Publications by authors named "Gamze Aksu"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

In regard to Kennedy et al.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2014 Jul;89(4):928

Medical Faculty, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2014.04.016DOI Listing
July 2014

Commentary on "late bone and soft tissue sequelae of childhood radiotherapy".

Strahlenther Onkol 2014 Oct 3;190(10):962. Epub 2014 Jun 3.

Medical Faculty, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey,

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00066-014-0691-4DOI Listing
October 2014

The results of adjuvant radiotherapy in endometrial carcinoma.

Gynecol Endocrinol 2010 Apr;26(4):240-5

Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey.

Aim: To examine the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes in patients with endometrial cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy.

Methods: A total of 157 patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (RT) between 1999 and 2008 were evaluated, retrospectively. The mean age was 59 years (34-82). All patients received RT following surgery. Stage distribution was as follows: 92 patients (59%) stage I, 21 patients (13%) stage II, and 44 patients (28%) stage III.

Results: Overall survival rate was 95% at 2 years and 84% at 5 years. By the end of follow up, 135 patients (86%) were disease-free, and 4 (2%) were alive with disease. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified stage, grade, and serosal involvement as significant predictors for overall survival.

Conclusion: The results of our study suggests that early stage, low-grade endometrial cancer with no serosal involvement is associated with a better survival and adjuvant radiotherapy is a well tolerated and effective therapeutic option.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09513590903225341DOI Listing
April 2010

Radiotherapy-induced decreases in substance P levels may potentiate melanoma growth.

Mol Med Rep 2009 Mar-Apr;2(2):319-26

Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University, School of Medicine, Antalya 07070, Turkey.

Substance P, a member of the tachykinin family, is expressed in primary invasive malignant melanomas, metastatic melanomas, melanomas in situ, atypical naevi, and spindle and epithelioid cell naevi. The role of substance P in cancer development and progression is not clear. Radiotherapy, which is used extensively in the treatment of malignancies, alters substance P levels. It is, however, not known whether radiotherapy affects substance P levels in melanomas or in the tumor microenvironment. Given the fact that melanomas express substance P, possible radiation-induced changes in substance P content may underlie their radio-resistance. Hence, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of radiotherapy on the growth of B16F10 melanomas as well as on the tumor and systemic expression of substance P. In vivo exposure of tumor-bearing C5BL/6 mice to ionizing radiation (45 Gy administered in three fractions) arrested tumor growth for three weeks and induced 3-fold increases in survival, as well as decreasing substance P levels in primary tumors and the surrounding skin. Although radiotherapy was applied locally (1 x 1 cm) at the mid-flank region of the animal, it also induced systemic changes in the levels of substance P. Specifically, radiotherapy decreased substance P levels in skin distant from the radiation field as well as in the lungs and adrenals. In order to understand the significance of this effect, B16F10 cells and cells made from metastatic lesions (B16LNAD cells) were treated with substance P. Substance P inhibited the growth of B16F10 and B16LNAD cells and further potentiated the inhibitory effects of radiotherapy. These findings demonstrate for the first time that substance P inhibits melanoma growth, and that radiotherapy-induced decreases in substance P levels may underlie the radio-resistance of melanomas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mmr_00000103DOI Listing
October 2012

[Treatment modalities of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma].

Kulak Burun Bogaz Ihtis Derg 2008 Jul-Aug;18(4):263-7

Department of Radiation Oncology, Medicine Faculty of Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey.

Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare, benign vascular tumor originating from the sphenopalatine foramen. It primarily affects adolescent males. Due to its propensity to locally destructive growth, the tumor may lead to fatal epistaxis, intracranial extension, and life-threatening complications such as intraoperative hemorrhage. Many treatment modalities have been used for the management of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, but surgery and external beam radiation therapy have proved to be the only effective treatment modalities with acceptable morbidity. While endoscopic surgery provides successful results for early stage tumors, recent technological advances in radiotherapy offer significant advantages in advanced and recurrent tumors.
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August 2010

Patterns of care for lung cancer in radiation oncology departments of Turkey.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2008 Dec 15;72(5):1530-7. Epub 2008 Aug 15.

Dokuz Eylul University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir, Turkey.

Purpose: To determine the patterns of care for lung cancer in Turkish radiation oncology centers.

Methods And Materials: Questionnaire forms from 21 of 24 (87.5%) centers that responded were evaluated.

Results: The most frequent histology was non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (81%). The most common postoperative radiotherapy (RT) indications were close/(+) surgical margins (95%) and presence of pN2 disease (91%). The most common indications for postoperative chemotherapy (CHT) were ">/= IB" disease (19%) and the presence of pN2 disease (19%). In Stage IIIA potentially resectable NSCLC, the most frequent treatment approach was neoadjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) (57%). In Stage IIIA unresectable and Stage IIIB disease, the most frequent approach was definitive concomitant CHRT (91%). In limited SCLC, the most common treatment approach was concomitant CHRT with cisplatin+etoposide for cycles 1-3, completion of CHT to cycles 4-6, and finally prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with complete response (71%). Six cycles of cisplatin + etoposide CHT and palliative thoracic RT, when required, was the most commonly used treatment (81%) in extensive SCLC. Sixty-two percent of centers did not have endobronchial brachytherapy (EBB) facilities.

Conclusion: There is great variation in diagnostic testing, treatment strategies, indications for postoperative RT and CHT, RT features, and EBB availability for LC cases. To establish standards, national guidelines should be prepared using a multidisciplinary approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.03.035DOI Listing
December 2008

Stage I small cell carcinoma of the endometrium: survival and management options.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2008 ;87(1):122-6

1Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Antalya, 07070, Turkey.

Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium is a rare but aggressive disease with early systemic involvement. Patient survival is short. To date, no effective treatment protocol has been established. Surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have been used either alone or in combination. The case of a patient with stage IB endometrial SCC is presented with an overview based on all reported cases of SCC of the endometrium and its treatment with particular reference to stage I cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016340701709307DOI Listing
January 2008

Small cell carcinoma of the cervix: a case report.

Arch Gynecol Obstet 2008 Apr 9;277(4):367-70. Epub 2007 Sep 9.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University, School of Medicine, 07070, Antalya, Turkey.

Small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix accounts for 1-3% of all cervix cancers. It is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis. To date, no effective treatment protocol has been determined. Surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have been used either alone or in combination. Recent data suggests that survival in patients with early staged small cell carcinoma of the cervix is better with surgery combined with chemo-radiotherapy. Here, we presented two patients with stage IB1 small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. For both patients, definitive surgery was performed with pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. Subsequently, they were treated with pelvic external radiotherapy and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy with concurrent cisplatin based chemotherapy. They were alive with no evidence of disease at 91 and 65 months, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00404-007-0463-9DOI Listing
April 2008

Primary follicular lymphoma of the cervix uteri: a review.

Ann Hematol 2007 Sep 22;86(9):623-30. Epub 2007 Jun 22.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University, School of Medicine, Antalya 07070, Turkey.

Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the cervix is a rare disease, of which a subgroup of follicular lymphoma constitutes only 8.5%. There is not an established treatment protocol neither for primary cervical lymphoma nor for its follicular subgroup. We presented a case with Ann Arbor stage IEA (Extra-nodal involvement and absence of weight loss, fever, night sweat) primary follicular lymphoma of the cervix. She was treated with chemotherapy followed by pelvic radiotherapy. Upon relapse with a nodal neck mass, she was treated with rituximab alone. She remained well for 23 months after rituximab. In the 39 months of follow-up, there was no evidence of disease. In the light of our case, we reviewed the reported cases of primary follicular lymphoma of the cervix while discussing their treatment protocols and the cases of primary cervix lymphoma treated with rituximab.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-007-0328-0DOI Listing
September 2007