Publications by authors named "Gabrielle N Pfund"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Associations between Trauma during Adolescence and Sense of Purpose in Middle-to-Late Adulthood.

Int J Behav Dev 2020 Sep 13;44(5):441-446. Epub 2020 Jan 13.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.

Early adverse experiences can hold lasting influence on later life outcomes, particularly during formative developmental periods such as adolescence. The current study evaluates the impact of different kinds of adolescent trauma on later sense of purpose in adulthood, using data from the Hawaii Longitudinal Study of Personality and Health. Participants ( = 545) retrospectively reported three kinds of trauma during adolescence: 1) non-betrayal trauma, such as a natural disaster; 2) low betrayal trauma, such as being abused by a stranger; and 3) high betrayal trauma, such as being abused by a relative. At a later assessment, participants ( = 60.15, = 1.96) reported their sense of purpose. Trauma scores were uncorrelated with sense of purpose for the overall sample. However, the associations differed when comparing two of the largest cultural groups in the sample, Japanese-Americans and Native Hawaiians. For participants who identified as Japanese-American, trauma scores held a negative association with later sense of purpose across multiple measures. Results are discussed with respect to how early life experiences differentially impact purpose development across individuals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025419896864DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7983047PMC
September 2020

When the end feels near: sense of purpose predicts well-being as a function of future time perspective.

Aging Ment Health 2021 Mar 1:1-11. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.

Objectives: While sense of purpose is a robust predictor of well-being, little work has considered whether the associations vary based on future time perspective. Exploring this possibility is important given that the extent to which one may pursue their life aims could be dependent upon how much time they feel that they have remaining.

Methods: Using three samples (total  = 2333), the current study considered the association between sense of purpose and future time perspective. Moderation tests also examined whether the associations between sense of purpose and three well-being components (positive affect, negative affect, life satisfaction) differed as a function of future time perspective.

Results: Across all three studies, people with a broader time perspective reported a higher sense of purpose. Both constructs predicted greater well-being, even after accounting for chronological age. Future time perspective moderated the associations between sense of purpose and well-being, such that the negative association between sense of purpose and negative affect was stronger for those with a broader time perspective and the positive association between sense of purpose and life satisfaction was stronger for those with a limited time perspective.

Conclusion: The well-being benefits associated with sense of purpose in adulthood may depend on future time perspective. Findings are discussed in the context of how purpose can be harnessed to enhance well-being even when older adults feel that their time left is limited.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2021.1891203DOI Listing
March 2021

Video chatting and appearance satisfaction during COVID-19: Appearance comparisons and self-objectification as moderators.

Int J Eat Disord 2020 12 21;53(12):2038-2043. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Social Science Division, Pepperdine University, Malibu, California, USA.

Objective: As video chatting has emerged as a leading form of communication for work, education, and socialization during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to investigate the association between video chatting and appearance satisfaction.

Method: Participants included women from the United States (n = 438; age: M = 31.3, SD = 12.71) who completed measures examining their use of video chatting services, self-objectification, video chatting appearance comparison, and appearance satisfaction.

Results: The total time spent on video chatting services was not associated with appearance satisfaction; however, self-objectification moderated the relationship between total hours of video chatting and appearance satisfaction. In addition, participants who engaged in more video chatting appearance comparisons reported lower face and body satisfaction. Furthermore, video chatting appearance comparison was associated with more frequent usage of certain Zoom features, such as the "touch up my appearance" feature, and more time spent looking at oneself on video calls. Finally, those who spent more time engaged with their families over video chatting services reported greater face and body satisfaction.

Discussion: The results of the current study demonstrate that time spent video chatting is not predictive of appearance satisfaction, but that self-objectification can exacerbate these associations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23393DOI Listing
December 2020

Attaching a new perspective to the associations between marriage and immune functioning: Comment on Kiecolt-Glaser (2018).

Am Psychol 2020 01;75(1):108-110

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Comments on an article by J. K. Kiecolt-Glaser (see record 2018-62311-007). Kiecolt-Glaser (2018) provided a valuable review of how negative relationship behaviors can impact immune system functioning. However, by considering how dispositional characteristics may impact the literature linking romantic relationships to immune system changes, one may take a new perspective on her review. This comment provides an overview of how individual differences in attachment may be used to predict immune system functioning, as well as the relationship behaviors that are said to initiate changes to the immune system. We conclude by outlining the ways in which Kiecolt-Glaser's review can be used to advance research examining the links between attachment and health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000491DOI Listing
January 2020