Publications by authors named "Giulia Di Pierro"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Serum Metabolomics Classifier Derived from Elderly Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Predicts Relapse in the Adjuvant Setting.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Jun 2;13(11). Epub 2021 Jun 2.

Department of Medical Oncology, New Hospital of Prato S. Stefano, 59100 Prato, Italy.

Adjuvant treatment for patients with early stage colorectal cancer (eCRC) is currently based on suboptimal risk stratification, especially for elderly patients. Metabolomics may improve the identification of patients with residual micrometastases after surgery. In this retrospective study, we hypothesized that metabolomic fingerprinting could improve risk stratification in patients with eCRC. Serum samples obtained after surgery from 94 elderly patients with eCRC (65 relapse free and 29 relapsed, after 5-years median follow up), and from 75 elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) obtained before a new line of chemotherapy, were retrospectively analyzed via proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The prognostic role of metabolomics in patients with eCRC was assessed using Kaplan-Meier curves. PCA-CA-kNN could discriminate the metabolomic fingerprint of patients with relapse-free eCRC and mCRC (70.0% accuracy using NOESY spectra). This model was used to classify the samples of patients with relapsed eCRC: 69% of eCRC patients with relapse were predicted as metastatic. The metabolomic classification was strongly associated with prognosis (-value 0.0005, HR 3.64), independently of tumor stage. In conclusion, metabolomics could be an innovative tool to refine risk stratification in elderly patients with eCRC. Based on these results, a prospective trial aimed at improving risk stratification by metabolomic fingerprinting (LIBIMET) is ongoing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13112762DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8199587PMC
June 2021

Short and mid-term outcomes of multimodal treatment for locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer in elderly patients.

Gen Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2020 Nov 17;68(11):1290-1297. Epub 2020 May 17.

Thoracic Surgery Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Largo Brambilla, 1, 50134, Florence, Italy.

Objective: Multimodality treatments are effective for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) showing benefits in overall (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), but these options are frequently denied to elderly patients.

Methods: The objectives of this retrospective study were: to investigate mortality, morbidity and oncological outcomes of pulmonary resection after induction therapy (IT) for NSCLC in elderly patients. We divided the cohort into two: patients < 70 years (group A) and patients ≥70 years (group B). A multivariable logistic regression was built to identify factors associated with morbidity.

Results: 77 patients underwent pulmonary resection after IT, 27 were aged ≥70 years. Type of chemotherapy, surgical procedures, pathological stages were comparable between the two groups, while the preoperative use of chemo-radiation therapy regimen was more frequent in group A (p = 0.027). In-hospital mortality was similar, while the percentage of patients with complications (38% vs 48.1%, p = 0.47) and the complication rate (50% vs 77%, p = 0.01) were higher in group B, but the severity of complications was comparable. The multivariable analysis did not identify any risk factors associated with morbidity. OS at 3 years and DFS at 2 years were not different (61% vs 48.5%, p = 0.64; 61.7% vs 44%, p = 0.393).

Conclusions: Lung resection for LA-NSCLC after IT can be performed safely in selected elderly patients with favourable postoperative and mid-term oncological results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11748-020-01384-5DOI Listing
November 2020

An overview of the clinical use of cabozantinib in the treatment of advanced non-clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (NCCRCC).

Crit Rev Oncol Hematol 2020 May 3;149:102921. Epub 2020 Mar 3.

Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini, 6, 50139, Florence, Italy.

Patients diagnosed with non-clear renal cell carcinoma have often been excluded from clinical trials due to the shortage of treatments available, the low incidence of tumours with non-clear histology, and the corresponding diversity of intrinsic molecular features. This approach led to a knowledge gap in finding the optimal treatment for patients diagnosed with non-clear cell renal carcinoma. Cabozantinib, a potent multiple tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, has been recently investigated in patients with non-clear cell histologies of renal cell cancer. In this review, we have summarized available data on the use of cabozantinib in non-clear renal cell carcinoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.critrevonc.2020.102921DOI Listing
May 2020

Cabozantinib in advanced non-clear-cell renal cell carcinoma: is it the way clearer now?

Ann Transl Med 2019 Sep;7(Suppl 6):S229

Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/atm.2019.07.70DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6789360PMC
September 2019

Prognostic and diagnostic value of [18F]FDG-PET/CT in restaging patients with small cell lung carcinoma: an Italian multicenter study.

Nucl Med Commun 2019 Aug;40(8):808-814

Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University Tor Vergata, Rome.

Background: The presence of residual disease after initial treatment in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) influences prognosis and impacts patient management. To date, few data exist on the value of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ([F]FDG)-PET/computed tomography (CT) in SCLC at restaging. Therefore, in restaging patients with SCLC, we aimed to (a) evaluate the prognostic value yielded by [F]FDG-PET/CT and (b) assess the diagnostic agreement between [F]FDG-PET/CT and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT).

Patients And Methods: From a multicenter database, we evaluated 164 patients with SCLC who underwent [F]FDG-PET/CT for restaging purposes. PET scans were evaluated visually to identify the presence of recurrence. For each patient, the maximum and the mean standardized uptake value (SUVmax and SUVmean, respectively), metabolic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis were calculated, taking into account the lesion with the highest [F]FDG uptake (namely, the index lesion) in the local recurrences, lymph node involvement, and distant metastasis categories. Kaplan-Meier curves were computed to assess the effects of [F]FDG-PET/CT findings on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival. Furthermore, the agreement between PET/CT and ceCT in detecting metastases was evaluated in 119 patients on a patient-based analysis (Cohen's κ; P < 0.05).

Results: The presence of metastatic lesions at [F]FDG-PET/CT was associated with a significantly shorter OS (P = 0.039) and progression-free survival (P < 0.001). Higher SUVmax showed a trend toward a shorter OS (P = 0.065). The K-agreement between ceCT and PET/CT in recurrent SCLC was 0.37 (P < 0.001). PET/CT and ceCT showed the same number of lesions in 52 (43.7%) patients, whereas PET/CT detected additional lesions in 35 (29.4%) patients.

Conclusion: Detection of metastatic lesions at restaging by [F]FDG-PET/CT can predict a higher rate of progression and negatively influence OS in patients with SCLC. [F]FDG-PET/CT and ceCT seem to be complementary imaging modalities in patients with metastatic SCLC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MNM.0000000000001038DOI Listing
August 2019
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