomas appear similar after allogeneic transplantation, despite a tendency for higher early relapse rate in IgD myeloma. Allogeneic transplantation may, therefore, be an option to investigate in prospective observational studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.02.012DOI Listing
June 2015

Incidence and outcome of invasive fungal diseases after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a prospective study of the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO).

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2014 Jun 14;20(6):872-80. Epub 2014 Mar 14.

Pediatrics and Pediatric Hematology Unit, Az. Osp. S.Camillo-Forlanini, Rome, Italy.

Epidemiologic investigation of invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) may be useful to identify subpopulations who might benefit from targeted treatment strategies. The Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO) prospectively registered data on 1858 consecutive patients undergoing allo-HSCT between 2008 and 2010. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for proven/probable IFD (PP-IFD) during the early (days 0 to 40), late (days 41 to 100), and very late (days 101 to 365) phases after allo-HSCT and to evaluate the impact of PP-IFDs on 1-year overall survival. The cumulative incidence of PP-IFDs was 5.1% at 40 days, 6.7% at 100 days, and 8.8% at 12 months post-transplantation. Multivariate analysis identified the following variables as associated with PP-IFDs: transplant from an unrelated volunteer donor or cord blood, active acute leukemia at the time of transplantation, and an IFD before transplantation in the early phase; transplant from an unrelated volunteer donor or cord blood and grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the late phase; and grade II-IV acute GVHD and extensive chronic GVHD in the very late phase. The risk for PP-IFD was significantly higher when acute GVHD was followed by chronic GVHD and when acute GVHD occurred in patients undergoing transplantation with grafts from other than matched related donors. The presence of PP-IFD was an independent factor in long-term survival (hazard ratio, 2.90; 95% confidence interval, 2.32 to 3.62; P < .0001). Our findings indicate that tailored prevention strategies may be useful in subpopulations at differing levels of risk for PP-IFDs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.03.004DOI Listing
June 2014

Primary prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases in allogeneic stem cell transplantation: revised recommendations from a consensus process by Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO).

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2014 Aug 26;20(8):1080-8. Epub 2014 Feb 26.

Division of Hematology, Azienda Ospedaliera Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy.

This document updates and expands the recommendations on primary prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases (IFD) in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients, published in 2009 by the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO). A consensus process was undertaken to describe and evaluate current information and practice regarding risk stratification and primary antifungal prophylaxis during the pre-engraftment and postengraftment phases after allo-HSCT. The revised recommendations were based on the evaluation of recent literature including a large, prospective, multicenter epidemiological study of allo-HSCT recipients conducted among the GITMO transplantation centers during the period of 2008 to 2010. It is intended as a guide for the identification of types and phases of transplantation at low, standard, and high risk for IFD, according to the underlying disease, transplantation, and post-transplantation factors. The risk stratification was the critical determinant of the primary antifungal approach for allo-HSCT recipients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.02.018DOI Listing
August 2014

Glutathione transferase-A2 S112T polymorphism predicts survival, transplant-related mortality, busulfan and bilirubin blood levels after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Haematologica 2014 Jan 20;99(1):172-9. Epub 2013 Sep 20.

Busulfan liver metabolism depends on glutathione, a crucial mediator of cellular and systemic stress. Here we investigated 40 polymorphisms at 27 loci involved in hepatic glutathione homeostasis, with the aim of testing their impact on the clinical outcome of 185 busulfan-conditioned allogeneic transplants. GSTA2 S112T serine allele homozygosity is an independent prognostic factor for poorer survival (RR=2.388), for increased any time- and 100-day transplant-related mortality (RR=4.912 and RR=5.185, respectively). The genotype also predicts a wider busulfan area under the concentration-time curve (1214.36 ± 570.06 vs. 838.10 ± 282.40 mMol*min) and higher post-transplant bilirubin serum levels (3.280 ± 0.422 vs. 1.874+0.197 mg/dL). In vitro, busulfan elicits pro-inflammatory activation (increased NF-KappaB activity and interleukin-8 expression) in human hepatoma cells. At the same time, the drug down-regulates a variety of genes involved in bilirubin liver clearance: constitutive androstane receptor, multidrug resistance-associated protein, solute carrier organic anion transporters, and even GSTA2. It is worthy of note that GSTA2 also acts as an intra-hepatic bilirubin binding protein. These data underline the prognostic value of GSTA2 genetic variability in busulfan-conditioned allotransplants and suggest a patho-physiological model in which busulfan-induced inflammation leads to the impairment of post-transplant bilirubin metabolism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2013.089888DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4007922PMC
January 2014

Slug/β-catenin-dependent proinflammatory phenotype in hypoxic breast cancer stem cells.

Am J Pathol 2013 Nov 12;183(5):1688-1697. Epub 2013 Sep 12.

Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, St. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy; Center for Applied Biomedical Research, St. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy. Electronic address:

Cancer stem cell survival relies on the activation of inflammatory pathways, which is speculatively triggered by cell autonomous mechanisms or by microenvironmental stimuli. Here, we observed that hypoxic bone marrow stroma-derived transforming growth factor-β 1 promotes the growth of human breast cancer stem cells as mammospheres. The ensuing Slug-dependent serine 139 phosphorylation of the DNA damage sensor H2AX in breast cancer stem cells induces tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-8 mRNAs, whose stability is enhanced by cytoplasmic β-catenin. β-Catenin also up-regulates and binds miR-221, reducing the stability of the miR-221 targets Rad51 and ERα mRNAs. Our data show that the Slug/β-catenin-dependent activation of DNA damage signaling triggered by the hypoxic microenvironment sustains the proinflammatory phenotype of breast cancer stem cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajpath.2013.07.020DOI Listing
November 2013

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation from unrelated donors in multiple myeloma: study from the Italian Bone Marrow Donor Registry.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2013 Jun 26;19(6):940-8. Epub 2013 Mar 26.

Divison of Nuclear Medicine 2, Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Torino, Italy.

To evaluate trends in allografting from unrelated donors, we conducted a study on 196 consecutive myeloma patients transplanted between 2000 and 2009 in Italy. Twenty-eight percent, 37%, and 35%, respectively, received myeloablative, reduced-intensity, and nonmyeloablative conditioning. In these 3 cohorts, 1-year and 5-year transplantation-related mortalities were 28.8% and 37.0%, 20.3% and 31.3%, and 25.0% and 30.3%, respectively (P = .745). Median overall survival (OS) and event-free survival from transplantation for the 3 cohorts were 29 and 10 months, 11 and 6 months, and 32 and 13 months, respectively (P = .039 and P = .049). Overall cumulative incidences of acute and chronic graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) were 46.1% and 51.1%. By Cox multivariate analyses, chronic GVHD was significantly associated with longer OS (hazard ratio [HR], .51; P = .009), whereas the use of peripheral blood stem cells was borderline significant (HR, .55; P = .051). Better response posttransplantation was associated with longer event-free survival (HR, 2.13 to 4.25; P < .001). Acute GVHD was associated with poorer OS (HR, 2.53; P = .001). This analysis showed a strong association of acute and chronic GVHD and depth of response posttransplantation with clinical outcomes. Long-term disease control remains challenging regardless of the conditioning. In the light of these results, prospective trials may be designed to better define the role of allografting from unrelated donors in myeloma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2013.03.012DOI Listing
June 2013

Molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL transcripts after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2013 May 17;19(5):735-40. Epub 2013 Jan 17.

Department of Hematology and Oncological Sciences Seragnoli, University of Bologna, Italy.

The monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) through low sensitivity real-time (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of BCR-ABL transcripts allows early detection of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The introduction of more sensitive techniques, such as RT quantitative (Q)-PCR, may lead to an overestimation of the risk of CML relapse. In this study, we reviewed the results of peripheral blood RT Q-PCR in CML patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT from 1983 to 2007. In our laboratory, RT Q-PCR analysis was routinely performed since 2002. Eighty-seven of 189 patients had available RT Q-PCR data; 63 patients had at least 3 RT Q-PCR analyses assessable. Fifty-two of 63 patients (83%) had, at least once, detectable transcript levels, but with an BCR-ABL/ABL ratio <.1% defined as .1% confirmed by the finding of Ph+ cells in bone marrow. No patients with persistent undetectable transcripts relapsed (P = .19). Relapse did not correlate with the number of occurrences of
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2013.01.007DOI Listing
May 2013

Hairy cell leukemia: allogeneic transplantation could be an optimal option in selected patients.

Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk 2012 Aug 24;12(4):287-9. Epub 2012 May 24.

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology L. e A. Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clml.2012.05.001DOI Listing
August 2012

SIE, SIES, GITMO updated clinical recommendations for the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

Leuk Res 2012 Apr 1;36(4):459-66. Epub 2011 Sep 1.

Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Cellulari ed Ematologia, Università degli Studi La Sapienza, Roma, Italy.

By using GRADE system we updated the guidelines for management of CLL issued in 2006 from SIE, SIES and GITMO group. We recommended fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, rituximab (FCR) in younger and selected older patients with a good fitness status, no unfavourable genetics (deletion 17p and/or p53 mutations), and a less toxic treatment in nonfit and elderly patients. In patients without unfavourable genetics, relapsed after 24 months the same initial treatment including rituximab can be considered. In patients with unfavourable genetics, refractory or relapsed within 24 months from a prior fludarabine-based treatment, allogeneic SCT or experimental treatments should be given.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2011.08.013DOI Listing
April 2012

Successful transfer of alloreactive haploidentical KIR ligand-mismatched natural killer cells after infusion in elderly high risk acute myeloid leukemia patients.

Blood 2011 Sep 25;118(12):3273-9. Epub 2011 Jul 25.

Institute of Hematology, Department of Hematology and Oncological Sciences L. and A. Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy.

Thirteen patients with acute myeloid leukemia, 5 with active disease, 2 in molecular relapse, and 6 in morphologic complete remission (CR; median age, 62 years; range, 53-73 years) received highly purified CD56(+)CD3(-) natural killer (NK) cells from haploidentical killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-ligand mismatched donors after fludarabine/cyclophosphamide immunosuppressive chemotherapy, followed by IL-2. The median number of infused NK cells was 2.74 × 10(6)/Kg. T cells were < 10(5)/Kg. No NK cell-related toxicity, including GVHD, was observed. One of the 5 patients with active disease achieved transient CR, whereas 4 of 5 patients had no clinical benefit. Both patients in molecular relapse achieved CR that lasted for 9 and 4 months, respectively. Three of 6 patients in CR are disease free after 34, 32, and 18 months. After infusion, donor NK cells were found in the peripheral blood of all evaluable patients (peak value on day 10). They were also detected in BM in some cases. Donor-versus-recipient alloreactive NK cells were shown in vivo by the detection of donor-derived NK clones that killed recipient's targets. Adoptively transferred NK cells were alloreactive against recipient's cells, including leukemia. In conclusion, infusion of purified NK cells is feasible in elderly patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as NCT00799799.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2011-01-329508DOI Listing
September 2011

Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 disparity is a significant independent risk factor for mortality after unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Blood 2009 Aug 10;114(7):1437-44. Epub 2009 Jun 10.

Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Department of Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy.

The importance of donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DPB1 matching for the clinical outcome of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is controversial. We have previously described an algorithm for nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 disparities involving HLA-DPB1*0901,*1001,*1701,*0301,*1401,*4501, based on T-cell alloreactivity patterns. By revisiting the immunogenicity of HLA-DPB1*02, a modified algorithm was developed and retrospectively tested in 621 unrelated HSCTs facilitated through the Italian Registry for oncohematologic adult patients. The modified algorithm proved to be markedly more predictive of outcome than the original one, with significantly higher Kaplan-Meier probabilities of 2-year survival in permissive compared with nonpermissive transplantations (55% vs 39%, P = .005). This was the result of increased adjusted hazards of nonrelapse mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.74; confidence interval [CI], 1.19-2.53; P = .004) but not of relapse (HR = 1.02; CI, 0.73-1.42; P = .92). The increase in the hazards of overall mortality by nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 disparity was similar in 10 of 10 (HR = 2.12; CI, 1.23-3.64; P = .006) and 9 of 10 allele-matched transplantations (HR = 2.21; CI, 1.28-3.80; P = .004), both in early-stage and in advanced-stage disease. These data call for revisiting current HLA matching strategies for unrelated HSCT, suggesting that searches should be directed up-front toward identification of HLA-DPB1 permissive, 10 of 10 or 9 of 10 matched donors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2009-01-200378DOI Listing
August 2009

Successful treatment of multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa osteomyelitis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with a combination of colistin and tigecycline.

J Med Microbiol 2007 Dec;56(Pt 12):1692-1695

Institute of Hematology and Clinical Oncology 'Lorenzo e Ariosto Serágnoli', S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy.

A case of osteomyelitis caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is reported in a patient who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The patient was successfully treated by prolonged administration of a full dose of colistin and tigecycline, and surgical curettage with the positioning of resorbable calcium sulfate pellets loaded with colistin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.47286-0DOI Listing
December 2007

Peripheral blood or bone marrow cells in reduced-intensity or myeloablative conditioning allogeneic HLA identical sibling donor transplantation for multiple myeloma.

Haematologica 2007 Nov;92(11):1513-8

Department of Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, SE 14186 Stockholm, Sweden.

Background And Objectives: Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) following reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) are being increasingly used for allogeneic transplantation in multiple myeloma. The purpose of this study was to compare outcome of patients transplanted with either PBSC or bone marrow (BM) following RIC or myeloablative conditioning (MAC).

Design And Methods: Data from 1,667 patients who had received an allogeneic identical sibling donor transplant for multiple myeloma from 1994 to 2003 were analyzed. Comparisons were made between results of PBSC and BM transplants after conditioning with RIC or MAC.

Results: The engraftment rate was faster with PBSC than with BM (median: 14 and 18 days for neutrophils and 15 and 25 days for platelets respectively) irrespectively of whether RIC or MAC was used. The incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) did not differ significantly between the groups while chronic GVHD was more prevalent in PBSC recipients irrespectively of whether they had RIC or MAC. Non-relapse mortality did not differ between PBSC and BM recipients, but was significantly higher in those treated with MAC than in those given RIC irrespectively of the cell source. The relapse/progression rate did not differ between PBSC and BM recipients, but was significantly higher in those given RIC, irrespectively of the cell source. There was no significant difference in overall or progression-free survival between patients given PBSC or BM transplants.

Interpretation And Conclusions: Although transplantation of PBSC is associated with faster engraftment and more frequent chronic GVHD, overall survival, non-relapse mortality, relapse/progression and progression-free survival are similar to those following BM transplants. However both PBSC and BM transplants are associated with lower non-relapse mortality, lower response rate and higher relapse/progression if RIC is used instead of MAC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.11353DOI Listing
November 2007

Higher numbers of blood CD14+ cells before starting conditioning regimen correlate with greater risk of acute graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic stem cell transplantation from related donors.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2007 Feb;13(2):228-34

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology L & A Seragnoli, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Host antigen-presenting cells (APCs) have been shown to induce acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) in experimental models. In this study, we investigated whether pretransplantation blood levels of host APCs, such as plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cells and monocytes, correlate with the development of aGVHD. A total of 89 consecutive patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from HLA-matched related (n = 48) or unrelated (n = 41) donors were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were analyzed by flow cytometry before initiating the conditioning regimen. In related donor transplants, patient-donor sex mismatch and monocyte levels significantly correlated with aGVHD grade II-IV in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Similar results were not observed in recipients of matched unrelated transplants, possibly due to use of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or differences in graft source in these patients. In conclusion, pretransplantation recipient monocyte levels are relevant to the development of GVHD in HSCT from related donors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2006.10.004DOI Listing
February 2007

Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia: practice guidelines from the Italian Society of Hematology, the Italian Society of Experimental Hematology and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation.

Haematologica 2006 Dec;91(12):1662-73

Divisione di Ematologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Papardo, Messina, Italy.

Objectives: The Italian Society of Hematology (SIE) and two affiliate societies (SIES and GITMO) commissioned a project to develop clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

Methods: Key questions in the management of patients with CLL were formulated by an Advisory Committee and approved by an Expert Panel of eight senior hematologists. After a systematic review of the literature, recommendations for disease-specific and supportive therapies were formulated and graded according to the supporting evidence. Explicit consensus methods were used for providing recommendations for questions with incomplete or potentially biased evidence.

Results: It is recommended that therapy is commenced in patients with CLL when at least one of the following are present: B-symptoms, progressive/obstructive lymphadenopathy or organomegaly, rapid lymphocyte doubling time, anemia or thrombocytopenia (of new onset, worsening or steroid-resistant). It is recommended that patients without co-morbidity should receive fludarabine plus cyclophosphamide, whereas elderly patients with co-morbidity should receive oral chlorambucil. Younger patients with unfavorable biological risk factors should be considered for high-dose chemotherapy and autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation within approved clinical trials. Patients either relapsing rapidly after, or non-responsive to, first-line chlorambucil should receive fludarabine-containing regimens. Patients either relapsing soon after or not responding to fludarabine-based chemotherapy should be considered for schedules including non-cross-reactive agents, such as alemtuzumab, possibly followed by high-dose chemotherapy and autologous transplantation in the context of a clinical trial or by allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Conclusions: We describe the results of a systematic literature review and an explicit approach to consensus techniques which resulted in recommendations for the key therapeutic decisions in patients with CLL.
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December 2006

Effect on survival of the development of late-onset non-infectious pulmonary complications after stem cell transplantation.

Haematologica 2006 Sep;91(9):1268-72

Division of Haematology, Transplantation Unit and Cellular Therapies Carlo Melzi, Department of Clinical and Morphological Research, University Hospital of Udine.

We evaluated the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcome of late-onset non-infectious pulmonary complications (LONIPC) in 599 patients who underwent hematopoietic allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LONIPC was 10% among the 438 patients surviving more than 3 months after HSCT. Transplants from an unrelated donor and occurrence of extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease were the variables significantly associated with the development of LONIPC. The 5-year overall survival was significantly worse among patients with LONIPC than among those without (34% vs 65%, p=0.009). Causes of death were respiratory failure and infections. The relapse rate was similar in the two groups.
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September 2006

Successful treatment of disseminated Fusariosis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with the combination of voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B.

J Infect 2006 Dec 11;53(6):e243-6. Epub 2006 Apr 11.

Institute of Hematology and Clinical Oncology Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, Italy.

Fusarium is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which is emerging as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the immunocompromised host [Fleming RV, Walsh TJ, Anaissie EJ. Emerging and less common fungal pathogens. Infect Dis Clin North Am 2002;16:915-34]. This disease can be localized, focally invasive or disseminated, when two or more noncontiguous sites are involved. Therapeutic options are scarce and mortality reaches 80-90% in patients subjected to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT) [Nucci M, Marr KA, Queiroz-Telles F, Martins CA, Trabasso P, Costa S, et al. Fusarium infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient. Clin Infect Dis 2004;1237-42]. We report a case of disseminated Fusariosis in a severe immunocompromised patient after allo-SCT that responded to treatment with the early combination of intravenous voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2006.02.011DOI Listing
December 2006

GVHD and prognostic factors.

Am J Hematol 2006 Mar;81(3):221-2

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.20491DOI Listing
March 2006

Allogeneic and syngeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with amyloid light-chain amyloidosis: a report from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Blood 2006 Mar 17;107(6):2578-84. Epub 2005 Nov 17.

University of Heidelberg, Dept of Hematology/Oncology and Rheumatology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

Using the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) registry, we retrospectively studied 19 patients with AL (amyloid light-chain) amyloidosis who underwent allogeneic (allo; n = 15) or syngeneic (syn; n = 4) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) between 1991 and 2003. For allo-SCT, full-intensity conditioning was used in 7 patients and reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) in 8 patients. Engraftment was durable in 12 of those 15 patients. The median follow-up time is 19 months. Kaplan-Meier probabilities of overall and progression-free survival were 60% and 53% at 1 year, respectively. Overall, 40% of patients died of transplant-related mortality (TRM). Best hematologic response after SCT was complete remission (CR) and partial remission (PR) in 8 and 2 patients, respectively, leading to an organ response in 8 of these patients. Seven of the 10 patients in remission are long-term survivors. In 5 of 7 evaluable patients in CR, chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) was observed, indicating the contribution of immune effects to disease control. The main clinical problem was cardiac failure in patients with poor performance status due to amyloidosis or in combination with severe infections. These data suggest that allo-SCT might be a promising and potentially curative treatment modality for selected patients with AL amyloidosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2005-06-2462DOI Listing
March 2006

Umbilical-cord blood for transplantation in adults.

N Engl J Med 2005 Mar;352(9):935-7; author reply 935-7

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March 2005

Infliximab treatment for steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease.

Haematologica 2004 Nov;89(11):1352-9

Division of Haematology, Dept. of Clinical and Morphological Research, University of Udine, Italy.

Background And Objectives: Tumor necrosis factor a is one of the principal cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). Infliximab is an antibody to this cytokine.

Design And Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis to evaluate the activity of infliximab in 32 patients with severe steroid-refractory acute GVHD. The patients received a median of 3 weekly courses of infliximab. The main organs involved in the patients were skin (n=2) liver (n=1), bowel (n=19), liver and bowel at the same stage (n=10).

Results: Nineteen out 32 patients (59%) responded to infliximab with 6 (19%) complete and 13 (40%) partial responses. Age younger than 35 years, intestinal involvement and a longer time between hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and infliximab administration were factors predicting a favorable response. Infective episodes developed in 23/32 (72%) patients. All the 13 unresponsive patients died of GVHD shortly after infliximab. Thirteen of 19 responsive patients were alive at a median follow-up of 449 days (range 155-842) after infliximab, with no signs of chronic GVHD (n=5), limited (n=5) or extensive involvement (n=3). Six patients who responded subsequently died, one of chronic lung GVHD, the others of vascular complications or infections (2 fungal diseases).

Interpretation And Conclusions: We conclude that infliximab is active in the treatment of severe steroid-refractory acute GVHD, particularly when the intestine is involved. Infections commonly followed its administration. The clinical activity of infliximab and the possibility that it increases the risk of infections are worth investigating in prospective trials.
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November 2004

High-dose therapy with autologous transplantation for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: the Bologna experience.

Leuk Lymphoma 2004 Feb;45(2):321-6

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology L. e A. Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, Italy.

Patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) who relapse after initial therapy have a poor prognosis and with standard dose salvage therapy the outlook remains poor. In this work we examine the patient characteristics and outcome of patients with aggressive NHL treated with HDT and autologous transplantation at our Institute from 1982 to 1999. A retrospective analysis was performed examining patient characteristics, prior chemotherapy regimens, pretransplant disease status, HDT regimen, source of stem cells, time for hematopietic recovery, complications of transplantation, response rates, overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS). One hundred and thirty-four patients with aggressive NHL were treated with estimated 10-year OS and RFS rates of 50% and 66%, respectively. Disease status (sensitive vs. refractory) pre-HDT was the most powerful predictive parameter for OS and RFS, at both univariate and multivariate analysis. For the entire cohort, transplant-related mortality was only 3.5% without evidence of second malignancies. Our results confirm that HDT with autologous transplantation is associated with a durable RFS in a remarkable proportion of aggressive NHL patients with very low global early and late toxicity. Improved patient selection, transplant timing, ongoing improvements in supportive care, and selected phase III trials should increase outcomes further.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428190310001597900DOI Listing
February 2004

Acute graft-versus-host disease and steroid treatment impair CD11c+ and CD123+ dendritic cell reconstitution after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2004 Feb;10(2):106-15

Research Center for Transplant Immunology, Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, Italy.

Human dendritic cells (DC) comprise 2 subsets-plasmacytoid CD123(+) and myeloid CD11c(+) DC-that may have distinct roles in the regulation of immunity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In this study, we analyzed the kinetics of CD123(+) DC and CD11c(+) DC reconstitution in 31 patients who underwent transplantation with allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood (PB) stem cells from HLA-identical sibling donors after myeloablative conditioning. Lineage marker-negative HLA-DR(+) CD11c(+) CD11c(+) DC and lineage marker-negative HLA-DR(+) CD123(+) CD123(+) DC, as well as monocytes and lymphoid subsets, were enumerated in donor grafts and in the PB of patients at various time points after transplantation. Reconstitution of both CD11c(+) DC and CD123(+) DC to normal levels occurred within 6 to 12 months and was not affected by the diagnosis, preparatory regimen, or graft composition. However, PB CD11c(+) DC and CD123(+) DC counts were significantly reduced in patients with acute GVHD grade II to IV (at 1 and 3 months) and grade I (at 1 month). Patients with chronic GVHD instead showed reduced CD123(+) DC counts only 6 months after transplantation. Moreover, treatment with steroids (>0.1 mg/kg) was significantly associated with reduced PB CD11c(+) DC and CD123(+) DC counts at all time points after transplantation. In multivariate analysis, only acute GVHD affected DC reconstitution early after transplantation. These results will prompt new studies addressing whether DC reconstitution correlates with immunity against infectious agents or with graft-versus-tumor reactions after PB stem cell allotransplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2003.09.005DOI Listing
February 2004

Hematopoietic mixed chimerism after allogenic BMT.

Transfusion 2003 Dec;43(12):1758-9

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0041-1132.2003.00580.xDOI Listing
December 2003