Publications by authors named "George T O"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Understanding gender issues in Nigeria: the imperative for sustainable development.

Heliyon 2021 Jul 18;7(7):e07622. Epub 2021 Jul 18.

Department of Sociology, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria.

Whenever the term "Gender" is mentioned, many readily attribute it to the womenfolk who, in many societies, are challenged and often put in a disadvantaged position concerning the men. As a result, many women empowerment programs are being championed to cushion the effects of this subjugation on women. This paper attempts to look into gender and understand what has been in existence concerning gender roles, especially for females, and how it contributes to development. It is also important to note that development is not something that happens in space or the product of eventualities but a concrete phenomenon that requires all to achieve. There is a specific role to play by both men and women to attain African development. Therefore, gender issues with all that relates to it can impinge on societal development. The secondary data collection was used by empirically engaging literature and British council report in tracing how Gender inequality began to be perceived. The study applied the theory of recognition by Axel Honneth and the functionalist approach in explaining the issues of gender and how it can engender development if adequately handled. It was discovered that if both genders are correctly appreciated with each playing their role, not discriminating or demeaning any position, the resultant effect will not only result in development; instead, sustainable development will be attained.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2021.e07622DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8327645PMC
July 2021

Coronavirus pandemic and spirituality in southwest Nigeria: A sociological analysis.

Heliyon 2021 Mar 15;7(3):e06451. Epub 2021 Mar 15.

Department of Sociology, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria.

Introduction: The coronavirus pandemic outbreak is wreaking much havoc across the globe, with many nations shutting down their economy and social life with the hope of flattening the curve while health practitioners are also gearing efforts in providing a cure for it. Part of the coronavirus challenges is the various spiritual undertones attributed to it in many quarters. Hence, this study seeks to understand the various spiritual undertones attributed to the coronavirus incidence in southwest Nigeria.

Methodology: This paper examined the coronavirus pandemic and spirituality sociologically in southwest Nigeria, using secondary and primary data. Secondary data includes a review of literature, social media comments, official records, and newspaper reports. Primary data entails using google form (questionnaire) circulated via social media with 221 responses retrieved and analyzed using the frequency distribution tables and bar charts. Also, a one-sample t-test was used for further statistical analysis.

Results: Findings show that rather than attributing coronavirus incidence to spirituality alone, most of the respondents also see it as a public health concern, and precautionary measures should adhere. They see the government ban on social gathering, which affected the religious houses as the right thing to do and not solely targeted as religious houses. However, most believe that religious houses provide 'essential' emotional and spiritual support to the people. Respondents also believe they can get their healing from their place of worship even if infected with the coronavirus.

Conclusion: Based on the findings it was recommended that religious organizations should source valid data so that policy-makers can make informed decisions. Also, there is a need to have an accurate record of the number of infected persons and death rates to know the right time to ease lockdown and lift the social gathering measures. There should also be a place for easy and free testing for people. This will help the government ascertain the number of infected persons, reduce the associated fear with the pandemic, and lessen the people's economic, social, and religious effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2021.e06451DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7988278PMC
March 2021

Knowledge and Attitudes about Breast Cancer among Women: A Wake-Up Call in Nigeria.

Open Access Maced J Med Sci 2019 May 25;7(10):1700-1705. Epub 2019 May 25.

Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria.

Background: Preventable deaths resulting from the scourge of breast cancer has become alarming and worrisome in many societies in developing countries, including Nigeria. Of much concern is the fact that breast cancer has continued to claim the precious lives of young, middle-aged, old, educated and non-educated women irrespective of their religion, socio-economic background and socio-demographic characteristics.

Aim: This study attempts to ascertain the knowledge and attitudes of women to breast cancer in Ogun State, Nigeria.

Methods: The study adopts both primary and secondary data sources to examine the level of knowledge and attitude of women towards breast cancer with the view of suggesting probable solutions and recommendations for policy.

Results: The result indicates that the awareness about breast cancer is overwhelming but only few women know about mammography; women in older age are 0.193 times less likely to attend breast cancer screening (p=0.000). Older women with secondary education that are either self-employed outside the home or full-time housewives are unfavourably disposed to breast cancer screening.

Conclusion: The authors recommend that concerned stakeholders in the health sector and policy decision makers should intensify action on cancer programmes and campaigns that could target older women especially housewives and women in middle level education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2019.221DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560304PMC
May 2019

Cardiac output and urea kinetics in dialysis patients: evidence supporting the regional blood flow model.

Kidney Int 1996 Oct;50(4):1273-7

University of Illinois Collge of Medicine, VA Chicago (Westside) Medical Center, USA.

The regional blood flow model predicts that urea sequestration occurs in organs rather than cells, and that post-dialysis urea rebound is a function of both cardiac index (CI) and regional blood flow distribution to muscle. We measured cardiac output (CO) in 100 randomly selected dialysis patients using bioelectric impedance three times during a single dialysis. Mean CO was 5.8 +/- 2.1 liter/min and CI averaged 3.1 +/- 1.1 liter/min/M2. CI was negatively correlated with age (r = -0.48, P < 0.01). CI was strongly affected by vasodilator ingestion (yes, N = 36, CI = 3.5 +/- 1.2; no, N = 64, CI = 2.88 +/- 0.92, P < 0.006). CI was not associated with systolic, diastolic, or mean blood pressures, nor with Hct, although very few severely anemic patients were in the cohort. Repeat intra-dialytic CO measurements two to three months later in 15 patients with low CI (2.59 +/- 0.59 liter/min/M2) and in 13 patients with high CI (5.00 +/- 0.9, P < 0.001) during a urea kinetic modeling session including 30 minutes post-dialysis rebound, sampling showed highly reproducible values for CO, with a mean absolute value % difference between CO values measured several months apart of 9.0 +/- 17%, r = 0.92. Urea rebound expressed as the difference (delta Kt/V30) between equilibrated and single-pool Kt/V was lower in the high CI group (-0.099 +/- 0.07) than in the low CI group (-0.16 +/- 0.06, P = 0.026), and delta KT/V30 as well as delta Kt/V30 divided by K/V correlated with CI (r = 0.48 and 0.48, respectively, P < 0.01). The RBF model was used to compute a group mean predicted delta Kt/V30 for the low CI and high CI groups based on measured group mean values for CI and K/V. The predicted delta Kt/V30 values for the high CI group (-0.097) and the low CI group (-0.183) agreed closely with measured values. RBF modeled values of CO (7.46 +/- 2.96 liter/min) were not significantly different from impedance-derived CO (6.93 +/- 2.70 liter/min), and the two CO measures correlated significantly (r = 0.63, P = 0.0003). The results provide support for the regional blood flow model of urea kinetics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ki.1996.438DOI Listing
October 1996
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