Publications by authors named "Gelan Shamloul"

2 Publications

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An updated review of the sebaceous gland and its role in health and diseases Part 2: Pathophysiological clinical disorders of sebaceous glands.

Dermatol Ther 2021 03 19;34(2):e14862. Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Veterans Affairs Hospital and SUNY Downstate Dermatology Service, Brooklyn, New York, USA.

Sebaceous glands are sebum-secreting components of pilosebaceous units. In the second of this two-part series, we review the pathologies in which sebaceous glands are primarily and secondarily implicated. They are primarily involved in steatocystoma simplex and multiplex, sebaceous gland hyperplasia, sebaceoma, sebaceous adenoma, sebaceous carcinoma, nevus sebaceus, and folliculosebaceous cystic hamartoma. Sebaceous glands are secondarily involved in acne vulgaris, seborrheic dermatitis, and androgenic alopecia. Steatocystoma multiplex is a benign congenital anomaly presenting as yellow cysts primarily on the upper body. Sebaceous gland hyperplasia is characterized by yellow, telangiectatic papules with a central dell, and it can be treated with topical retinoids or surgical excision. Sebaceoma clinically presents on the head and neck region as a skin-colored nodule and can be distinguished by immunohistochemistry. Stains used in the diagnosis of sebaceous adenoma and carcinoma include epithelial membrane antigen and adipophilin immunoperoxidase. Surgical excision is the preferred treatment for sebaceoma, sebaceous adenoma, and sebaceous carcinoma. Excision is not always indicated for nevus sebaceus. Folliculosebaceous cystic hamartoma is a relatively rare condition exhibiting both epithelial and mesenchymal components. Patients with acne vulgaris commonly present with papules of closed and open comedones displaying hypercornification. Seborrheic dermatitis presents as sharply demarcated yellow or red patches or plaques; antifungal agents, corticosteroids, and combination antifungal/anti-inflammatory therapies are common treatment modalities. As a result of hair follicle miniaturization, females with androgenic alopecia present with diffuse hair thinning, while men tend to present with balding and hairline recession.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.14862DOI Listing
March 2021

An updated review of the sebaceous gland and its role in health and diseases Part 1: Embryology, evolution, structure, and function of sebaceous glands.

Dermatol Ther 2021 01 1;34(1):e14695. Epub 2021 Jan 1.

Veterans Affairs Hospital and SUNY Downstate Dermatology Service, Brooklyn, New York, USA.

Sebaceous glands are sebum-secreting components of pilosebaceous units. The embryological development of the sebaceous gland follows that of the hair follicle and epidermal tissue, beginning between weeks 13 and 16 of fetal development. New sebaceous glands do not normally develop following birth, but their size increases with age. Sebocytes express a multitude of hormone receptors and are heavily regulated to secrete sebum by androgens. There is a large increase of sebum excretion at birth and again at puberty, until approximately age 17. In adulthood, sebum production remains stable and declines to zero in postmenopausal women and in men aged 60-70. Besides the production and release of sebum, sebaceous glands function to lubricate the skin and hair, provide thermoregulation, and exhibit antimicrobial activity. Research has shown sebaceous glands to possess the cellular capability to transcribe genes necessary for androgen metabolism. Dysfunction of the sebaceous gland can be seen primarily in steatocystoma simplex and multiplex, sebaceous gland hyperplasia, sebaceoma, sebaceous adenoma, sebaceous carcinoma, nevus sebaceus, and folliculosebaceous cystic hamartoma. Sebaceous glands are secondarily involved in acne vulgaris, seborrheic dermatitis, and androgenic alopecia.
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January 2021
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