Publications by authors named "Gesche Tallen"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Deliberations about clinical pharmacogenetic testing in pediatric oncology.

Per Med 2021 Jul 11;18(4):399-405. Epub 2021 May 11.

Department of Pediatrics & BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Division of Translational Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4, Canada.

This article summarizes the background, content and outcomes of a special meeting that was convened among oncologists and scientists to discuss the role of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing in pediatric clinical oncology practice. This meeting provided an opportunity for what the lead author (AM Issa) refers to as the 'voice of the clinician' dynamic to be amplified in order to better understand how personalized or precision medicine applications such as PGx testing are adopted and incorporated into clinical settings and what we can learn from the experiences of current and ongoing implementation PGx approaches to further the implementation of precision medicine applications in real-world environments. Group dynamics and clinical experience with PGx testing and return of results shaped the discussion.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/pme-2020-0120DOI Listing
July 2021

Reduced vs. standard dose native E. coli-asparaginase therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: long-term results of the randomized trial Moscow-Berlin 2002.

J Cancer Res Clin Oncol 2019 Apr 6;145(4):1001-1012. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Department of Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, Regional Oncological Hospital, Orenburg, Russia.

Purpose: Favorable outcomes were achieved for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with the first Russian multicenter trial Moscow-Berlin (ALL-MB) 91. One major component of this regimen included a total of 18 doses of weekly intramuscular (IM) native Escherichia coli-derived asparaginase (E. coli-ASP) at 10000 U/m during three consolidation courses. ASP was initially available from Latvia, but had to be purchased from abroad at substantial costs after the collapse of Soviet Union. Therefore, the subsequent trial ALL-MB 2002 aimed at limiting costs to a reasonable extent and also at reducing toxicity by lowering the dose for standard risk (SR-) patients to 5000 U/m without jeopardizing efficacy.

Methods: Between April 2002 and November 2006, 774 SR patients were registered in 34 centers across Russia and Belarus, 688 of whom were randomized. In arm ASP-5000 (n = 334), patients received 5000 U/m and in arm ASP-10000 (n = 354) 10 000 U/m IM.

Results: Probabilities of disease-free survival, overall survival and cumulative incidence of relapse at 10 years were comparable: 79 ± 2%, 86 ± 2% and 17.4 ± 2.1% (ASP-5000) vs. 75 ± 2% and 82 ± 2%, and 17.9 ± 2.0% (ASP-10000), while death in complete remission was significantly lower in arm ASP-5000 (2.7% vs. 6.5%; p = 0.029).

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that weekly 5000 U/mE. coli-ASP IM during consolidation therapy are equally effective, more cost-efficient and less toxic than 10000 U/m for SR patients with childhood ALL.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00432-019-02854-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6435612PMC
April 2019

Clinical significance of cytogenetic changes in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of the multicenter group Moscow-Berlin (MB).

Leuk Lymphoma 2019 02 1;60(2):426-432. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

i Dmitry Rogachev National Medical Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Charité CVK, Universitätsmedizin Berlin , Berlin , Germany.

The prognostic significance of genetic lesions in T-cell ALL still needs to be elucidated. Karyotyping and FISH were performed in samples from 120 patients with T-cell ALL registered in the trial Moscow-Berlin 2008. Most frequent rearrangements were TLX3 (N = 29; 24%) and TAL1 (N = 18; 15%), followed by KMT2A (N = 6; 5%), TLX1 (N = 5; 4.2%), and 11p13-15 (N = 5; 4.2%). In 16.7% of patients, the karyotype was normal, and in 30.8% 'other' aberrations were seen. Patients with a normal karyotype, TAL1, or KMT2A rearrangements had the most favorable outcome (probability of event free survival (pEFS): 82% ± 6%), while prognosis for patients with TLX3 and TLX1 rearrangements and 'other' aberrations was less favorable (pEFS: 62% ± 6%). Worst outcome was observed for five patients with 11p rearrangements (pEFS: 20% ± 18%). In summary, three subgroups of patients with T-cell ALL with significantly different outcomes could be defined by cytogenetic profiling.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428194.2018.1485904DOI Listing
February 2019

DisorderING promotes epigenetic order.

FEBS Lett 2017 01 16;591(2):257-259. Epub 2017 Jan 16.

Departments of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Oncology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1873-3468.12552DOI Listing
January 2017

Strategies to improve the quality of survival for childhood brain tumour survivors.

Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2015 Nov 26;19(6):619-39. Epub 2015 Jul 26.

Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address:

Background: Tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) are the most frequent solid tumours and the second most frequent type of cancer in children and adolescents. Overall survival has continuously improved in Germany, since an increasing number of patients have been treated according to standardised, multicentre, multimodal treatment recommendations, trials of the German Paediatric Brain Tumour Consortium (HIT-Network) or the International Society of Paediatric Oncology-Europe (SIOP-E) during the last decades. Today, two out of three patients survive. At least 8000 long-term childhood brain tumour survivors (CBTS) are currently living in Germany. They face lifelong disease- and treatment-related late effects (LE) and associated socioeconomic problems more than many other childhood cancer survivors (CCS).

Method: We review the LE and resulting special needs of this particular group of CCS.

Results: Despite their increasing relevance for future treatment optimisation, neither the diversity of chronic and cumulative LE nor their pertinent risk factors and subsequent impact on quality of survival have yet been comprehensively addressed for CBTS treated according to HIT- or SIOP-E-protocols. Evidence-based information to empower survivors and stakeholders, as well as medical expertise to manage their individual health care, psychosocial and educational/vocational needs must still be generated and established.

Conclusion: The establishment of a long-term research- and care network in Germany shall contribute to a European platform, that aims at optimising CBTSs' transition into adulthood as resilient individuals with high quality of survival including optimal levels of activity, participation and acceptance by society.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpn.2015.07.011DOI Listing
November 2015

Keep-ING balance: tumor suppression by epigenetic regulation.

FEBS Lett 2014 Aug 14;588(16):2728-42. Epub 2014 Mar 14.

Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada. Electronic address:

Cancer cells accumulate genetic and epigenetic changes that alter gene expression to drive tumorigenesis. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor, cell cycle, differentiation and DNA repair genes contributes to neoplastic transformation. The ING (inhibitor of growth) proteins (ING1-ING5) have emerged as a versatile family of growth regulators, phospholipid effectors, histone mark sensors and core components of HDAC1/2 - and several HAT chromatin-modifying complexes. This review will describe the characteristic pathways by which ING family proteins differentially affect the Hallmarks of Cancer and highlight the various epigenetic mechanisms by which they regulate gene expression. Finally, we will discuss their potentials as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in epigenetic treatment strategies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.febslet.2014.03.011DOI Listing
August 2014

[Treatment of children and adolescents with relapsed ALL: therapy target long-term healing].

Pharm Unserer Zeit 2012 May;41(3):214-21

Kinderklinik m. S. Hämatologie/Onkologie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pauz.201200470DOI Listing
May 2012

The p53 tumor suppressor is stabilized by inhibitor of growth 1 (ING1) by blocking polyubiquitination.

PLoS One 2011 22;6(6):e21065. Epub 2011 Jun 22.

Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

The INhibitor of Growth tumor suppressors (ING1-ING5) affect aging, apoptosis, DNA repair and tumorigenesis. Plant homeodomains (PHD) of ING proteins bind histones in a methylation-sensitive manner to regulate chromatin structure. ING1 and ING2 contain a polybasic region (PBR) adjacent to their PHDs that binds stress-inducible phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PtIn-MP) signaling lipids to activate these INGs. ING1 induces apoptosis independently of p53 but other studies suggest proapoptotic interdependence of ING1 and p53 leaving their functional relationship unclear. Here we identify a novel ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) that overlaps with the PBR of ING1 and shows similarity to previously described UBDs involved in DNA damage responses. The ING1 UBD binds ubiquitin with high affinity (K(d)∼100 nM) and ubiquitin competes with PtIn-MPs for ING1 binding. ING1 expression stabilized wild-type, but not mutant p53 in an MDM2-independent manner and knockdown of endogenous ING1 depressed p53 levels in a transcription-independent manner. ING1 stabilized unmodified and six multimonoubiquitinated forms of wild-type p53 that were also seen upon DNA damage, but not p53 mutants lacking the six known sites of ubiquitination. We also find that ING1 physically interacts with herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease (HAUSP), a p53 and MDM2 deubiquitinase (DUB), and knockdown of HAUSP blocks the ability of ING1 to stabilize p53. These data link lipid stress signaling to ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation through the PBR/UBD of ING1 and further indicate that ING1 stabilizes p53 by inhibiting polyubiquitination of multimonoubiquitinated forms via interaction with and colocalization of the HAUSP-deubiquitinase with p53.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0021065PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3120833PMC
November 2011

Outcome of children and adolescents with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and non-response to salvage protocol therapy: a retrospective analysis of the ALL-REZ BFM Study Group.

Eur J Cancer 2011 Jan 20;47(1):90-7. Epub 2010 Oct 20.

Department of Paediatric Oncology/Hematology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Aim Of The Study: Non-response (NR) to treatment of childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is an end-point of protocol therapy. Subsequent management has not yet been standardised. This study analyses different approaches after NR to aid optimising future strategies.

Patients And Methods: Ninety-three children with NR to treatment according to ALL relapse-protocols of the Berlin/Frankfurt/Muenster (BFM) Study Group (03/1990-2006/1999) were retrospectively assigned to a curative (C: intensive polychemotherapies, stem cell transplantation (SCT); n=51), palliative (P: 1-2 antineoplastic agents; n=23) or supportive (S: no antineoplastic therapy; n=19) treatment approach.

Results: Median survival after diagnosis of NR were 121 (C), 89 (P) and 42 (S) days, respectively (p<0.001). In cohort C, a complete remission (2ndCR) was obtained in 16/51 patients, among these 13 only after SCT, and nine children achieved partial remission. Ten of the 51 patients died from treatment-related complications, 39/51 from disease progression. Today, two patients are still in continuous CR after SCT. Adverse prognostic factors were overrepresented in the non-curative cohorts. Time-point of relapse and treatment after NR were independent predictors of survival duration. Most patients without antineoplastic treatment died at home, the majority of the others in the hospital.

Conclusions: Treatment after NR has been heterogeneous and customised. Therapies with curative intent are capable of inducing 2ndCR but associated with high treatment-related morbidity, -mortality and minimal survival. NR patients may, therefore, be ideal candidates for controlled phase I/II trials, thus offering them a chance to benefit from new drugs and promoting drug development for cohorts with better prognosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2010.09.020DOI Listing
January 2011

The inhibitor of growth 1 (ING1) is involved in trichostatin A-induced apoptosis and caspase 3 signaling in p53-deficient glioblastoma cells.

Oncol Res 2010 ;18(10):469-80

Department of Pediatric Oncology/Haematology, Charité, Universitätsmedizin-Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Prognosis for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is poor. Inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACi) like trichostatin A (TSA) are promising alternatives to conventional treatment. Deficient tumor suppressor functions, such as TP53 mutations and p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a) deletions, are characteristic for GBM and can cause resistance to DNA damaging agents such as cisplatin and to HDACi like TSA. The type II tumor suppressor Inhibitor of growth 1 (ING1) is involved in DNA damage response and histone modification. We have previously shown that ING1 is downregulated in GBM and involved in glioma-induced angiogenesis and in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in malignant glioma cells. Hence, the goal of our present study was to investigate whether TSA affects ING1 protein expression and also whether modulating ING1 levels affects TSA-induced apoptosis in malignant glioma cells that contain deficient p53 function and inactive pl4(ARF)/p16(INK4a) signaling. If so, we asked, which apoptotic pathway might be the major mediator beyond this interaction. To test whether ING1 proteins function in TSA-induced apoptosis in GBM, we analyzed TSA effects in LN229 GBM cells, which harbor TP53 mutations and INK4a deletion, following ING1 knockdown by siRNA. Expression of ING1, acetylated core histones H3 and H4, and the proapoptotic proteins caspase 3 and Fas-associated death domain (FADD) was determined by Western blotting. Percentages of apoptotic cells were obtained by flow cytometry. TSA induced the major ING1 isoform p33(ING1b) and increased levels of both histone acetylation and apoptosis in LN229 cells. ING1 knockdown cells revealed marked resistance to TSA-induced apoptosis, impairment of caspase 3 activation, and suppression of FADD. The data suggest that ING1 contributes to TSA-induced apoptosis in GBM cells with deficient p53 and p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a) functions, possibly by regulating FADD/caspase 3 signaling.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096504010x12704916124828DOI Listing
August 2010

Long-term outcome in children with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia after time-point and site-of-relapse stratification and intensified short-course multidrug chemotherapy: results of trial ALL-REZ BFM 90.

J Clin Oncol 2010 May 12;28(14):2339-47. Epub 2010 Apr 12.

Departments of Pediatric and Arend von Stackelberg Oncology/Hematology and of General Pediatrics, Charit-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.

Purpose: The multicenter trial ALL-REZ BFM (ie, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapse Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster) 90 was designed to improve prognosis for children with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by time-to-relapse- and site-of-relapse-adapted stratification and by introduction of novel chemotherapy elements and to evaluate new prognostic parameters in a large, population-based cohort.

Patients And Methods: Five hundred twenty-five patients stratified into risk groups A (early bone marrow [BM] relapses), B (late BM relapses), and C (isolated extramedullary relapses) received alternating short-course intensive polychemotherapy (in blocks R1, R2, or R3) and cranial/craniospinal irradiation followed by maintenance therapy. Block R3 (high-dose cytarabine and etoposide) was introduced to improve the outcome compared with historical controls. Patients with early BM or T-ALL relapse (poor prognosis group [PPG]) were eligible for experimental regimens. One hundred seventeen patients received stem-cell transplantation (SCT).

Results: The probabilities (and standard deviations) of event-free survival (pEFS) and overall survival (pOS) at 10 years were 0.30 +/- .02 and 0.36 +/- .02, respectively. Significant differences existed between strategic groups (pEFS(A) = .17 +/- .03; pEFS(B) = .43 +/- .04; pEFS(C) = .54 +/- .06; pEFS(PPG) = .15 +/- .03; log-rank P < .001). Patients of high-risk groups A plus PPG did better with SCT than with chemotherapy (pEFS = .33 +/- .05 v 0.20 +/- .05; P = .005). The pEFS was similar to trials ALL-REZ BFM 85/87 (.36 +/- .03. v 0.37 +/- .03; P = .419; PPG excluded). Time point, site of relapse, immunophenotype, and SCT were significant predictors of pEFS in multivariate analyses.

Conclusion: More than one third of patients in this large, population-based trial were cured. Neither R3 nor adaptation of chemotherapy intensity was capable of improving pEFS or of overcoming prognostic factors. In high-risk patients, remission induction regimens must be improved, and allogeneic SCT should be recommended in patients achieving second complete remission.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2009.25.1983DOI Listing
May 2010

Caffeine confers radiosensitization of PTEN-deficient malignant glioma cells by enhancing ionizing radiation-induced G1 arrest and negatively regulating Akt phosphorylation.

Mol Cancer Ther 2010 Feb 26;9(2):480-8. Epub 2010 Jan 26.

Translational Radiobiology and Radiooncology Research Laboratory, Department of Radiotherapy, Charité Campus Mitte, Charité Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité Universitätsmedizin-Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

PTEN mutations are frequently found in malignant glioma and can result in activated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt survival signaling associated with resistance to radiotherapy. Strategies to interfere with aberrant PI3K/Akt activity are therefore being developed to improve the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy in patients with malignant glioma. The methylxanthine caffeine has been described as a PI3K inhibitor and is also known to sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. However, a direct association between these two caffeine-mediated effects has not been reported yet. Therefore, we asked whether caffeine or its derivative pentoxifylline differentially affect the radiosensitivity of malignant gliomas with different PTEN status. As models, we used the radiosensitive EA14 malignant glioma cell line containing wild-type PTEN and the radioresistant U87MG malignant glioma cell line harboring mutant PTEN. Our study revealed that caffeine and pentoxifylline radiosensitized PTEN-deficient but not PTEN-proficient glioma cells. Radiosensitization of PTEN-deficient U87MG cells by caffeine was significantly correlated with the activation of the G(1) DNA damage checkpoint that occurred independently of de novo synthesis of p53 and p21. The p53 independency was also confirmed by a significant caffeine-mediated radiosensitization of the glioma cell lines T98G and U373MG that are deficient for both PTEN and p53. Furthermore, caffeine-mediated radiosensitization was associated with the inhibition of Akt hyperphosphorylation in PTEN-deficient cells to a level comparable with PTEN-proficient cells. Our data suggest that the methylxanthine caffeine or its derivative pentoxifylline are promising candidate drugs for the radiosensitization of glioma cells particularly with PTEN mutations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-09-0498DOI Listing
February 2010

The inhibitor of growth 1 (ING1) proteins suppress angiogenesis and differentially regulate angiopoietin expression in glioblastoma cells.

Oncol Res 2009 ;18(2-3):95-105

Department of Pediatric Oncology/Haematology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 13353 Berlin, Germany.

The inhibitor of growth 1 (ING1) homologue ING4 has previously been implicated as a negative regulator of angiogenesis in a murine glioma and a multiple myeloma model. An association between ING1 and angiogenesis has not been reported yet. Our previous studies using tumor samples from patients have shown that ING1 levels are downregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), one of the most highly vascularized malignancies. Based on this background, the goal of this study was to test the effects of the major ING1 splicing isoforms, p47ING1a and p33ING1b, on pathological angiogenesis induced by human GBM cells. We used a chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to examine whether LN229 human GBM cells can induce angiogenesis and whether alterations in ING1 expression, such as ING1 knockdown by siRNA or ectopic ING1 overexpression using ING1a and ING1b expression constructs, can affect this process. Increased ING1 protein expression significantly suppressed LN229 cell-induced angiogenesis in the CAM assay. While no effects on the proangiogenic factors VEGF or IL-8 were noted, the expression of angiopoietins (Ang) 1 and 4 were increased by the p47ING1a, but not by the p33ING1b isoform. Levels of Ang-2 were not sensitive to altered ING1 levels. Our data are the first to suggest that ING1 proteins suppress neoangiogenesis in GBM. Moreover, our results may support the idea that ING1 proteins regulate the expression of proteins that are critical for angiogenesis in GBM such as the angiopoietins.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096504009789954645DOI Listing
January 2010

The cancer-aging interface and the significance of telomere dynamics in cancer therapy.

Rejuvenation Res 2007 Sep;10(3):387-95

Department of Pediatric Oncology and Haematology, Charité, Universitätsmedizin-Berlin, Campus Virchow, Berlin, Germany.

The efficacy of most cancer treatments depends markedly on the high replication rate of cancer cells, a characteristic frequently observed in neoplasms with higher grades of malignancy. Yet, the same characteristic is present in many normal regenerative tissues of the body, which makes them susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutics and accounts for many of the toxic side effects of these drugs. In response to cell killing by chemotherapeutics, normal regenerative tissues replicate at a faster rate to regenerate, resulting in accelerated telomere attrition and leaving different cell populations with telomeres shorter than they would normally have in the absence of treatment. This accelerated erosion has implications regarding the recurrence of cancers at secondary sites because reduced replicative ability may compromise effective subsequent immune responses. In this review we discuss recent reports describing the effect of chemotherapeutics on telomere loss, how this may impact healthy tissues in an age-dependent manner, and describe in brief emerging cancer treatments that may avoid this telomere erosion effect.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/rej.2007.0598DOI Listing
September 2007

No ING1 mutations in human brain tumours but reduced expression in high malignancy grades of astrocytoma.

Int J Cancer 2004 Apr;109(3):476-9

Department of Pediatric Oncology, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

The ING1 family of proteins has been shown to have regulatory functions in oncogenesis, apoptosis, DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. Here we present the first report on LOH analysis of the ING1 locus, mutation analysis of the complete coding sequence including intron-exon boundaries and expression analysis of the different ING1 splice products and protein isoforms in primary brain tumours. No somatic ING1 mutations were detected. Semi-quantitative analysis revealed higher levels of p33ING1b RNA in benign than in malignant lesions. This correlation was significant in a subset of 37 astrocytic tumours WHO grades I to IV. ING1 protein isoforms p47ING1a, p33ING1b and p24ING1c were found to be expressed variably in this series. Our findings support a regulatory contribution of ING1 to the development or progression of brain tumours.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.11715DOI Listing
April 2004

DNA measurement, proliferation markers, and other factors in pituitary adenomas.

Endocr Pathol 1994 Dec;5(4):198-211

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Hamburg, Hamurg, Germany.

To assess the proliferative activity of pituitary adenomas, 36 surgically removed adenomas were studied by light microscopical parameters; mitotic count; expression of PCNA, Ki-67, cathepsin D, and EGF; and image cytometry. Three adenomas (9%) showed high, 11 (34%) medium, 17 (53%) moderate, and 1 (3%) low structural differentiation. In 10 adenomas (31%), no mitosis was observed. The average was 2.4 mitoses/100 HPF; the highest count was 7.1 mitoses/100 HPF. Eleven adenomas (33.3%) were PCNA-negative; in 20 adenomas (60.6%), between 0.05 and 3.9, and in 2 adenomas (6.0%), between 10.5 and 16.4 PCNA-positive nuclei were observed. Only a recurrent null-cell adenoma (9%) was Ki-67-negative. Three adenomas (9.1%) were EGF-negative, 28 (84.8%) showed up to 10% positive cells, and 2 (6.1 %) showed between 10 and 30% positive cells; 19 adenomas (68%) were cathepsin D-negative, including all endocrine-inactive adenomas. Half the adenomas had an euploid DMA stem line. Endocrine-inactive adenomas displayed a higher rate of euploid DNA stem lines than endocrine-active adenomas. The S-phase fraction varied between 2.97 and 28%, with a mean value of 14.4%. Half the adenomas showed an S-phase fraction of 11.65% or lower.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02921487DOI Listing
December 1994