Publications by authors named "Giorgia Canellini"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

[Hematology in the time of COVID-19].

Rev Med Suisse 2020 Apr;16(N° 691-2):823-826

Service et Laboratoire central d'Hématologie, Département d'Oncologie et Département des Laboratoires et de Pathologie, CHUV, 1011 Lausanne.

The COVID-19 pandemic impacts the hematology practice. Intensive chemotherapies for high-grade lymphomas and acute leukemias, multiple myeloma treatments and most hematopoietic stem cell transplantations should be performed as usual. Low-grade lymphomas should only be treated when strictly indicated, maintenance can be postponed. Other myeloid neoplasia and their therapies cause imunosupression; dose adjustment is recommended but no brisk stopping. Sickle cell anemia patients are highly succeptible to severe COVID-19 course. Thrombocytopenia and procoagulant state are associated with severe courses of COVID-19, requiring an individualized therapy. No data indicate a risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission through blood product transfusion.
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April 2020

Perioperative care of children with sickle cell disease: A systematic review and clinical recommendations.

Am J Hematol 2020 01 2;95(1):78-96. Epub 2019 Oct 2.

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Unit, Division of Pediatrics, Department "Woman-Mother-Child", Lausanne University Hospital and Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) require specific perioperative care, and clinical practice in this area remains poorly defined. We aimed to conduct a systematic, PRISMA-based review of the literature, available clinical guidelines and practice recommendations. We also aimed to extract any valuable information for the "best of available-evidence"-based prevention of perioperative adverse events in children with SCD, and highlight the most urgent priorities in clinical research. As data sources, US National Library of Medicine, Medline, National Guideline Clearinghouse, International Guideline Network, TRIP databases were searched for any content until January 2019. We also included institutional, consortia and expert group guidelines. Included were reports/guidelines in English, French, German, and Italian. Excluded were reports on obstetrical and fetal management. We identified 202 reports/guidelines fulfilling the criteria outlined above. A majority focused on visceral, cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery procedures, and only five were multicenter randomized controlled trials and two prospective randomized studies. After grading of the quality of the evidence, the extracted data was summarized into clinical recommendations for daily practice. Additionally, we designed a risk-grading algorithm to identify contexts likely to be associated with adverse outcomes. In conclusion, we provide a systematic PRISMA-based review of the existing literature and ancillary practice and delineate a set of clinical recommendations and priorities for research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.25626DOI Listing
January 2020

The clinical and biological impact of new pathogen inactivation technologies on platelet concentrates.

Blood Rev 2014 Nov 24;28(6):235-41. Epub 2014 Aug 24.

Service régional vaudois de transfusion, Route de la Corniche 2, 1066 Epalinges, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Since 1990, several techniques have been developed to photochemically inactivate pathogens in platelet concentrates, potentially leading to safer transfusion therapy. The three most common methods are amotosalen/UVA (INTERCEPT Blood System), riboflavin/UVA-UVB (MIRASOL PRT), and UVC (Theraflex-UV). We review the biology of pathogen inactivation methods, present their efficacy in reducing pathogens, discuss their impact on the functional aspects of treated platelets, and review clinical studies showing the clinical efficiency of the pathogen inactivation methods and their possible toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.blre.2014.07.005DOI Listing
November 2014

Red blood cell microparticles: clinical relevance.

Transfus Med Hemother 2012 Oct 27;39(5):342-7. Epub 2012 Aug 27.

Service Régional Vaudois de Transfusion Sanguine, Epalinges, Switzerland.

Summary: Microparticles are small phospholipid vesicles of less than 1 µm released into the blood flow by various types of cells such as endothelial, platelet, white or red blood cells. They are involved in many biological and physiological processes including hemostasis. In addition, an elevated number of microparticles in the blood is observed in various pathological situations. In the context of transfusion, erythrocyte-derived microparticles are found in red blood cell concentrates. Their role is not elucidated, and they are considered as a type of storage lesion. The purpose of this review is to present recent data showing that erythrocyte-derived microparticles most likely play a role in transfusion medicine and could cause transfusion complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000342228DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3678264PMC
October 2012

An analysis of the benefit of using HEV genotype 3 antigens in detecting anti-HEV IgG in a European population.

PLoS One 2013 7;8(5):e62980. Epub 2013 May 7.

Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Background: The benefit of using serological assays based on HEV genotype 3 in industrialised settings is unclear. We compared the performance of serological kits based on antigens from different HEV genotypes.

Methods: Taking 20 serum samples from patients in southwest France with acute HEV infection (positive PCR for HEV genotype 3) and 550 anonymised samples from blood donors in southwest Switzerland, we tested for anti-HEV IgG using three enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) (MP Diagnostics, Dia.Pro and Fortress) based on genotype 1 and 2 antigens, and one immunodot assay (Mikrogen Diagnostik recomLine HEV IgG/IgM) based on genotype 1 and 3 antigens.

Results: All acute HEV samples and 124/550 blood donor samples were positive with ≥1 assay. Of PCR-confirmed patient samples, 45%, 65%, 95% and 55% were positive with MP Diagnostics, Dia.Pro, Fortress and recomLine, respectively. Of blood donor samples positive with ≥1 assay, 120/124 (97%), were positive with Fortress, 19/124 (15%) were positive with all EIAs and 51/124 (41%) were positive with recomLine. Of 11/20 patient samples positive with recomLine, stronger reactivity for HEV genotype 3 was observed in 1/11(9%), and equal reactivity for both genotypes in 5/11 (45.5%).

Conclusions: Although recomLine contains HEV genotype 3, it has lower sensitivity than Fortress in acute HEV infection and fails to identify infection as being due to this genotype in approximately 45% of patients. In our single blood donor population, we observe wide variations in measured seroprevalence, from 4.2% to 21.8%, depending on the assay used.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0062980PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3646942PMC
December 2013

Red blood cell microparticles and blood group antigens: an analysis by flow cytometry.

Blood Transfus 2012 May;10 Suppl 2:s39-45

Service Régional Vaudois de Transfusion Sanguine, Epalinges, Switzerland.

Background: The storage of blood induces the formation of erythrocytes-derived microparticles. Their pathogenic role in blood transfusion is not known so far, especially the risk to trigger alloantibody production in the recipient. This work aims to study the expression of clinically significant blood group antigens on the surface of red blood cells microparticles.

Material And Methods: Red blood cells contained in erythrocyte concentrates were stained with specific antibodies directed against blood group antigens and routinely used in immunohematology practice. After inducing erythrocytes vesiculation with calcium ionophore, the presence of blood group antigens was analysed by flow cytometry.

Results: The expression of several blood group antigens from the RH, KEL, JK, FY, MNS, LE and LU systems was detected on erythrocyte microparticles. The presence of M (MNS1), N (MNS2) and s (MNS4) antigens could not be demonstrated by flow cytometry, despite that glycophorin A and B were identified on microparticles using anti-CD235a and anti-MNS3.

Discussion: We conclude that blood group antigens are localized on erythrocytes-derived microparticles and probably keep their immunogenicity because of their capacity to bind specific antibody. Selective segregation process during vesiculation or their ability to elicit an immune response in vivo has to be tested by further studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2450/2012.007SDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3418626PMC
May 2012

Unusual colours of plasma.

Br J Haematol 2012 Feb 8;156(4):419. Epub 2011 Nov 8.

Service Régional Vaudois de Transfusion Sanguine, Epalinges, Switzerland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2141.2011.08930.xDOI Listing
February 2012

Hepatitis E virus seroprevalence among blood donors in southwest Switzerland.

PLoS One 2011 20;6(6):e21150. Epub 2011 Jun 20.

Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) among blood donors in southwest Switzerland.

Background: HEV is recognized as a food-borne disease in industrialized countries, transmitted mainly through pork meat. Cases of transmission through blood transfusion have also been reported. Recent studies have revealed seroprevalence rates of 13.5%, 16.6% and 20.6% among blood donors in England, France and Denmark, respectively.

Methods: We analyzed 550 consecutive blood donor samples collected in the region of Lausanne, canton of Vaud, Switzerland, for the presence of anti-HEV IgG, using the MP Diagnostics HEV ELISA kit. For each donor, we documented age, sex and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) value.

Results: The study panel was composed of 332 men (60.4%) and 218 women (39.6%). Overall, anti-HEV IgG was found in 27 of 550 samples (4.9%). The seroprevalence was 5.4% (18/332) in men and 4.1% (9/218) in women. The presence of anti-HEV IgG was not correlated with age, gender or ALT values. However, we observed a peak in seroprevalence of 5.3% in individuals aged 51 to 70 years old.

Conclusions: Compared with other European countries, HEV seroprevalence among blood donors in southwest Switzerland is low. The low seroprevalence may be explained by the sensitivity of commercial tests used and/or the strict regulation of animal and meat imports. Data regarding HEV prevalence in Swiss livestock are lacking and merit exploration.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0021150PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3118806PMC
October 2011

Analysis and clinical relevance of microparticles from red blood cells.

Curr Opin Hematol 2010 Nov;17(6):571-7

Service Régional Vaudois de Transfusion Sanguine, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Purpose Of Review: The mechanisms involved in the formation of red blood cell (RBC) microparticles in vivo as well as during erythrocyte storage are reviewed, and the potential role of microparticles in transfusion medicine is described.

Recent Findings: Microparticles release is an integral part of the erythrocyte ageing process, preventing early removal of RBCs. Proteomics analyses have outlined the key role of band 3-ankyrin anchoring complex and the occurrence of selective RBC membrane remodelling mechanisms in microparticles formation. The presence of several RBC antigens, expressed on microparticles, has been demonstrated. The potential deleterious effects of RBC microparticles in transfused recipients, including hypercoagulability, microcirculation impairment and immunosuppression, are discussed.

Summary: Formation and role of RBC microparticles are far from being completely understood. Combining various approaches to elucidate these mechanisms could improve blood product quality and transfusion safety. Implementation of RBC microparticles as biomarkers in the laboratory routine needs to overcome technical barriers involved in their analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/moh.0b013e32833ec217DOI Listing
November 2010

Impact of 3 different short-term chemotherapy regimens on lymphocyte-depletion and reconstitution in melanoma patients.

J Immunother 2010 Sep;33(7):723-34

Multidisciplinary Oncology Center, University of Lausanne Hospitals, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

Recent immunotherapy trials have shown that lymphodepletion induced by short-term chemotherapy favors subsequent expansion of adoptively transferred T cells, by homeostatic mechanisms. To take advantage of this effect, novel regimens are being developed with the aim to enhance tumor immunity and reduce treatment toxicity. We have designed a clinical phase I trial combining chemotherapy, reinfusion of PBMC containing Melan-A(MART-1)-specific T cells, and vaccination with Melan-A peptide in Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant. Treatment with Busulfan plus Fludarabine depleted lymphocytes only weakly. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) plus Fludarabine depleted lymphocytes more profoundly, with a maximal effect using high doses of CTX. It is interesting to note that, the degree of homeostatic T-cell proliferation correlated tightly with the extent of lymphodepletion. As compared with CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells showed higher susceptibility to chemotherapy, followed by more rapid homeostatic proliferation and recovery, resulting in strong inversions of CD4/CD8 ratios. Despite efficient homeostatic proliferation of total CD4 and CD8 T cells, the frequency of CD8 T cells specific for Melan-A and cancer-testis antigens remained relatively low. In contrast, EBV-specific T cells expanded and reached high numbers. We conclude that short-term chemotherapy promoted homeostatic lymphocyte proliferation depending on the intensity of lymphocyte depletion, however without preferential expansion of tumor antigen-specific T cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CJI.0b013e3181ea7e6eDOI Listing
September 2010

Efficacy of individual nucleic acid amplification testing in reducing the risk of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis B virus infection in Switzerland, a low-endemic region.

Transfusion 2010 Dec;50(12):2695-706

Blood Transfusion Service SRC Berne, Berne, Switzerland.

Background: The risk of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Switzerland by testing blood donors for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) alone has been historically estimated at 1:160,000 transfusions. The Swiss health authorities decided not to introduce mandatory antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) testing but to evaluate the investigation of HBV nucleic acid testing (NAT).

Study Design And Methods: Between June 2007 and February 2009, a total of 306,000 donations were screened routinely for HBsAg and HBV DNA by triplex individual-donation (ID)-NAT (Ultrio assay on Tigris system, Gen-Probe/Novartis Diagnostics). ID-NAT repeatedly reactive donors were further characterized for HBV serologic markers and viral load by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The relative sensitivity of screening for HBsAg, anti-HBc, and HBV DNA was assessed. The residual HBV transmission risk of NAT with or without anti-HBc and HBsAg was retrospectively estimated in a mathematical model.

Results: From the 306,000 blood donations, 31 were repeatedly Ultrio test reactive and confirmed HBV infected, of which 24 (77%) and 27 (87%) were HBsAg and anti-HBc positive, respectively. Seven HBV-NAT yields were identified (1:44,000), two pre-HBsAg window period (WP) donations (1:153,000) and five occult HBV infections (1:61,000). Introduction of ID-NAT reduced the risk of HBV WP transmission in repeat donors from 1:95,000 to 1:296,000.

Conclusions: Triplex NAT screening reduced the HBV WP transmission risk approximately threefold. NAT alone was more efficacious than the combined use of HBsAg and anti-HBc. The data from this study led to the decision to introduce sensitive HBV-NAT screening in Switzerland. Our findings may be useful in designing more efficient and cost-effective HBV screening strategies in low-prevalence countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2010.02732.xDOI Listing
December 2010

Oxidation of proteins: Basic principles and perspectives for blood proteomics.

Proteomics Clin Appl 2008 Feb;2(2):142-57

Service Régional Vaudois de Transfusion Sanguine, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Protein oxidation mechanisms result in a wide array of modifications, from backbone cleavage or protein crosslinking to more subtle modifications such as side chain oxidations. Protein oxidation occurs as part of normal regulatory processes, as a defence mechanism against oxidative stress, or as a deleterious processes when antioxidant defences are overcome. Because blood is continually exposed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, blood proteomics should inherently adopt redox proteomic strategies. In this review, we recall the biochemical basis of protein oxidation, review the proteomic methodologies applied to analyse redox modifications, and highlight some physiological and in vitro responses to oxidative stress of various blood components.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/prca.200780009DOI Listing
February 2008

Polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia with hyperviscosity syndrome.

Br J Haematol 2002 Jan;116(1)

Division of Haematology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2141.2002.03208.xDOI Listing
January 2002