Publications by authors named "Giulia Cormo"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Online prevention programmes for university students: stakeholder perspectives from six European countries.

Eur J Public Health 2021 07;31(31 Suppl 1):i64-i70

King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK.

Background: Students beginning university are at a heightened risk for developing mental health disorders. Online prevention and early intervention programmes targeting mental health have the potential to reduce this risk, however, previous research has shown uptake to be rather poor. Understanding university stakeholders' (e.g. governing level and delivery staff [DS] and students) views and attitudes towards such online prevention programmes could help with their development, implementation and dissemination within university settings.

Methods: Semi-structured interviews, focus groups and online surveys were completed with staff at a governing level, university students and DS (i.e. student health or teaching staff) from six European countries. They were asked about their experiences with, and needs and attitudes towards, online prevention programmes, as well as the factors that influence the translation of these programmes into real-world settings. Results were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Results: Participating stakeholders knew little about online prevention programmes for university settings; however, they viewed them as acceptable. The main themes to emerge were the basic conditions and content of the programmes, the awareness and engagement, the resources needed, the usability and the responsibility and ongoing efforts to increase reach.

Conclusions: Overall, although these stakeholders had little knowledge about online prevention programmes, they were open to the idea of introducing them. They could see the potential benefits that these programmes might bring to a university setting as a whole and the individual students and staff members.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckab040DOI Listing
July 2021

An Internet based intervention for improving resilience and coping strategies in university students: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Internet Interv 2019 Apr 22;16:43-51. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

University Jaume, Castellón, Spain.

Background: The literature shows a high prevalence of depression and anxiety in young people. The university represents a change in the lives of students, and is considered a stress factor. Therefore, it is particularly relevant to develop interventions specifically addressed to students and foster supportive environments and resilient communities. As students are "digital natives", online interventions offer several potential advantages in doing this. This study aims to develop and evaluate the efficacy of an Internet-based intervention (CORE: Cultivating our Resilience), based on the Ryff model of well-being, to promote resilience and coping skills, decrease symptoms of depression and anxiety, and increase overall wellbeing in young people confronting a crucial life event (the university). This paper summarizes the study protocol.

Method: The design of the planned study is a randomized controlled trial. A minimum of 464 participants will be randomly assigned to two conditions: 1) an unguided Internet-based intervention to enhance resilience (N = 232); 2) a care-as-usual condition (CAU) (N = 232). The primary outcome will be the Connor-Davidson resilience scale. Secondary outcomes will - among others - include other relevant clinical measures, such as anxiety and depressive symptoms, quality of life, and social support. Outcomes will be assessed 4 and 8 weeks, and 6 and 12-months follow-ups. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses will be performed.

Discussion: The results of this study will contribute to the growing research on Internet-delivered interventions. The expected results may have a major impact on the prevention of mental disorders and possible negative consequences in at-risk populations, such as college students.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2018.03.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364440PMC
April 2019
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