Publications by authors named "Giovanni Francesco Fasciglione"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of Extracellular Osteoanabolic Agents on the Endogenous Response of Osteoblastic Cells.

Cells 2021 09 10;10(9). Epub 2021 Sep 10.

Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", 00133 Rome, Italy.

The complex multidimensional skeletal organization can adapt its structure in accordance with external contexts, demonstrating excellent self-renewal capacity. Thus, optimal extracellular environmental properties are critical for bone regeneration and inextricably linked to the mechanical and biological states of bone. It is interesting to note that the microstructure of bone depends not only on genetic determinants (which control the bone remodeling loop through autocrine and paracrine signals) but also, more importantly, on the continuous response of cells to external mechanical cues. In particular, bone cells sense mechanical signals such as shear, tensile, loading and vibration, and once activated, they react by regulating bone anabolism. Although several specific surrounding conditions needed for osteoblast cells to specifically augment bone formation have been empirically discovered, most of the underlying biomechanical cellular processes underneath remain largely unknown. Nevertheless, exogenous stimuli of endogenous osteogenesis can be applied to promote the mineral apposition rate, bone formation, bone mass and bone strength, as well as expediting fracture repair and bone regeneration. The following review summarizes the latest studies related to the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells, enhanced by mechanical forces or supplemental signaling factors (such as trace metals, nutraceuticals, vitamins and exosomes), providing a thorough overview of the exogenous osteogenic agents which can be exploited to modulate and influence the mechanically induced anabolism of bone. Furthermore, this review aims to discuss the emerging role of extracellular stimuli in skeletal metabolism as well as their potential roles and provide new perspectives for the treatment of bone disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cells10092383DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8471159PMC
September 2021

Role of proteolytic enzymes in the COVID-19 infection and promising therapeutic approaches.

Biochem Pharmacol 2020 12 19;182:114225. Epub 2020 Sep 19.

Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Roma, Italy. Electronic address:

In the Fall of 2019 a sudden and dramatic outbreak of a pulmonary disease (Coronavirus Disease COVID-19), due to a new Coronavirus strain (i.e., SARS-CoV-2), emerged in the continental Chinese area of Wuhan and quickly diffused throughout the world, causing up to now several hundreds of thousand deaths. As for common viral infections, the crucial event for the viral life cycle is the entry of genetic material inside the host cell, realized by the spike protein of the virus through its binding to host receptors and its activation by host proteases; this is followed by translation of the viral RNA into a polyprotein, exploiting the host cell machinery. The production of individual mature viral proteins is pivotal for replication and release of new virions. Several proteolytic enzymes either of the host and of the virus act in a concerted fashion to regulate and coordinate specific steps of the viral replication and assembly, such as (i) the entry of the virus, (ii) the maturation of the polyprotein and (iii) the assembly of the secreted virions for further diffusion. Therefore, proteases involved in these three steps are important targets, envisaging that molecules which interfere with their activity are promising therapeutic compounds. In this review, we will survey what is known up to now on the role of specific proteolytic enzymes in these three steps and of most promising compounds designed to impair this vicious cycle.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bcp.2020.114225DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7501082PMC
December 2020

Gelatinolytic activity in gingival crevicular fluid and saliva of growing patients with Marfan syndrome: a case-control study.

BMC Oral Health 2019 07 24;19(1):161. Epub 2019 Jul 24.

Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome, Tor Vergata Via Montpellier 1, 00133, Rome, Italy.

Background: Aim of the study was to evaluate the gelatinolytic activity in the saliva and gingival crevicular fluid from a sample group of subjects with Marfan syndrome.

Methods: Two groups were analyzed in this case-control study. A group of 28 subjects with Marfan syndrome (MG) was recruited from the Centre for Rare Disease, Marfan Clinic of Tor Vergata University Hospital. The second sample, 23 subjects, with the same characteristics and without any syndrome, was the control group (CG). Saliva and gingival crevicular fluid were collected and transferred to a sterile test tube and stored frozen at - 20 °C until analysis at the Medical Chemistry Laboratory. Gelatin substrate zymography was used for the evaluation and characterization of saliva and crevicular fluid proteinases. Correlation test and Student's t-test have been used to analyze data.

Results: In all samples different gelatin-degrading activities were observed. Two bands, which are related to the molecular weights of pro-MMP-9 and active MMP-9, respectively, were detectable in 100% of Marfan and control samples. MMP-2 activity was higher in Marfan group. Additional bands (55/48 kDa), corresponding to the activated forms of collagenase (MMP-13), were observed in saliva samples of both groups.

Conclusions: The association of an enhanced activity by MMP-13 with an increased amount of active MMP-9 might be an important biomarker for the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12903-019-0854-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6657031PMC
July 2019

The enzymatic processing of α-dystroglycan by MMP-2 is controlled by two anchoring sites distinct from the active site.

PLoS One 2018 15;13(2):e0192651. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

CNR Institute for Molecular Recognition, Roma Italy.

Dystroglycan (DG) is a membrane receptor, belonging to the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) and formed by two subunits, α-dystroglycan (α-DG) and β-dystroglycan (β -DG). The C-terminal domain of α-DG and the N-terminal extracellular domain of β -DG are connected, providing a link between the extracellular matrix and the cytosol. Under pathological conditions, such as cancer and muscular dystrophies, DG may be the target of metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, contributing to disease progression. Previously, we reported that the C-terminal domain α-DG (483-628) domain is particularly susceptible to the catalytic activity of MMP-2; here we show that the α-DG 621-628 region is required to carry out its complete digestion, suggesting that this portion may represent a MMP-2 anchoring site. Following this observation, we synthesized an α-DG based-peptide, spanning the (613-651) C-terminal region. The analysis of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the whole and the isolated catalytic domain of MMP-2 (cdMMP-2) has shown its inhibitory properties, indicating the presence of (at least) two binding sites for the peptide, both located within the catalytic domain, only one of the two being topologically distinct from the catalytic active groove. However, the different behavior between whole MMP-2 and cdMMP-2 envisages the occurrence of an additional binding site for the peptide on the hemopexin-like domain of MMP-2. Interestingly, mass spectrometry analysis has shown that α-DG (613-651) peptide is cleavable even though it is a very poor substrate of MMP-2, a feature that renders this molecule a promising template for developing a selective MMP-2 inhibitor.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0192651PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5813964PMC
April 2018

Membrane Cholesterol Modulates LOX-1 Shedding in Endothelial Cells.

PLoS One 2015 23;10(10):e0141270. Epub 2015 Oct 23.

Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Via Montpellier 1, 00133, Rome, Italy.

The lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a scavenger receptor responsible for ox-LDL recognition, binding and internalization, which is up-regulated during atherogenesis. Its activation triggers endothelium dysfunction and induces inflammation. A soluble form of LOX-1 has been identified in the human blood and its presence considered a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. We recently showed that cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit ox-LDL binding and internalization, rescuing the ox-LDL induced apoptotic phenotype in primary endothelial cells. Here we have investigated the molecular bases of human LOX-1 shedding by metalloproteinases and the role of cell membrane cholesterol on the regulation of this event by modulating its level with MβCD and statins. We report that membrane cholesterol affects the release of different forms of LOX-1 in cells transiently and stably expressing human LOX-1 and in a human endothelial cell line (EA.hy926). In particular, our data show that i) cholesterol depletion triggers the release of LOX-1 in exosomes as a full-length transmembrane isoform and as a truncated ectodomain soluble fragment (sLOX-1); ii) endothelial cells secrete a soluble metalloproteinase which induces LOX-1 ectodomain shedding and iii) long term statins treatment enhances sLOX-1 proteolytic shedding.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0141270PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4619672PMC
June 2016

Role of metalloproteinases in tendon pathophysiology.

Mini Rev Med Chem 2014 ;14(12):978-87

Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, I-00133 Roma, Italy.

Tendons play a crucial role in musculoskeletal functioning because they physically connect bones and muscles making the movement of articular joints possible. The molecular composition of tendons mostly include collagen I fibrils, which aggregate together to form fibers to form a fascicle. A complex network composed of resident cells (i.e., tenocytes) and extracellular matrix macromolecules (glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans, glycoproteins and other non collagenous proteins) interact and define the structure of tendons and their properties. Development, renewal and remodeling of tendons composition occur at all ages of living organisms so the homeostasis of proteolytic systems is a critical issue. A major role is played by Metalloproteinases, a family of Zn(2+)-dependent endopeptidases involved in the catabolism of several components of the extracellular matrix, such as collagens, proteoglycans, fibronectin and many others. Among these, two main classes are mostly involved in tendon pathophysiology, namely the Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and a Disintegrin-like and Metalloproteinase domain with Thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTSs). This study analyses the various aspects of the roles played by Metalloproteinases in the physiological and pathological processes of tendons.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1389557514666141106132411DOI Listing
July 2015

The collagenolytic action of MMP-1 is regulated by the interaction between the catalytic domain and the hinge region.

J Biol Inorg Chem 2012 Apr 10;17(4):663-72. Epub 2012 Mar 10.

Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome, Italy.

The role of the hinge region in the unwinding and cleavage of type I collagen by interstitial collagenase (MMP-1) has been studied at 37 °C and pH 7.3. The collagenolytic processing by MMP-1 displays a very similar overall rate for both chains of collagen I, even though the affinity is higher for the α-1 chain and the cleavage rate is faster for the α-2 chain. MMP-1 binding to collagen I brings about a significant unwinding of the triple-helical arrangement only after the first cleavage step of the α-1 and α-2 chains. The proteolytic processing by wild-type MMP-1 on a synthetic substrate and collagen I has been compared with that observed for site-directed mutants obtained either by truncating the hinge region (∆255-272) or by individually replacing the conserved amino acids Val268, Gly272, and Lys277 of the hinge region with residues observed for the corresponding position in stromelysin-1 (MMP-3), a noncollagenolytic metalloproteinase. The ∆256-272 mutant has no collagenolytic activity, clearly demonstrating the crucial role of this region for the enzymatic processing of collagen I. However, among various mutants investigated, only Gly272Asp shows a dramatically reduced enzymatic activity both on the synthetic substrate and on collagen I. This effect, however, is clearly related to the substituting residue, since substitution of Ala or Asn for Gly272 does not have any effect on the kinetic properties of MMP-1. These data suggest that the substrate specificity of MMP-1 is dictated by the reciprocal structural relationships between the catalytic domain and the carboxy-terminal domain through the conformational arrangement of the hinge region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00775-012-0886-zDOI Listing
April 2012

Human matrix metalloproteinases: an ubiquitarian class of enzymes involved in several pathological processes.

Mol Aspects Med 2012 Apr 10;33(2):119-208. Epub 2011 Nov 10.

Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Roma, Italy.

Human matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) belong to the M10 family of the MA clan of endopeptidases. They are ubiquitarian enzymes, structurally characterized by an active site where a Zn(2+) atom, coordinated by three histidines, plays the catalytic role, assisted by a glutamic acid as a general base. Various MMPs display different domain composition, which is very important for macromolecular substrates recognition. Substrate specificity is very different among MMPs, being often associated to their cellular compartmentalization and/or cellular type where they are expressed. An extensive review of the different MMPs structural and functional features is integrated with their pathological role in several types of diseases, spanning from cancer to cardiovascular diseases and to neurodegeneration. It emerges a very complex and crucial role played by these enzymes in many physiological and pathological processes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mam.2011.10.015DOI Listing
April 2012

pH dependence of the enzymatic processing of collagen I by MMP-1 (fibroblast collagenase), MMP-2 (gelatinase A), and MMP-14 ectodomain.

J Biol Inorg Chem 2010 Nov 12;15(8):1219-32. Epub 2010 Jun 12.

Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133, Rome, Italy.

The proteolytic processing of collagen I by three matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a collagenase (MMP-1), a gelatinase (MMP-2), and the ectodomain of a membrane-type metalloproteinase (MMP-14), has been investigated at 37 °C between pH 6.0 and 9.2, a pH range reflecting conditions found in different body compartments under various physiopathological processes. In the proteolytic degradation the native collagen triple helix must be partially unwound to allow the binding of α chains to the protease's active-site cleft. We have found that MMP-1 interacts with the two types of collagen I α chains in a similar fashion, whereas both MMP-2 and MMP-14 bind the two α chains in a different way. The overall enzymatic activity is higher on the α-2 chain for both MMP-1 and MMP-2, whereas the MMP-14 ectodomain preferentially cleaves the α-1 chain. In MMP-2 a marked difference for substrate affinity (higher for the α-1 chain) is overwhelmed by an even more marked propensity to cleave the α-2 chain. As a whole, the three classes of MMPs investigated appear to process collagen I in a significantly different fashion, so various MMPs play different roles in the collagen homeostasis in various compartments (such as bloodstream, synovial fluid, normal and tumoral tissues), where different pH values are observed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00775-010-0680-8DOI Listing
November 2010

Structural bases for substrate and inhibitor recognition by matrix metalloproteinases.

Curr Med Chem 2008 ;15(22):2192-222

Colosseum Combinatorial Chemistry Centre for Technology (C4T S.C.a r.l.), Via della Ricerca Scientifica s.n.c, I-00133 Roma, Italy.

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases which are involved in the proteolytic processing of several components of the extracellular matrix. As a consequence, MMPs are implicated in several physiological and pathological processes, like skeletal growth and remodelling, wound healing, cancer, arthritis, and multiple sclerosis, raising a very widespread interest toward this class of enzymes as potential therapeutic targets. Here, structure-function relationships are discussed to highlight the role of different MMP domains on substrate/inhibitor recognition and processing and to attempt the formulation of advanced guidelines, based on natural substrates, for the design of inhibitors more efficient in vivo.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/092986708785747490DOI Listing
October 2008

Kinetic investigation of porphyrin interaction with chiral templates reveals unexpected features of the induction and self-propagation mechanism of chiral memory.

J Am Chem Soc 2008 Aug 18;130(32):10476-7. Epub 2008 Jul 18.

Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, CNR, Sezione di Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania, Italy.

Kinetics of the porphyrin aggregation leading to a chiral memory system shows a remarkable "catalytic" effect of the noncovalent templates explaining their self-replication ability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja803426qDOI Listing
August 2008

Characterization of the mechanisms by which gelatinase A, neutrophil collagenase, and membrane-type metalloproteinase MMP-14 recognize collagen I and enzymatically process the two alpha-chains.

J Mol Biol 2007 May 2;368(4):1101-13. Epub 2007 Mar 2.

Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, I-00133 Rome, Italy.

The turnover of native collagen has been ascribed to different members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family. Here, the mechanisms by which neutrophil collagenase (MMP-8), gelatinase A (MMP-2), and the ectodomain of MT1-MMP (ectMMP-14) degrade fibrillar collagen were examined. In particular, the hydrolysis of type I collagen at 37 degrees C was investigated to identify functional differences in the processing of the two alpha-chain types of fibrillar collagen. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were used for a quantitative comparison of the binding, unwinding, and hydrolysis of triple helical collagen. We demonstrate that the MMP family has developed at least two distinct mechanisms for collagen unwinding and cleavage. MMP-8 and ectMMP-14 display a similar mechanism (although with different catalytic parameters), which is characterized by binding (likely through the hemopexin-like domain) and cleavage of alpha-1 and/or alpha-2 chains without distinguishing between them and keeping the gross conformation of the triple helix (at least during the first cleavage step). On the other hand, MMP-2 binds preferentially the alpha-1 chains (likely through the fibronectin-like domain, which is not present in MMP-8 and ectMMP-14), grossly altering the whole triple helical arrangement of the collagen molecule and cleaving preferentially the alpha-2 chain. These distinctive mechanisms underly a drastically different mode of interaction with triple helical fibrillar collagen I, according to which the MMP domain is involved in binding. These findings can be related to the different role exerted by these MMPs on collagen homeostasis in the extracellular matrix.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2007.02.076DOI Listing
May 2007

Modulation of the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (gelatinase A) on fibrinogen.

Biochem J 2007 Mar;402(3):503-13

Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, I-00133 Roma, Italy.

The proteolytic processing of bovine fibrinogen by MMP-2 (gelatinase A), which brings about the formation of a product unable to form fibrin clots, has been studied at 37 degrees C. Catalytic parameters, although showing a somewhat lower catalytic efficiency with respect to thrombin and plasmin, indeed display values indicating a pathophysiological significance of this process. A parallel molecular modelling study predicts preferential binding of MMP-2 to the beta-chain of fibrinogen through its haemopexin-like domain, which has been directly demonstrated by the inhibitory effect in the presence of the exogenous haemopexin-like domain. However, the removal of this domain does not impair the interaction between MMP-2 and fibrinogen, but it dramatically alters the proteolytic mechanism, producing different fragmentation intermediates. The investigation at various pH values between 6.0 and 9.3 indicates a proton-linked behaviour, which is relevant for interpreting the influence on the process by environmental conditions occurring at the site of an injury. Furthermore, the action of MMP-2 on peroxynitrite-treated fibrinogen has been investigated, a situation possibly occurring under oxidative stress. The chemical alteration of fibrinogen, which has been shown to abolish its clotting activity, brings about only limited modifications of the catalytic parameters without altering the main enzymatic mechanism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BJ20061064DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1863560PMC
March 2007

pH-dependent redox and CO binding properties of chelated protoheme-L-histidine and protoheme-glycyl-L-histidine complexes.

J Biol Inorg Chem 2006 Mar 10;11(2):153-67. Epub 2005 Dec 10.

Department of Molecular, Cellular and Animal Biology, University of Camerino, Via F. Camerini 2, 62032 Camerino, Italy.

The pH dependence of redox properties, spectroscopic features and CO binding kinetics for the chelated protohemin-6(7)-L-histidine methyl ester (heme-H) and the chelated protohemin-6(7)-glycyl-L-histidine methyl ester (heme-GH) systems has been investigated between pH 2.0 and 12.0. The two heme systems appear to be modulated by four protonating groups, tentatively identified as coordinated H(2)O, one of heme's propionates, N(epsilon) of the coordinating imidazole, and the carboxylate of the histidine residue upon hydrolysis of the methyl ester group (in acid medium). The pK (a) values are different for the two hemes, thus reflecting structural differences. In particular, the different strain at the Fe-N(epsilon) bond, related to the different length of the coordinating arm, results in a dramatic alteration of the bond strength, which is much smaller in heme-H than in heme-GH. It leads to a variation in the variation of the pKa for the protonation of the N(epsilon) of the axial imidazole as well as in the proton-linked behavior of the other protonating groups, envisaging a cross-talk communication mechanism among different groups of the heme, which can be operative and relevant also in the presence of the protein matrix.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00775-005-0060-yDOI Listing
March 2006

Effect of axial coordination on the kinetics of assembly and folding of the two halves of horse heart cytochrome C.

J Biol Chem 2004 Dec 22;279(51):52860-8. Epub 2004 Sep 22.

Department of Molecular, Cellular and Animal Biology, University of Camerino, Via F. Camerini 2, I-62032 Camerino, Italy.

The kinetics of the assembly of two complementary fragments of oxidized horse heart cytochrome c (cyt c), namely the heme-containing fragment-(1-56) and the fragment-(57-104), have been characterized at different pH values. At neutral pH the fragment-(1-56) is hexacoordinated and has two histidines axially ligated to the heme-Fe(III) (Santucci, R., Fiorucci, L., Sinibaldi, F., Polizio, F., Desideri, A., and Ascoli, F. (2000) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 379, 331-336), thus mimicking what occurs in the folding intermediate of cyt c. The kinetics of the formation of the complex between the two fragments are characterized at pH 7.0 by a slow rate constant that is independent of the concentration of the reactants; conversely, at a low pH the kinetics are much faster and depend on the concentration of the fragments. This behavior suggests that the rate-limiting step observed in the recombination process of the fragments at neutral pH (that leads to the final coordination of Met-80) has to be ascribed to the detachment of the "misligated" histidine. Thus, the faster recombination rate at a low pH can be related to the fact that histidine is protonated and not able to coordinate to the metal. Furthermore, the independence of the rate constant on the concentration of the reactants observed at pH 7.0 can be accounted for by the occurrence of a conformational transition, which takes place immediately after the two fragments collapse together, likely simulating what induces the detachment of the misligated histidine during cytochrome folding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M403127200DOI Listing
December 2004

A correlation between knee cartilage degradation observed by arthroscopy and synovial proteinases activities.

Clin Biochem 2003 Jun;36(4):295-304

Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemistry Science, University of Rome TorVergata, Rome, Italy.

Objective: A novel study has been carried out to characterize the amount and activity levels of metalloproteinases (i.e., MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9 and MMP-13) and of their inhibitors (i.e., TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) in synovial fluid from patients (n = 56) with different degrees of either chondral lesions or knee arthritis identified and classified by arthroscopy.

Design And Methods: Zymographies, Western blotting and ELISA tests have been used to correlate the disease stage, as determined by arthroscopy, and both the amount and the activation state of different MMPs and of their inhibitors.

Results: Analysis of data obtained demonstrates that the degree of cartilage degradation, as seen by arthroscopy, is strictly related to the activity of some synovial MMPs, in particular MMP-2 and MMP-13 and on reduced inhibitory effect of MMP-2 by TIMP-2; in addition, a serine protease weighing about 125 kDa appears only in patients with severe cartilage degradation, i.e., with knee arthritis.

Conclusions: On the whole, this is the first study in which an analysis of synovial MMPs/other proteinases activity and TIMPs has been strictly related to arthroscopy results in patients with different degrees of osteoarthritis. Results indicate that an imbalance between specific MMP activities and the amount of TIMPs and of its inhibitory efficiency is crucial for the disease evolution and it is related to the disease stage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0009-9120(03)00029-8DOI Listing
June 2003

Modulation of the catalytic activity of neutrophil collagenase MMP-8 on bovine collagen I. Role of the activation cleavage and of the hemopexin-like domain.

J Biol Chem 2002 Jun 12;277(26):23123-30. Epub 2002 Apr 12.

Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via di Tor Vergata 135, I-00133 Roma, Italy.

The cleavage of bovine collagen I by neutrophil collagenase MMP-8 has been followed at pH 7.4, 37 degrees C. The behavior of the whole enzyme molecule (whMMP-8), displaying both the catalytic domain and the hemopexin-like domain, has been compared under the same experimental conditions with that of the catalytic domain only. The main observation is that whMMP-8 cleaves bovine collagen I only at a single specific site, as already reported by many others (Mallya, S. K., Mookhtiar, K. A., Gao, Y., Brew, K., Dioszegi, M., Birkedal-Hansen, H., and van Wart, H. E. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 10628-10634; Knäuper, V., Osthues, A., DeClerk, Y. A., Langley, K. A., Bläser, J., and Tschesche, H. (1993) Biochem. J. 291, 847-854; Marini, S., Fasciglione, G. F., De Sanctis, G., D'Alessio, S., Politi, V., and Coletta, M. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 18657-18663), whereas the catalytic domain lacks this specificity and cleaves the collagen molecule at multiple sites. Furthermore, a meaningful difference is observed for the cleavage features displayed by two forms of the catalytic domain, which differ for the N terminus resulting from the activation process (i.e. the former Met(80) of the proenzyme (MetMMP-8) and the former Phe(79) of the proenzyme (PheMMP-8)). Thus, the PheMMP-8 species is characterized by a much faster k(cat)/K(m), fully attributable to a lower K(m), suggesting that the conformation of the catalytic domain, induced by the insertion of this N-terminal residue in a specific pocket (Reinemer, P., Grams, F., Huber, R., Kleine, T., Schnierer, S., Piper, M., Tschesche, H., and Bode, W. (1994) FEBS Lett. 338, 227-233), brings about a better, although less discriminatory, recognition process of cleavage site(s) on bovine collagen I.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110873200DOI Listing
June 2002
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