Publications by authors named "Giovanni Pagni"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Lifetime evolution of ADHD treatment.

J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2021 Jul 15;128(7):1085-1098. Epub 2021 May 15.

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Section of Psychiatry, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), has been traditionally considered a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting children and adolescents characterized by inattention, hyperactivity, disruptive behavior, and impulsivity. Although still debated, it is evident that ADHD is also present in adulthood, but this diagnosis is rarely carried out, mainly for the frequent comorbidity with other psychiatric and/or substance abuse disorders. Given the need to shed more light on the pharmacological treatment of ADHD, we performed a naturalistic review to review and comment on the available literature of ADHD treatment across the lifespan. Indeed, stimulants are endowed of a prompt efficacy and safety, whilst non-stimulants, although requiring some weeks to be fully effective, are useful when a substance abuse history is detected. In any case, the pharmacological management of ADHD appears to be still largely influenced by the individual experience of the clinicians. Further longitudinal studies with a careful and detailed characterization of participants across different phases of the lifespan are also required to provide relevant confirmations (or denials) regarding pharmacological treatments amongst the different age groups.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00702-021-02336-wDOI Listing
July 2021

Protracted Hiccups Induced by Aripiprazole and Regressed after Administration of Gabapentin.

Case Rep Psychiatry 2021 22;2021:5567152. Epub 2021 Apr 22.

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Roma 57, 56100 Pisa, Italy.

Hiccups are sudden, repeated, and involuntary contractions of the diaphragm muscle (myoclonic contraction). It involves a reflex arc that, once activated, causes a strong contraction of the diaphragm immediately followed by the closure of the glottis translating into the classic "hic" sound. Hiccups can be short, persistent, and intractable depending on the duration. The most disabling hiccups often represent the epiphenomenon of a medical condition such as gastrointestinal and cardiovascular disorders; central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities; ear, nose, and throat (ENT) conditions or pneumological problems; metabolic/endocrine disorders; infections; and psychogenic disorders. Some drugs, such as aripiprazole, a second-generation antipsychotic, can induce the onset of variable hiccups. We describe herein the cases of three hospitalized patients who developed insistent hiccups after taking aripiprazole and who positively responded to low doses of gabapentin. It is probable that aripiprazole, prescribed at a low dosage (<7.5 mg/day), would act as a dopamine agonist by stimulating D and D receptors at the "hiccup center" level-located in the brain stem-thus triggering the hiccup. On the other hand, gabapentin led to a complete regression of the hiccup probably by reducing the nerve impulse transmission and modulating the diaphragmatic activity. The present case series suggests the use of low doses of gabapentin as an effective treatment for aripiprazole-induced hiccups. However, our knowledge of the neurotransmitter functioning of the hiccup reflex arc is still limited, and further research is needed to characterize the neurotransmitters involved in hiccups for potential novel therapeutic targets.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/5567152DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8084681PMC
April 2021

Is there a relationship between morphological and functional platelet changes and depressive disorder?

CNS Spectr 2020 Oct 23:1-34. Epub 2020 Oct 23.

Geriatric Psychiatry Department, Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, New York, USA.

Background: Blood platelets, due to shared biochemical and functional properties with presynaptic serotonergic neurons, constituted, over the years, an attractive peripheral biomarker of neuronal activity. Therefore, the literature strongly focused on the investigation of eventual structural and functional platelet abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly in depressive disorder. Given their impact in biological psychiatry, the goal of the present paper was to review and critically analyze studies exploring platelet activity, functionality, and morpho-structure in subjects with depressive disorder.

Methods: According to the PRISMA guidelines, we performed a systematic review through the PubMed database up to March 2020 with the search terms: (1) platelets in depression [Title/Abstract]"; (2) "(platelets[Title]) AND depressive disorder[Title/Abstract]"; (3) "(Platelet[Title]) AND major depressive disorder[Title]"; (4) (platelets[Title]) AND depressed[Title]"; (5) (platelets[Title]) AND depressive episode[Title]"; (6) (platelets[Title]) AND major depression[Title]"; (7) platelet activation in depression[All fields]"; and (8) platelet reactivity in depression[All fields]."

Results: After a detailed screening analysis and the application of specific selection criteria, we included in our review a total of 106 for qualitative synthesis. The studies were classified into various subparagraphs according to platelet characteristics analyzed: serotonergic system (5-HT2A receptors, SERT activity, and 5-HT content), adrenergic system, MAO activity, biomarkers of activation, responsivity, morphological changes, and other molecular pathways.

Conclusions: Despite the large amount of the literature examined, nonunivocal and, occasionally, conflicting results emerged. However, the findings on structural and metabolic alterations, modifications in the expression of specific proteins, changes in the aggregability, or in the responsivity to different pro-activating stimuli, may be suggestive of potential platelet dysfunctions in depressed subjects, which would result in a kind of hyperreactive state. This condition could potentially lead to an increased cardiovascular risk. In line with this hypothesis, we speculated that antidepressant treatments would seem to reduce this hyperreactivity while representing a potential tool for reducing cardiovascular risk in depressed patients and, maybe, in other neuropsychiatric conditions. However, the problem of the specificity of platelet biomarkers is still at issue and would deserve to be deepened in future studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1092852920001959DOI Listing
October 2020

Misperceptions and hallucinatory experiences in ultra-trailer, high-altitude runners.

Riv Psichiatr 2020 May-Jun;55(3):183-190

2nd Psychiatric Unit, Santa Chiara University Hospital, University of Pisa, Italy - Association for the Application of Neuroscientific Knowledge to Social Aims (AU-CNS), Pietrasanta, Lucca, Italy - G. De Lisio Institute of Behavioural Sciences, Pisa, Italy.

Background: The Mountain Activities Neuro-behavioural Research Programme is a research project born in the 2 nd Unit of Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at the University of Pisa to investigate the effects of altitude on the mental and neuro-behavioural aspects of people performing activities in mountainous areas.

Methods: In this study, after elaborating a standardised data collection form, based on traditional psychopathology notions, to classify the misperceptions reported by the athletes taking part, we investigated the various types of these misperceptions in 21 athletes (including only one female), with a mean age of 44.90 ± 8.51 (min 33 and max 58).

Results: The athletes reported different kinds of misperceptions. It was possible to highlight three different clusters of athletes, based on the similarities between the kinds of misperceptions reported in each cluster: (a) anomalies in the intrinsic characteristics of perceptions (i.e. depersonalisation and derealisation), (b) illusions and (c) hallucinations.

Conclusions: This study supports the concept that anomalous perceptual experiences may occur independently of the context of psychiatric or neurological disorders. The chance of observing hallucinatory phenomena outside the context of psychiatric disorders and in extreme environmental conditions among ultra-trail runners may offer a unique opportunity to those intending to study psychopathological conditions in a 'para-physiological' context.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1708/3382.33575DOI Listing
June 2021

Arnold-Chiari Malformation in a Patient with Bipolar I and Panic Disorders.

Psychiatr Danub 2020 ;32(1):137-138

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Psychiatry, University of Pisa, Via Roma 57, 56100, Pisa, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2021

Potentially traumatic events, post-traumatic stress disorder and post-traumatic stress spectrum in patients with fibromyalgia.

Clin Exp Rheumatol 2019 Jan-Feb;37 Suppl 116(1):39-43. Epub 2018 Apr 24.

Psychiatric Clinic, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy.

Objectives: Fibromyalgia (FM) is defined as a severe, chronic, non-articular rheumatic condition characterised by widespread musculoskeletal pain, hyperalgesia and generalised tender points, in the absence of inflammatory or structural musculoskeletal abnormalities. Pain is the predominant symptom, allodynia and hyperalgesia are common signs. Extreme fatigue, impaired cognition and non-restorative sleeping difficulties coexist in addition to other somatic symptoms. Several studies suggest there is a meaningful relationship between FM and the psychological symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a mental disorder that can develop after a person has been exposed to a traumatic event, characterised by a specific set of symptoms including re-experiencing of the event, avoidance and numbing and arousal. The present study investigates the impact of lifetime potentially traumatic events, including losses, and of post-traumatic stress symptoms on the severity of illness in patients with fibromyalgia (FM).

Methods: Sixty-one patients with FM, diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria, were consecutively enrolled at the Unit of Rheumatology, University of Pisa, Italy. Assessments included: the SCID-5 and the Trauma and Loss Spectrum Self-Report (TALS-SR) lifetime version.

Results: 21.3% of the subjects (n=13) met the criteria for "partial" PTSD: 57.4% criterion B, 42.6% criterion C, 31.1 criterion D and 44.3% criterion E. Fibromyalgia patients without PTSD reported significantly lower scores in all domains compared to the patients with partial PTSD, the latter ones reporting significantly lower scores in all domains compared to full PTSD with the exception of domain I. In particular, these differences were noticeable in Domain VI and Domain VIII.

Conclusions: The results of the study show that fibromyalgic patients with PTSD report more potentially traumatic events, avoidance symptoms, numbing, arousal, maladaptive coping and personality characteristics compared to patients with partial or without PTSD; these results could indicate that loss and/or trauma events represent a risk factor for the development of symptoms of FM in genetically predisposed individuals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2019