Publications by authors named "Gaylord Amani Ngaboyeka"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Minimum acceptable diet among children aged 6-23 months in South Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo: a community-based cross-sectional study.

BMC Pediatr 2021 05 19;21(1):239. Epub 2021 May 19.

Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.

Background: Suboptimal child nutrition remains the main factor underlying child undernutrition in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). This study aimed to assess the prevalence of minimum acceptable diet and associated factors among children aged 6-23 months old.

Methods: Community-based cross-sectional study including 742 mothers with children aged 6-23 months old was conducted in 2 Health Zones of South Kivu, Eastern DRC. WHO indicators of Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) regarding complementary feeding practices were used. Logistic regression analysis was used to quantify the association between sociodemographic indicators and adequate minimum acceptable diet for both univariate and multivariate analysis.

Results: Overall, 33% of infants had minimum acceptable diet. After controlling for a wide range of covariates, residence urban area (AOR 2.39; 95% CI 1.43, 3.85), attendance postnatal care (AOR 1.68; 95% CI 1.12, 2.97), education status of mother (AOR 1.83; 95% CI 1.20, 2.77) and household socioeconomic status (AOR 1.72; 95% CI 1.14, 2.59) were factors positively associated with minimum acceptable diet.

Conclusion: Actions targeting these factors are expected to improve infant feeding practices in South Kivu.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12887-021-02713-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8132412PMC
May 2021

Effects of probiotics and synbiotics on diarrhea in undernourished children: Systematic review with meta-analysis.

Clin Nutr 2021 May 25;40(5):3158-3169. Epub 2020 Dec 25.

Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium; Pediatric Infectious Diseases, General Pediatrics, Pediatric Department, Cliniques universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels, Belgium.

Background: Undernutrition predisposes children to a greater incidence and duration of diarrhea. No review and meta-analysis have yet been conducted to assess effectiveness of probiotics and synbiotics in undernourished children.

Aims: To assess the effectiveness of probiotics and synbiotics on diarrhea in undernourished children.

Methods: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials evaluating the effects of probiotics and synbiotics on diarrhea in undernourished children were searched from 1990 to May 2020. Recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement were followed.

Results: The systematic review identified 15 trials with 6986 patients. The meta-analysis revealed that treatment with probiotic or synbiotic reduced significantly both the duration of diarrhea [Weighted mean difference (WMD) = -1.05 day, 95% CI (-1.98, -0.11)] and the hospital stay duration [Standard mean difference (SMD) = -2.87 days, 95% CI (-5.33, -0.42)], especially in specific patient subsets. In both groups, similar rates of vomiting and nutritional recovery were observed. No probiotics or synbiotics-related adverse effects were reported. Subgroup analyses showed that probiotic and synbiotic treatment were more effective in reducing risk of diarrhea in outpatients [Risk ratio (RR) = 0.86, 95%CI (0.75-0.98)].

Conclusion: This meta-analysis supports the potential beneficial roles of probiotics and synbiotics on diarrhea in undernourished children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2020.12.026DOI Listing
May 2021

Severe acute malnutrition in children admitted in an Intensive Therapeutic and Feeding Centre of South Kivu, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo: Why do our patients die?

PLoS One 2020 17;15(7):e0236022. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.

Background: Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) remains a serious public health concern in low- and middle-income countries. Little is known about treatment outcomes of child inpatients in Intensive Therapeutic and Feeding Units. This study aimed to assess treatment outcomes of SAM and identify factors associated with mortality among children treated at Saint Joseph Nutritional Center, South Kivu, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

Methods: A retrospective hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted on medical records of 633 severely malnourished children followed as inpatients at Saint Joseph Nutritional Center from July 2017 to December 2018. Data were entered, thoroughly cleaned and analyzed in SPSS version 25. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression model were fitted to identify factors associated with mortality.

Results: Among 633 patients admitted with SAM, 13.1% were lost to follow-up and 9.2% died while in hospital. Children with late referral to the health facility (> 14 days) after the onset of main external malnutrition signs had 2.03 times higher odds of death than those referred less than 14 days [AOR = 2.03 at 95%CI (1.12, 3.68)]. The odds of death was 1.91 times higher for children with MUAC < 115 mm than for those with MUAC ≥ 115 mm [AOR = 1.91 at 95% CI (1.05, 3.50)]. Children infected with HIV were 3.90 times more likely to die compared to their counterparts [AOR = 3.90 at 95% CI (2.80, 9.41)].

Conclusion: Particular emphasis should be placed on partnering with communities to improve information on malnutrition signs and on critical importance of early referral to the health system. While HIV incidence in DRC is still low (0.21%), its impact on mortality among severely malnourished children is increased due to the limited access to HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0236022PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7367457PMC
September 2020
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