Publications by authors named "Gaku Minase"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Genetic abnormalities in a large cohort of Coffin-Siris syndrome patients.

J Hum Genet 2019 Dec 17;64(12):1173-1186. Epub 2019 Sep 17.

Asahikawa-Kosei General Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan.

Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS, MIM#135900) is a congenital disorder characterized by coarse facial features, intellectual disability, and hypoplasia of the fifth digit and nails. Pathogenic variants for CSS have been found in genes encoding proteins in the BAF (BRG1-associated factor) chromatin-remodeling complex. To date, more than 150 CSS patients with pathogenic variants in nine BAF-related genes have been reported. We previously reported 71 patients of whom 39 had pathogenic variants. Since then, we have recruited an additional 182 CSS-suspected patients. We performed comprehensive genetic analysis on these 182 patients and on the previously unresolved 32 patients, targeting pathogenic single nucleotide variants, short insertions/deletions and copy number variations (CNVs). We confirmed 78 pathogenic variations in 78 patients. Pathogenic variations in ARID1B, SMARCB1, SMARCA4, ARID1A, SOX11, SMARCE1, and PHF6 were identified in 48, 8, 7, 6, 4, 1, and 1 patients, respectively. In addition, we found three CNVs including SMARCA2. Of particular note, we found a partial deletion of SMARCB1 in one CSS patient and we thoroughly investigated the resulting abnormal transcripts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s10038-019-0667-4DOI Listing
December 2019

Mutations in PIGB Cause an Inherited GPI Biosynthesis Defect with an Axonal Neuropathy and Metabolic Abnormality in Severe Cases.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 08 27;105(2):384-394. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Department of Paediatric Neurology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK.

Proteins anchored to the cell surface via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) play various key roles in the human body, particularly in development and neurogenesis. As such, many developmental disorders are caused by mutations in genes involved in the GPI biosynthesis and remodeling pathway. We describe ten unrelated families with bi-allelic mutations in PIGB, a gene that encodes phosphatidylinositol glycan class B, which transfers the third mannose to the GPI. Ten different PIGB variants were found in these individuals. Flow cytometric analysis of blood cells and fibroblasts from the affected individuals showed decreased cell surface presence of GPI-anchored proteins. Most of the affected individuals have global developmental and/or intellectual delay, all had seizures, two had polymicrogyria, and four had a peripheral neuropathy. Eight children passed away before four years old. Two of them had a clinical diagnosis of DOORS syndrome (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures), a condition that includes sensorineural deafness, shortened terminal phalanges with small finger and toenails, intellectual disability, and seizures; this condition overlaps with the severe phenotypes associated with inherited GPI deficiency. Most individuals tested showed elevated alkaline phosphatase, which is a characteristic of the inherited GPI deficiency but not DOORS syndrome. It is notable that two severely affected individuals showed 2-oxoglutaric aciduria, which can be seen in DOORS syndrome, suggesting that severe cases of inherited GPI deficiency and DOORS syndrome might share some molecular pathway disruptions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.05.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6698938PMC
August 2019

Comprehensive analysis of coding variants highlights genetic complexity in developmental and epileptic encephalopathy.

Nat Commun 2019 06 7;10(1):2506. Epub 2019 Jun 7.

Department of Human Genetics, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, 236-0004, Japan.

Although there are many known Mendelian genes linked to epileptic or developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (EE/DEE), its genetic architecture is not fully explained. Here, we address this incompleteness by analyzing exomes of 743 EE/DEE cases and 2366 controls. We observe that damaging ultra-rare variants (dURVs) unique to an individual are significantly overrepresented in EE/DEE, both in known EE/DEE genes and the other non-EE/DEE genes. Importantly, enrichment of dURVs in non-EE/DEE genes is significant, even in the subset of cases with diagnostic dURVs (P = 0.000215), suggesting oligogenic contribution of non-EE/DEE gene dURVs. Gene-based analysis identifies exome-wide significant (P = 2.04 × 10) enrichment of damaging de novo mutations in NF1, a gene primarily linked to neurofibromatosis, in infantile spasm. Together with accumulating evidence for roles of oligogenic or modifier variants in severe neurodevelopmental disorders, our results highlight genetic complexity in EE/DEE, and indicate that EE/DEE is not an aggregate of simple Mendelian disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10482-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6555845PMC
June 2019

Human male infertility and its genetic causes.

Reprod Med Biol 2017 04 26;16(2):81-88. Epub 2017 Mar 26.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Asahikawa Medical University Asahikawa Japan.

Background: Infertility affects about 15% of couples who wish to have children and half of these cases are associated with male factors. Genetic causes of azoospermia include chromosomal abnormalities, Y chromosome microdeletions, and specific mutations/deletions of several Y chromosome genes. Many researchers have analyzed genes in the AZF region on the Y chromosome; however, in 2003 the gene on chromosome 12 (12q23) was identified as causing azoospermia by meiotic arrest through a point mutation.

Methods: We mainly describe the and genes that we have studied in our laboratory, and add comments on other genes associated with human male infertility.

Results: Up to now, The 17 genes causing male infertility by their mutation have been reported in human.

Conclusions: Infertility caused by nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) is very important in the field of assisted reproductive technology. Even with the aid of chromosomal analysis, ultrasonography of the testis, and detailed endocrinology, only MD-TESE can confirm the presence of immature spermatozoa in the testes. We strongly hope that these studies help clinics avoid ineffective MD-TESE procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rmb2.12017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5661822PMC
April 2017

An atypical case of SPG56/CYP2U1-related spastic paraplegia presenting with delayed myelination.

J Hum Genet 2017 Nov 20;62(11):997-1000. Epub 2017 Jul 20.

Department of Human Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a neurological disorder characterized by a progressive spasticity and muscle weakness of the lower limbs. It is divided into two subtypes, uncomplicated and complicated forms. Biallelic mutations in the cytochrome P450 2U1 gene (CYP2U1) are associated with spastic paraplegia type 56 (SPG56), manifesting both uncomplicated and complicated HSP. Accompanying clinical features include intellectual disability, dystonia, cerebellar ataxia, subclinical peripheral neuropathy, visual impairment, as well as abnormalities in brain magnetic resonance imaging. As a rare clinical feature, delayed myelination has previously been reported in only two patients with CYP2U1 mutations. Here, we report a patient with SPG56 with novel compound heterozygous mutations in CYP2U1 which were identified by whole exome sequencing. Our patient exhibited complex features together with delayed myelination, broadening the phenotypic spectrum of SPG56, and implying that CYP2U1 should be screened in HSP with delayed myelination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jhg.2017.77DOI Listing
November 2017

Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the human RAD21L gene may be a genetic risk factor for Japanese patients with azoospermia caused by meiotic arrest and Sertoli cell-only syndrome.

Hum Fertil (Camb) 2017 Sep 21;20(3):217-220. Epub 2017 Feb 21.

a Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , School of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University , Asahikawa , Japan.

Genetic mechanisms are implicated in some cases of male infertility. Recently, it was demonstrated that male mice lacking the gene for RAD21L exhibited azoospermia caused by meiotic arrest. Mouse RAD21L is a functionally relevant meiotic α-kleisin that is essential for male fertility. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAD21L mutations or polymorphisms may be associated with male infertility, especially azoospermia secondary to meiotic arrest. To determine if RAD21L defects are associated with azoospermia in groups of patients with meiotic arrest, we performed direct sequencing of the RAD21L coding regions in 38 Japanese patients with meiotic arrest and in 200 normal controls. Three coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP1-SNP3) were detected in the meiotic arrest patient group. Sertoli cell-only syndrome is considered a common cause of non-obstructive azoospermia. For comparison, the RAD21L coding regions in which SNP1-SNP3 were detected were sequenced in 140 patients with Sertoli cell-only syndrome. Statistical analyses were used to compare the two groups of patients with the control group. Genotype and allele frequencies of SNP2 and SNP3 were notably higher in the two patient groups compared with the control group (Bonferroni adjusted p value <0.016). These results suggest a critical role for RAD21L in human spermatogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14647273.2017.1292004DOI Listing
September 2017

Prenatal diagnosis of a body stalk anomaly by a combination of ultrasonography and foetal magnetic resonance imaging.

J Obstet Gynaecol 2017 Oct 3;37(7):946-947. Epub 2017 May 3.

a Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , Asahikawa Medical University , Asahikawa , Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443615.2017.1306842DOI Listing
October 2017

Male infertility and its genetic causes.

J Obstet Gynaecol Res 2015 Oct 14;41(10):1501-5. Epub 2015 Jul 14.

Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan.

Aim: Infertility is a serious social problem in advanced nations, with male factor infertility accounting for approximately half of all cases of infertility. Here, we aim to discuss our laboratory results in the context of recent literature on critical genes residing on the Y chromosome or autosomes that play important roles in human spermatogenesis.

Methods: The PubMed database was systematically searched using the following keywords: 'genetics of male factor infertility'; 'male infertility genes', 'genetics of spermatogenesis' to retrieve information for this review.

Results: Striking progress has recently been made in the elucidation of mechanisms of spermatogenesis using knockout mouse models. This information has, in many cases, not been directly translatable to humans. Nevertheless, mutations in several critical genes have been shown to cause male infertility. We discuss here the contribution to male factor infertility of a number of genes identified in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region on the Y chromosome, as well as the autosomally located genes: SYKP3, KLHL10, AURKC and SPATA16.

Conclusions: Non-obstructive azoospermia is the most severe form of azoospermia. However, the presence of spermatozoa can only be confirmed through procedures, which may prove to be unnecessary. Elucidation of the genes underlying male factor infertility, and thereby a better understanding of the mechanisms that cause it, will result in more tailored, evidence-based decisions in treatment of patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jog.12765DOI Listing
October 2015