Publications by authors named "Georgina Edwards"

4 Publications

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Prevalence of anxiety symptomatology and diagnosis in syndromic intellectual disability: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2022 07 2;138:104719. Epub 2022 Jun 2.

The School of Psychology, College of Health and Life Sciences, Aston University, UK. Electronic address:

Individuals with syndromic intellectual disability are at increased risk of experiencing anxiety. Comparing prevalence estimates of anxiety will allow the identification of at-risk groups and inform causal pathways of anxiety. No known study has explored estimates of anxiety symptomatology and diagnosis, including specific anxiety profiles, across groups whilst accounting for methodological quality of studies. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to fill this gap. Prior to review completion, methodology and analysis plans were registered and documented in a protocol (CRD42019123561). Data from 83 papers, involving a pooled sample of 13,708 across eight syndromes were synthesised using a random effects model. Anxiety prevalence ranged from 9 % (95 % CI: 4-14) in Down syndrome to 73% in Rett syndrome (95 % CI: 70-77). Anxiety prevalence across syndromic intellectual disability was higher than for intellectual disability of mixed aetiology and general population estimates. Substantial variability between syndromes identified groups at higher risk than others. The identification of high-risk groups is crucial for early intervention, allowing us to refine models of risk and identify divergent profiles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2022.104719DOI Listing
July 2022

Utilising Interview Methodology to Inform the Development of New Clinical Assessment Tools for Anxiety in Autistic Individuals Who Speak Few or no Words.

J Autism Dev Disord 2022 Mar 18. Epub 2022 Mar 18.

Department of Psychology, College of Health and Life Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, B4 7ET, UK.

Autistic individuals with intellectual disability who speak few or no words are at high risk of anxiety but are underrepresented in research. This study aimed to describe the presentation of anxiety in this population and discuss implications for the development of assessments. Interviews were conducted with 21 parents/carers of autistic individuals and nine clinicians. Data were analysed using content analysis and interpretative phenomenological analysis. Anxiety behaviours described by parents/carers included increased vocalisation, avoidance and behaviours that challenge. Changes to routine were highlighted as triggering anxiety. Clinicians discussed the importance of identifying an individual's baseline of behaviour, knowing an individual well and ruling out other forms of distress. This study raises considerations for early identification of anxiety and for subsequent support.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-022-05509-yDOI Listing
March 2022

Anxiety in autistic individuals who speak few or no words: A qualitative study of parental experience and anxiety management.

Autism 2021 02 1;25(2):429-439. Epub 2020 Oct 1.

Aston University, UK.

Lay Abstract: Anxiety is a common condition in autistic individuals, including those who also have an intellectual disability. Despite this, autistic individuals who have severe to profound intellectual disability, or use few or no words, are often excluded from autism research. There are also very few assessment tools and interventions with known effectiveness for autistic individuals with intellectual disability. In this study, we aimed to learn more about parent/carers experiences of recognising and managing anxiety in autistic individuals who use few or no words. We conducted semi-structured interviews with parents and carers to address three research questions: (1) what techniques and management strategies do parents describe for anxiety-related behaviour in their child; (2) how do communication difficulties impact parental understanding and management of anxiety provoking situations and behaviours; (3) what is the impact of anxiety-related behaviours on the quality of life of autistic individuals and their families? During the interviews, parents described difficulties recognising anxiety in their child, mostly due to reduced verbal language use and anxiety behaviours overlapping with other behaviours (e.g. autism characteristics). However, parents also described use of a number of management strategies, including some which overlap with components of evidence-based interventions for emotional and behavioural problems in autistic individuals (e.g. exposure/sensory calming). Despite this, parents reported that anxiety continues to have significant impact on quality of life. We will use the findings of this study to inform future research to develop assessment tools and interventions for anxiety in autistic individuals who use few or no words.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1362361320962366DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7874371PMC
February 2021

Open source tools for management and archiving of digital microscopy data to allow integration with patient pathology and treatment information.

Diagn Pathol 2013 Feb 12;8:22. Epub 2013 Feb 12.

Australian Breast Cancer Tissue Bank, University of Sydney at the Westmead Millennium Institute, Darcy Road, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia.

Background: Virtual microscopy includes digitisation of histology slides and the use of computer technologies for complex investigation of diseases such as cancer. However, automated image analysis, or website publishing of such digital images, is hampered by their large file sizes.

Results: We have developed two Java based open source tools: Snapshot Creator and NDPI-Splitter. Snapshot Creator converts a portion of a large digital slide into a desired quality JPEG image. The image is linked to the patient's clinical and treatment information in a customised open source cancer data management software (Caisis) in use at the Australian Breast Cancer Tissue Bank (ABCTB) and then published on the ABCTB website (http://www.abctb.org.au) using Deep Zoom open source technology. Using the ABCTB online search engine, digital images can be searched by defining various criteria such as cancer type, or biomarkers expressed. NDPI-Splitter splits a large image file into smaller sections of TIFF images so that they can be easily analysed by image analysis software such as Metamorph or Matlab. NDPI-Splitter also has the capacity to filter out empty images.

Conclusions: Snapshot Creator and NDPI-Splitter are novel open source Java tools. They convert digital slides into files of smaller size for further processing. In conjunction with other open source tools such as Deep Zoom and Caisis, this suite of tools is used for the management and archiving of digital microscopy images, enabling digitised images to be explored and zoomed online. Our online image repository also has the capacity to be used as a teaching resource. These tools also enable large files to be sectioned for image analysis.

Virtual Slides: The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/5330903258483934.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1746-1596-8-22DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3575263PMC
February 2013
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