Publications by authors named "Gertrud Müller"

27 Publications

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Dioctophimosis: A Parasitic Zoonosis of Public Health Importance.

Adv Exp Med Biol 2021 ;1306:129-142

Project Dioctophyme renale in Dogs and Cats (PRODIC), Department of Veterinary Clinics, Veterinary College, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

Dioctophyme renale, the giant kidney worm, is a renal nematode from domestic and wild mammals that has zoonotic potential. In humans, dioctophimosis has been reported in several countries, mainly on the Asian continent, totaling more than 40 cases, which describe the parasite mainly infecting the kidneys, bladder, urethra and skin. Infection in animals and humans is related to the ingestion of the infective larva (L3) present in the aquatic oligochaete annelid (mandatory intermediate host) or fish and anurans (facultative paratenic hosts). Thus, the infection is related to the habit of drinking water contaminated with the mandatory intermediate host, as well as raw or undercooked meat from the facultative paratenic hosts. Dioctophimosis destroys the renal parenchyma and, in some cases, can cause the death of its hosts. In this chapter, we discuss the main topics regarding dioctophimosis in humans, domestic and wild animals, highlighting its importance in public health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-63908-2_10DOI Listing
May 2021

First record of Lagochilascaris minor (Nematoda: Ascarididae) in Leopardus geoffroyi (Carnivora: Felidae) in Brazil.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2019 Oct-Dec;28(4):812-815

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Lagochilascariasis is a parasitic disease caused by nematodes of the genus Lagochilascaris. These parasites occur in the neotropical region and their definitive hosts are wild animals, domestic dogs and felids and, accidentally, humans. Here, infection by Lagochilascaris minor is recorded for the first time in a wild felid, in Brazil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612019087DOI Listing
January 2020

The role of freshwater fish in the life cycle of Dioctophyme renale in Southern Brazil.

Vet Parasitol Reg Stud Reports 2019 04 20;16:100274. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Laboratório de Ictiologia e Ecologia Aquática, Universidade Federal do Acre, Rodovia BR 364 Km 04, CEP 69915-900 Rio Branco, Acre, Brazil.

Brazil stands out by the diverse records of Dioctopphyme renale in different hosts; however, there is little information about the life cycle of the nematode in the region. This study aims to report on third-stage larvae infections in fish in southern Brazil. In this context, 324 fish of different species belonging to Characiformes, Cyprinodontiformes and Siluriformes were collected in an urban area of Rio Grande do Sul State, where domestic and wild hosts were reported with the nematode. Of the total fish examined, 25(7.7%) were found to be parasitized by third-stage larvae of D. renale which were found encysted in the stomach serous membrane and in the celoma cavity of Hoplosternum littorale (Siluriformes) with a prevalence of 53.2% (25/47) and mean intensity of infection of 4.4 larvae/host (1 to 13 larvae). The occurrence of larvae in H. littorale indicates the presence of parasitosis in the region; however, the contribution of this fish species as a source of infection for dogs in urban areas must be considered with caution given the difficulties these dogs may face in the capture and predation of the fish to the point of effectively maintaining the urban cycle of D. renale. In addition, the low level of larvae registered in the total sample of fish examined indicates that these hosts are unlikely to play an important role in the transmission of D. renale to domestic animals in the region of the study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vprsr.2019.100274DOI Listing
April 2019

Helminths Assemblage of the bare-faced ibis, Phimosus infuscatus (Lichtenstein, 1823) (Pelecaniformes: Threskiornithidae), in southern Brazil.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2019 Jan-Mar;28(1):40-46. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres - LAPASIL, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Birds act as hosts for a variety of parasites, many of these are unreported. The literature provides scant information on the helminth fauna of Phimosus infuscatus. The presence of helminths were investigate in 28 birds from Pelotas, Capão do Leão, and Rio Grande in Rio Grande do Sul. The preparation and identification of helminths followed protocols. Prevalence (P%), mean intensity of infection (MII), and mean abundance (MA) were estimated. The following helminths were found: Hystrichis acanthocephalicus , Dioctophyme renale (larva), Porrocaecum heteropterum , Baruscapillaria sp., Aproctella carinii , Paradeletrocephalus minor, and Cyathostoma sp. (Nematoda); Echinostomatidae gen. sp., Tanaisia valida, and Athesmia sp. (Trematoda: Digenea) and Megalacanthus sp. (Cestoda). The most prevalent species were H. acanthocephalicus, P. heteropterum, Megalacanthus sp., and Echinostomatidae gen. sp. and Megalacanthus sp. had the highest MII and MA. There was a significant difference in the prevalence of H. acantocephalicus between female and male bird hosts. We report Echinostomatidae gen. sp., T. valida, Athesmia sp., Cyathostoma sp., A. carinii, P. minor, D. renale (larva), Baruscapillaria sp., and Megalacanthus sp. for the first time in P. infuscatus in Brazil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612019001DOI Listing
July 2019

Occurrence of Dioctophyme renale larvae (Goeze, 1782) (Nematoda: Enoplida) in a new host from southern Brazil.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2018 Oct-Dec;27(4):609-613. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres - LAPASIL, Instituto de Biologia - IB, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Dioctophymatosis is caused by the giant kidney worm Dioctophyme renale which occurs in dogs, cats, and wild mammals. In Brazil, the disease has been diagnosed in dogs from several states around the country. In the present study, the occurrence of D. renale larvae in snakes from southern of Brazil is reported. Three specimens of Philodryas patagoniensis (Serpentes: Dipsadidae) (common names in Brazil: "parelheira", "papa-pinto") roadkill in the county of Capão do Leão, State of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil, were necropsied. Two third-stage larvae of D. renale were found in the coelomic cavity of P. patagoniensis. This study reveals a new host for D. renale larvae in the southern region of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This particular geographic area of the country has stood out as several cases of D. renale infection have been reported in a number of vertebrates from this region including domestic dogs and cats and wild animals such as carnivores, fish, and freshwater turtles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-296120180060DOI Listing
June 2019

Nasal mites (Mesostigmata, Rhinonyssidae) in Sternidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) on the southern Coast of Brazil.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2018 Jan-Mar;27(1):110-112. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas -UFPel, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Six species of birds of the family Sternidae are often found on the southern coast of South America. Sterna trudeaui, S. hirundinacea, Thalasseus maximus, T. acuflavidus and Sternula superciliaris are South American residents and Sterna hirundo, a Nearctic migrant. At least 500 species of nasal mites have been described around the world, and Rhinonyssidae is the most diverse family. These mites are bloodsucking endoparasites that inhabit the respiratory system of birds. This study aimed to report on occurrences of nasal mites in Sternidae on the southern coast of Brazil. Of the 106 birds analyzed, 8.5% (9 birds) were parasitized by nasal mites. This report provides the first record in the Neotropical region for two mite species, Sternostoma boydi and Larinyssus orbicularis parasitizing Thalasseus acuflavidus and Sternula superciliaris. No nasal mites were found in Sterna trudeaui or Thalasseus maximus. One host individual (T. acuflavidus) was parasitized by two species of nasal mites, S. boydi and L. orbicularis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612017070DOI Listing
December 2018

Acuariidae (Nematoda) in Procellariiformes (Aves) on the southern coast of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2018 Jan-Mar;27(1):8-12. Epub 2018 Mar 5.

Laboratório de Fisiologia Aplicada a Aqüicultura, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Campus Universitário Capão do Leão, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Acuariidae nematodes are normally found in the digestive tract of aquatic birds, including Procellariiformes. Were examined Calonectris borealis (n = 4), Diomedea exulans (n = 1), Macronectes giganteus (n = 8), Thalassarche chlororhynchos (n = 5), Thalassarche melanophrys (n = 15), Procellaria aequinoctialis (n = 4), Puffinus gravis (n = 2) and Puffinus puffinus (n = 6), collected on the southern coast of RS, Brazil. A total of 16 birds (35.5%) were parasitized by two species of Acuariidae. Stegophorus diomedeae and Seuratia shipleyi were identified, with prevalences of 26.1% and 21.7%, respectively. Few studies on nematodes in Procellariiformes have been conducted. Here, the acuariids Seuratia shipleyi in Calonectris borealis and Procellaria aequinoctialis and Stegophorus diomedeae in Diomedea exulans, Procellaria aequinoctialis and Thalassarche chlororhynchos were reported for the first time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612017073DOI Listing
February 2019

Dioctophyme renale (Nematoda: Dioctophymatidae) in Leopardus geoffroyi (Carnivora: Felidae) in the Neotropical region.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2018 Apr-Jun;27(2):223-225. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto de Biologia - IB, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Parasitic diseases affecting wild carnivores remain largely unknown or poorly described. Dioctophymosis is a parasitosis caused by the nematode Dioctophyme renale that is found worldwide. It affects domestic and wild animals and has been reported frequently in Brazil. This paper reports dioctophymosis in a wild felid for the first time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s1984-29612017079DOI Listing
February 2019

n. sp. (Nematoda: Camallanidae) in (Duméril & Bibron, 1835) (Testudines: Emydidae) from Southern Brazil.

Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl 2017 Aug 18;6(2):108-114. Epub 2017 May 18.

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Universitário, caixa postal: 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

This paper describes a new species of found in the freshwater turtle Sixty hosts collected in Southern Brazil were examined. All hosts (100%) were parasitized by a new species of , which was described as n. sp. The new species differs from other species of freshwater turtles mainly because of the morphology of the right spicule, the number of male precloacal and postcloacal papillae, and the presence of "mucrons" in the female posterior extremity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijppaw.2017.04.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5447518PMC
August 2017

Morphological, molecular and phylogenetic analyses of Diplotriaena bargusinica Skrjabin, 1917 (Nematoda: Diplotriaenidae).

Parasitol Int 2017 Oct 24;66(5):555-559. Epub 2017 Apr 24.

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Universitário, Caixa postal: 354, CEP 96010-900 Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

The nematode Diplotriaena bargusinica is a bird air sac parasite, and its taxonomy is based mainly on morphological and morphometric characteristics. Increasing knowledge of genetic information variability has spurred the use of DNA markers in conjunction with morphological data for inferring phylogenetic relationships in different taxa. Considering the potential of molecular biology in taxonomy, this study presents the morphological and molecular characterization of D. bargusinica, and establishes the phylogenetic position of the nematode in Spirurina. Twenty partial sequences of the 18S region of D. bargusinica rDNA were generated. Phylogenetic trees were obtained through the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference methods where both had similar topology. The group Diplotriaenoidea is monophyletic and the topologies generated corroborate the phylogenetic studies based on traditional and previously performed molecular taxonomy. This study is the first to generate molecular data associated with the morphology of the species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2017.04.009DOI Listing
October 2017

Pathology and morphometry of Hystrichis acanthocephalicus (Nematoda) from Phimosus infuscatus (Pelecaniformes) in southern Brazil.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2017 Jan-Mar;26(1):34-38. Epub 2017 Jan 26.

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres - LAPASIL, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Campus Universitário Capão do Leão, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Species of Hystrichis are parasite nematodes of the digestive tract of aquatic birds in South America, Europe and Asia. In Brazil, Hystrichis acanthocephalicus has been reported in Phimosus infuscatus. There are few data on the morphometry of this species and there are no reports on pathological conditions that it causes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to report morphometric data from H. acanthocephalicus and describe the pathological effects of this parasite on the Phimosus infuscatus proventriculus. Thirty gastrointestinal tracts of P. infuscatus were examined to search for nematodes and H. acanthocephalicus occurred in 83% of hosts. Were measured the total length and body width of males and females, and of their respective cuticular spines, esophagus, spicules and eggs, and the internal and external diameter of copulatory bursa. Histopathological examination revealed parasitic structures in the proventriculus from the lumen (anterior end) to the outer layers of the organ (intermediate and posterior parts), in which we observed inflammatory reaction with infiltration of heterophils, hemorrhage and hemosiderin. The results of this study of histopathology, morphometry and parasitological indices are the first ones reported to H. acanthocephalicus and should contribute to the identification and recognition in cases of outbreaks in the Neotropical region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612016089DOI Listing
May 2018

Dioctophyme renale (Nematoda: Enoplida) in domestic dogs and cats in the extreme south of Brazil.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2017 Jan-Mar;26(1):119-121. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

Clínica Cirúrgica Veterinária, Departamento de Clínicas Veterinária, Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Dioctophyme renale is a zoonotic nematode that parasites the kidneys of wild and domestic carnivores, and it has been reported frequently in Brazil. The aim here was to register the number of cases of dogs and cats diagnosed with dioctophymosis by necropsy (1981 to 2014) and ultrasound examination (2010 to 2015) in Pelotas-RS. In this context, a survey was conducted on dioctophymosis cases diagnosed at the Veterinary Pathology Laboratory (LPV) and Veterinary Clinical Hospital (HCV) of the Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel), and at a specialist veterinary imaging diagnostics clinic. In total, 95 cases were registered. The high series of the disease in dogs can be related to the presence of a large number of stray and semi-domestic dogs in the city, and also due to the ingestion of intermediate hosts of D. renale parasitized with the infective larvae. Thus, it can be concluded that Pelotas is a city with favorable conditions for the occurrence of dioctophymosis with high rate of disease in recent years.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612016072DOI Listing
May 2018

First isolation of Dioctophyme renale eggs from an urban environment and identification of those from animal urine.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2017 Jan-Mar;26(1):89-91. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Dioctophyme renale is a zoonotic parasite with worldwide distribution, although its occurrence is little known. The objective here was to evaluate the presence of parasite eggs in the environment and in the urine of dogs and cats in an urban area. Soil samples and urine were evaluated respectively by means of the Caldwell-Caldwell technique and urinalysis. Out of the 100 soil samples, 3% presented D. renale eggs, and out of the 43 urine samples, 18.6% were positive, including the feline samples. Thus, D. renale eggs are present in the urban environment, and dogs and cats are parasitized by this nematode, which therefore represents a risk to public health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612016064DOI Listing
May 2018

Helminths of Molothrus bonariensis (Gmelin, 1789) (Passeriformes: Icteridae) from southernmost Brazil.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2016 Jul-Sep;25(3):279-85. Epub 2016 Aug 25.

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres - LAPASIL, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas - UFPel, Pelotas, RS, Brasil.

Information about helminths of Molothrus bonariensis (Gmelin, 1789) (Passeriformes: Icteridae) are scarce; in this sense the objective of this paper was to contribute to its knowledge. Five hosts of southern Brazil were examined and the helminths Prosthogonimus ovatus, Tanaisia valida (Digenea), Diplotriaena bargusinica and Synhimantus (Dispharynx) nasuta (Nematoda) were identified. The species T. valida, P. ovatus and S. (D.) nasuta are for the first time registered for the bird in Brazil. Prosthogonimus ovatus, T. valida, D. bargusinica e S. (D.) nasuta are first recorded in M. bonariensis in the southern Brazilian state Rio Grande do Sul.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612016042DOI Listing
May 2018

Chewing lice (Phthiraptera) from Calidris fuscicollis (Aves: Scolopacidae) in Southern Brazil.

Acta Trop 2014 Aug 15;136:101-3. Epub 2014 Apr 15.

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia (DEMP), Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), Brazil.

During April and September from 2010 to 2012, 80 birds of the species Calidris fuscicollis (white-rumped sandpiper) were collected for parasitological studies in the southern coast of Rio Grande do Sul, under ICMBIO license No. 26234-1. For ectoparasite collection, the birds were first submerged in water with detergent. The parasites found were fixed in 70% alcohol, cleared in 10% potassium hydroxide and mounted in Canada balsam. Of 80 birds examined, 79% were parasitized. Actornithophilus umbrinus (47.5%), Actornithophilus lacustris (37.5%), Actornithophilus spp. (13.75%), Carduiceps zonarius (26.25%), Lunaceps incoenis (27.5%), and Lunaceps spp. (16.25%) were the species found with their respective prevalence. We record for the first time parasitism by chewing lice in Calidris fuscicollis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2014.04.009DOI Listing
August 2014

Lagochilascariasis in cats (Felis catus domesticus) in southern Brazil.

J Feline Med Surg 2014 Dec 1;16(12):1007-9. Epub 2014 Apr 1.

Laboratory of Wild Animals Parasitology, Institute of Biology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil

Lagochilascariasis, a parasitic disease little known in Brazil, is caused by an ascarid nematode that has a peculiar life cycle, with a predilection site for the cervical region in the final hosts: humans, cats and dogs. We aimed to record the occurrence of Lagochilascaris minor in domestic cats from rural areas in the Municipality of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, with reports of clinical signs and the treatment applied.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1098612X14525386DOI Listing
December 2014

Parasitic helminths of the digestive system of wild boars bred in captivity.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2013 Jul-Sep;22(3):433-6

Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Biologia, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres, PelotasRS, Brasil.

This study aimed to identify the parasites that inhabit the digestive system of Sus scrofa scrofa from a commercial breeding facility in southern Brazil, and reports the first occurrence of Trichostrongylus colubriformis in wild boars. The gastrointestinal tracts of 40 wild boars from a commercial breeding facility were collected and individualized during slaughter in a cold-storage slaughterhouse. Out of this total, 87.5% were parasitized by the helminths Ascaris suum, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Oesophagostomum dentatum and Trichuris suis. T. colubriformis presented a prevalence of 45%, mean intensity of 28.4 and mean abundance of 12.8. The data from this study showed that T. colubriformis not only has a capacity to develop in the small intestines of wild boars, but also adapts well to animals raised in captivity, thus representing a possible cause of economic loss in commercial wild boar farming.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612013000300020DOI Listing
September 2014

Do patient-reported outcome measures capture functioning aspects and environmental factors important to individuals with injuries or disorders of the hand?

J Hand Ther 2013 Oct-Dec;26(4):332-42; quiz 342. Epub 2013 Aug 1.

Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (IBE), Chair for Public Health and Health Services Research, Research Unit for Biopsychosocial Health, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU), Munich, Germany; ICF Research Branch (in cooperation with the WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications in Germany (at DIMDI)), Switzerland.

Study Design: Qualitative study.

Introduction: Clinical outcome evaluation needs to consider the patient perspective for an in-depth understanding of functioning and disability.

Purpose Of The Study: To explore whether patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) used in the field of hand injuries or hand disorders, capture functioning aspects and environmental factors important to the patients.

Methods: We performed a qualitative study and a systematic literature review. The focus group sessions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and the identified concepts were linked to the ICF. We searched in MEDLINE for reviews, related to injuries or disorders of the hand, reporting on PROMs. We linked the items of the identified PROMs to the ICF and compared the qualitative data with the content of the PROMs.

Results: Statements from 45 individuals who participated in eight focus groups were linked to 97 categories of the ICF. From 15 reviews included, eight PROMs were selected. The selected PROMs capture 34 of the categories retrieved from the qualitative data.

Conclusions: PROMs used in the context of hand injuries or hand disorders capture only in parts the functioning aspects important to the patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2013.06.002DOI Listing
June 2014

Nematode parasites of Chelidae (Testudines) from southern Brazil.

Parasitol Res 2013 Sep 30;112(9):3365-8. Epub 2013 Jun 30.

Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Universitário, caixa postal: 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

The presence of helminths associated with freshwater turtles is rarely reported. There are no records of nematodes parasitizing Acanthochelys spixii, and for Hydromedusa tectifera, there is only the report of unidentified nematodes found in this species in Argentina. This is the first report of nematodes (Spiroxys contortus and Camallanus sp.) in A. spixii and the first record of Spiroxys contortus and Camallanus sp. in H. tectifera. This is the southernmost record of S . contortus because this nematode was previously recorded only in Mexico.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-013-3503-3DOI Listing
September 2013

Parasites of the respiratory tract of Sus scrofa scrofa (wild boar) from commercial breeder in southern Brazil and its relationship with Ascaris suum.

Parasitol Res 2013 Mar 6;112(3):1353-6. Epub 2012 Dec 6.

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Institute of Biology, Federal University of Pelotas, Capão do Leão, Brazil.

This study aimed to identify the species of helminths infecting the respiratory tract of Sus scrofa scrofa from commercial breeding and check the existence of a possible antagonistic relationship of these species with Ascaris suum. Forty wild boars were analyzed, and the genus Metastrongylus was recorded in the bronchi and bronchioles of 60 % of these, with the occurrence of the species Metastrongylus apri, Metastrongylus salmi, and Metastrongylus pudendotectus. The highest prevalence found was in M. apri (52.5 %), followed by M. salmi (20 %), and M. pudendotectus (7.5 %), registering the highest prevalence of Metastrongylus in wild boars from commercial breeding so far. M. apri was first reported parasitizing wild boars bred in captivity. There was no observed significant influence of A. suum in the mean intensity of Metastrongylus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-012-3214-1DOI Listing
March 2013

Helminths parasitizing Columbina picui (Columbiformes: Columbidae) in Brazil.

J Parasitol 2009 Aug;95(4):1011-2

Wild Fauna Rehabilitation Center (NURFS/CETAS), Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel), P.O. Box 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

Columbina picui (picui ground-dove) is a small, diurnal columbid bird that lives, in couples or flocks, in open areas in the countryside and urban centers. The species occurs in Brazil and other countries in South America. The aim of this study was to identify the helminths that parasitize C. picui in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Thirty-four specimens were necropsied; in each case, the organs were isolated and examined separately. The nematodes and their prevalences were: Ascaridia columbae (26.5%) and Ornithostrongylus iheringi (11.8%) in the small intestine; Dispharynx nasuta in the proventriculus (5.9%) and gizzard (2.9%); and a Dispharynx sp. (2.9%) in the proventriculus. This is the first report of D. nasuta parasitizing C. picui in Brazil and the first record of A. columbae and O. iheringi infecting C. picui in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1645/GE-1948.1DOI Listing
August 2009

[Ocurrence of Ornithonyssus bursa (Berlese, 1888) (Acari: Macronyssidae) on Megascops choliba (tropical screech-owl) and Pitangus sulphuratus (great kiskadee) nestlings in the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2009 Oct-Dec;18(4):69-70

Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Universitário, Pelotas, Brazil.

The Center for Rehabilitation of Wildlife and Center for Selection of Wild Animal of the Federal University of Pelotas has attended two nestlings of Megascops choliba (tropical screech-owl) (Strigiformes - Strigidae) and two of Pitangus sulphuratus (great kiskadee) (Passeriformes - Tyrannidae) heavily parasitized by mites, in May 2005 and December 2006, respectively. The nestlings and the nest of P. sulphuratus were collected in the Pelotas urban area after severe storms. The mites were removed, clarified in lactofenol, permanently mounted in Hoyer's medium and identified as Ornithonyssus bursa (Acari - Macronyssidae). Megascops choliba and Pitangus sulphuratus are reported as host of Ornithonyssus bursa in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4322/rbpv.01804013DOI Listing
July 2010

Biomphalaria molluscs (Gastropoda: Planorbidae) in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 2009 Aug;104(5):783-6

Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.

The present study was aimed at characterising Biomphalaria species using both morphological and molecular (PCR-RFLP) approaches. The specimens were collected in 15 localities in 12 municipalities of the southern region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The following species were found and identified: Biomphalaria tenagophila guaibensis, Biomphalaria oligoza and Biomphalaria peregrina. Specimens of the latter species were experimentally challenged with the LE Schistosoma mansoni strain, which showed to be refractory to infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0074-02762009000500020DOI Listing
August 2009

The helminth fauna of the red-crested cardinal (Paroaria coronata) Passeriformes: Emberizidae in Brazil.

Parasitol Res 2009 Oct 28;105(5):1359-63. Epub 2009 Jul 28.

Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Laboratório de Parasitologia de Animais Silvestres, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Universitário, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

With the objective of identifying the helminths of Paroaria coronata, 40 birds were necropsied, and their organs and contents were examined. The parasites were preserved in 70 masculineGL alcohol and prepared for identification using standard techniques. The helminth fauna found in P. coronata were Aproctella carinii, Dispharynx nasuta, Capillaria sp., Diplotriaena sp., Tanaisia oviaspera, Tanaisia valida, Tanaisia sp., Prosthogonimus ovatus, Orthoskrjabinia sp., and Mediorhynchus sp., with Nematoda being most represented, occurring in 22.5% of the birds. Besides being the first record of these helminths in P. coronata, this work also extends the area of occurrence of Orthoskrjabinia sp. for Brazil and of A. carinii, Diplotriaena sp., T. oviaspera, T. valida, and Mediorhynchus sp. for the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-009-1569-8DOI Listing
October 2009

[Helminths of Pampas fox, Pseudalopex gymnocercus (Fischer, 1814) and of Crab-eating fox, Cerdocyon thous (Linnaeus, 1766) in the South of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2008 Apr-Jun;17(2):87-92

Laboratório Regional de Diagnóstico, Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Caixa Posta 354, Brazil.

Forty wild canids were captured by live trap at Municipalities of Pedro Osorio and Pelotas in Southern of the State of Rio Grande do Sul and they were transported to the Parasitology Laboratory at the Universidade Federal de Pelotas. After they were posted, segments of intestinal, respiratory and urinary tracts and liver were separated and examined. Animal skulls were used for taxonomic identification. Of forty wild animals trapped, 22 (55%) were Pseudalopex gymnocercus and 22 (55%) Cerdocyon thous. The most prevalent nematodes were: Ancylostoma caninum (45.4 in P. gymnocercus and 22.2% in C. thous), Molineus felineus (9.9 in P. gymnocercus and 5.6% in C. thous), Strongyloides sp. (22.7 in P. gymnocercus and 16.7% in C. thous), Trichuris sp. (13.6 in P. gymnocercus and 11.1% in C. thous), and Capillaria hepatica (13.6 in P. gymnocercus and 5.5% in C. thous). The trematodes observed were: Alaria alata (36.4 in P. gymnocercus and 50.0% in C. thous), and Asthemia heterolecithodes in 5.6% C. thous. Cestodes were identified as Spirometra sp. (61.1% in C. thous and 54.5 in P. gymnocercus), Diphyllobothriidae, (81.8 in P. gymnocercus and 77.8% in C. thous) and an Acantocephala of the genus Centrorhynchus was also observed in 5.6% of C. thous only. These results indicated the helminths fauna in wild canids from the studied area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s1984-29612008000200005DOI Listing
January 2009

Genetic variability of Brazilian populations of Lymnaea columella (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae), an intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica (Trematoda: Digenea).

Acta Trop 2006 Mar 15;97(3):339-45. Epub 2006 Feb 15.

Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Laboratório de Helmintoses Intestinais, Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou-Fiocruz, Avenida Augusto de Lima 1715, Barro Preto MG 30190-002, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

In Brazil, Lymnaea columella is the most important intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, the etiological agent of fasciolosis, which is a parasitic disease of veterinarian and human importance. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to investigate the genetic variability within and among nine Brazilian populations of L. columella comprising 205 individuals. A number of four primers were used for analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Out of 83 RAPD markers, 63 (76%) were polymorphic and revealed 119 unique RAPD profiles. The levels of genetic variability found in the populations were low and most of the genetic variation was interpopulational (81.6%) when compared to intrapopulational variability (18.4%). These results are in accordance with the dynamics and distribution of the populations analyzed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2006.01.003DOI Listing
March 2006

The use of the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism technique associated with the classical morphology for characterization of Lymnaea columella, L. viatrix, and L. diaphana (Mollusca: Lymnaeidae).

Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 2004 Aug 3;99(5):503-7. Epub 2004 Nov 3.

Laboratório de Helmintoses Intestinais, Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou-Fiocruz, Av. Augusto de Lima 1715, 30190-002 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

The specific identification of Lymnaeid snails is based on a comparison of morphological characters of the shell, radula, renal and reproductive organs. However, the identification is complicated by dissection process, intra and interspecific similarity and variability of morphological characters. In the present study, polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques targeted to the first and second internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) rDNA and to the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal gene (16S rDNAmt) were used to differentiate the species Lymnaea columella, L. viatrix, and L. diaphana from some localities of Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay as well as to verify whether the molecular results corroborates the classical morphological method.PCR-RFLP analysis of the ITS1, ITS2, and 16S using 12 restriction enzymes revealed characteristic patterns for L. columella and L. diaphana which were concordant with the classical morphology. On the other hand, for L. viatrix populations a number of 1 to 6 profiles were generated while morphology provided the species pattern results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0074-02762004000500008DOI Listing
August 2004