Publications by authors named "Gaohaer Kadeerhan"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Proteomic profiling identifies signatures associated with progression of precancerous gastric lesions and risk of early gastric cancer.

EBioMedicine 2021 Nov 21;74:103714. Epub 2021 Nov 21.

State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing Proteome Research Center, National Center for Protein Sciences (Beijing), Beijing Institute of Lifeomics, Beijing 102206, China. Electronic address:

Background: Molecular features underlining the multistage progression of gastric lesions and development of early gastric cancer (GC) are poorly understood, restricting the ability to GC prevention and management.

Methods: We portrayed proteomic landscape and explored proteomic signatures associated with progression of gastric lesions and risk of early GC. Tissue proteomic profiling was conducted for a total of 324 subjects. A case-control study was performed in the discovery stage (n=169) based on populations from Linqu, a known high-risk area for GC in China. We then conducted two-stage validation, including a cohort study from Linqu (n = 56), with prospective follow-up for progression of gastric lesions (280-473 days), and an independent case-control study from Beijing (n = 99).

Findings: There was a clear distinction in proteomic features for precancerous gastric lesions and GC. We derived four molecular subtypes of gastric lesions and identified subtype-S4 with the highest progression risk. We found 104 positively-associated and 113 inversely-associated proteins for early GC, with APOA1BP, PGC, HPX and DDT associated with the risk of gastric lesion progression. Integrating these proteomic signatures, the ability to predict progression of gastric lesions was significantly strengthened (areas-under-the-curve=0.88 (95%CI: 0.78-0.99) vs. 0.56 (0.36-0.76), Delong's P = 0.002). Immunohistochemistry assays and examination at mRNA level validated the findings for four proteins.

Interpretation: We defined proteomic signatures for progression of gastric lesions and risk of early GC, which may have translational significance for identifying particularly high-risk population and detecting GC at an early stage, improving potential for targeted GC prevention.

Funding: The funders are listed in the Acknowledgement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2021.103714DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8617343PMC
November 2021

Identification and Validation of Plasma Metabolomic Signatures in Precancerous Gastric Lesions That Progress to Cancer.

JAMA Netw Open 2021 Jun 1;4(6):e2114186. Epub 2021 Jun 1.

Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing, China.

Importance: Metabolic deregulation plays an important role in gastric cancer (GC) development. To date, no studies have comprehensively explored the metabolomic profiles along the cascade of gastric lesions toward GC.

Objective: To draw a metabolic landscape and define metabolomic signatures associated with the progression of gastric lesions and risk of early GC.

Design, Setting, And Participants: A 2-stage, population-based cohort study was initiated in 2017 in Linqu County, Shandong Province, China, a high-risk area for GC. Prospective follow-up was conducted during the validation stage (June 20, 2017, to May 27, 2020). A total of 400 individuals were included based on the National Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer Early Detection Program in China. The discovery stage involved 200 individuals with different gastric lesions or GC (high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia or invasive GC). The validation stage prospectively enrolled 152 individuals with gastric lesions who were followed up for 118 to 1063 days and 48 individuals with GC.

Exposures: Metabolomic profiles and metabolite signatures were examined based on untargeted plasma metabolomics assay.

Main Outcomes And Measures: The risk of GC overall and early GC (high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia), and progression of gastric lesions.

Results: Of the 400 participants, 124 of 200 (62.0%) in the discovery set were men; mean (SD) age was 56.8 (7.5) years. In the validation set, 136 of 200 (68.0%) were men; mean (SD) age was 57.5 (8.1) years. Distinct metabolomic profiles were noted for gastric lesions and GC. Six metabolites, including α-linolenic acid, linoleic acid, palmitic acid, arachidonic acid, sn-1 lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC)(18:3), and sn-2 LysoPC(20:3) were significantly inversely associated with risk of GC overall and early GC (high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia). Among these metabolites, the first 3 were significantly inversely associated with gastric lesion progression, especially for the progression of intestinal metaplasia (α-linolenic acid: OR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18-0.98; linoleic acid: OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.19-1.00; and palmitic acid: OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.13-0.78). Compared with models including only age, sex, Helicobacter pylori infection, and gastric histopathologic findings, integrating these metabolites significantly improved the performance for predicting the progression of gastric lesions (area under the curve [AUC], 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70-1.00 vs AUC, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.50-0.88; P = .02) and risk of early GC (AUC, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.58-1.00 vs AUC, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.31-0.91; P = .03).

Conclusions And Relevance: This study defined metabolite signatures that might serve as meaningful biomarkers for assessing high-risk populations and early diagnosis of GC, possibly advancing targeted GC prevention and control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.14186DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8220475PMC
June 2021

Microbiota alteration at different stages in gastric lesion progression: a population-based study in Linqu, China.

Am J Cancer Res 2021 1;11(2):561-575. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute Beijing, China.

In addition to Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori), gastric microbiota may be involved in carcinogenesis process. However, the longitudinal study to assess changes in the gastric microbiota associated with the development of gastric carcinogenesis is still limited. The aim of this study is to explore dynamic microbial alterations in gastric cancer (GC) development based on a 4-year endoscopic follow-up cohort in Linqu County, China. Microbial alterations were investigated by deep sequencing of the microbial 16S ribosomal RNA gene in 179 subjects with various gastric lesions, and validated in paired gastric biopsies prospectively collected before and after lesion progression and in non-progression controls. Significant differences were found in microbial diversity and community structure across various gastric lesions, with 62 candidate differential taxa between at least two lesion groups. Further validations identified Helicobacter, Bacillus, Capnocytophaga and Prevotella to be associated with lesion progression-to-dysplasia (DYS)/GC (all P < 0.05), especially for subjects progressing from intestinal metaplasia (IM) to DYS/GC. The combination of the four genera in a microbial dysbiosis index showed a significant difference after lesion progression-to-DYS/GC compared to controls (P = 0.027). The panel including the four genera identified subjects after progression-to-DYS/GC with an area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) of 0.941. Predictive significance was found before lesion progression-to-DYS/GC with an AUC = 0.776 and an even better AUC (0.927) for subjects progressing from IM to DYS/GC. Microbiota may play different roles at different stages in gastric carcinogenesis. A panel of bacterial genera associated with gastric lesions may help to assess gastric microbial dysbiosis and show potential predictive values for lesion progression. Our findings provide new clues for the microbial mechanism of H.pylori-associated carcinogenesis.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7868750PMC
February 2021
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