Publications by authors named "Gabriela Pereira de Oliveira Lira"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of somatic tissue cryopreservation on puma (Puma concolor L, 1771) tissue integrity and cell preservation after in vitro culture.

Cryobiology 2021 Jun 10. Epub 2021 Jun 10.

Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Federal Rural University of Semi-Arid (UFERSA), Mossoro, RN, Brazil. Electronic address:

Somatic resource banks play a crucial role in the conservation of genetic diversity, allowing for the preservation of biological samples from different populations. Puma somatic cells can be recovered from these banks and used in assisted techniques toward enhancing their multiplication and conservation. In response to the population reduction of this ecologically importance species, we aimed to evaluate the capacity of cryopreservation of somatic tissues on the maintenance of the integrity and quality of the cells recovered after culture, with the aim of establishing a somatic tissue bank that will allow for the safeguarding of a wide genetic sampling of pumas. Cryopreservation increased the thickness of the corneum layer in the tissues, and the number of perinuclear halos and empty gaps. Nevertheless, cryopreservation was able to maintain normal fibroblast patterns, even showing an increase in the percentage of collagen fibers. Cryopreservation maintained the proliferative potential of the tissues and the parameters evaluated during in vitro culture, mainly regarding the viability, proliferative activity, and apoptosis levels. Nevertheless, cells from cryopreserved tissues showed decreased metabolism and mitochondrial membrane potential when compared to cells from non-cryopreserved tissues. In summary, we demonstrated for the first time that puma somatic tissues subjected to cryopreservation are viable and maintain tissue integrity, featuring minimal changes after warming. Although viable somatic cells are obtained from these tissues, they undergo alterations in their metabolism and mitochondrial membrane potential. Improvements in the conservation conditions of somatic samples are needed to increase the quality of somatic tissue banks in this species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cryobiol.2021.06.003DOI Listing
June 2021

Isolation, characterization, and cryopreservation of collared peccary skin-derived fibroblast cell lines.

PeerJ 2020 3;8:e9136. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Árido, Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.

Background: Biobanking of cell lines is a promising tool of support for wildlife conservation. In particular, the ability to preserve fibroblast cell lines derived from collared peccaries is of significance as these wild mammals are unique to the Americas and play a large role in maintaining the ecosystem. We identified collared peccary fibroblasts by immunofluorescence and evaluated their morphology, growth and adherence capacity. Further, we monitored the viability and metabolic activity of the fibroblasts to determine the effects of passage number and cryopreservation on establishment of cell lines.

Methods: Skin biopsies were collected from the peripheral ear region from five adult animals in captivity. Initially, cells were isolated from fragments and cultured in the Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 2% antibiotic-antimycotic solution under a controlled atmosphere (38.5 °C, 5% CO). We evaluated the maintenance of primary cells for morphology, adherence capacity of explants, explants in subconfluence, cell growth and absence of contamination. Moreover, we identified the fibroblast cells by immunofluorescence. Additionally, to evaluate the influence of the number of passages (first, third and tenth passage) and cryopreservation on establishment of cell lines, fibroblasts were analysed for the viability, metabolic activity, population doubling time (PDT), levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm).

Results: All explants (20/20) adhered to the dish in 2.4 days ± 0.5 with growth around the explants in 4.6 days ± 0.7, and subconfluence was observed within 7.8 days ± 1.0. Moreover, by morphology and immunocytochemistry analyses, cells were identified as fibroblasts which presented oval nuclei, a fusiform shape and positive vimentin staining. No contamination was observed after culture without antibiotics and antifungals for 30 days. While there was no difference observed for cell viability after the passages (first vs. third: = 0.98; first vs. tenth: = 0.76; third vs. tenth: = 0.85), metabolic activity was found to be reduced in the tenth passage (23.2 ± 12.1%) when compared to that in the first and third passage (100.0 ± 24.4%, = 0.006). Moreover, the cryopreservation did not influence the viability ( = 0.11), metabolic activity ( = 0.77), or PDT ( = 0.11). Nevertheless, a greater ΔΨm ( = 0.0001) was observed for the cryopreserved cells (2.12 ± 0.14) when compared to that in the non-cryopreserved cells (1.00 ± 0.05). Additionally, the cryopreserved cells showed greater levels of intracellular ROS after thawing (1.69 ± 0.38 vs. 1.00 ± 0.22, = 0.04).

Conclusions: This study is the first report on isolation, characterization and cryopreservation of fibroblasts from collared peccaries. We showed that adherent cultures were efficient for obtaining fibroblasts, which can be used as donor cells for nuclei for species cloning and other applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.9136DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7275682PMC
June 2020

Production of collared peccary (Pecari tajacu Linnaeus, 1758) parthenogenic embryos following different oocyte chemical activation and in vitro maturation conditions.

Theriogenology 2020 Jan 14;142:320-327. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Federal Rural University of Semi-Arid, Mossoro, RN, Brazil. Electronic address:

To optimize the protocols for assisted reproductive techniques (ARTs) in collared peccary (Pecari tajacu Linnaeus, 1758), we evaluated various conditions for oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) and chemical activation. Initially, we assessed the IVM rates, cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) quality, and oocyte morphometry in the absence or presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF). There was no difference between the COCs matured in absence or presence of EGF for the expansion of cumulus cells (97.6% ± 1.2 vs. 100% ± 0.0), presence of first polar body (65.9% ± 1.2 vs. 70.5% ± 1.8), nuclear status in second metaphase (62.5% ± 11.6 vs. 68.4% ± 4.9), cytoplasmic maturation (100.0% ± 0.7 vs. 75.0% ± 0.7), reactive oxygen species levels (0.5 ± 0.2 vs. 0.3 ± 0.1), and mitochondrial membrane potential (1.1 ± 0.2 vs. 1.1 ± 0.1). However, the zona pellucida thickness of matured COCs was reduced in the presence of EGF. Thus, the EGF group was used for further experiments. The oocytes were artificially activated with ionomycin and four secondary activator combinations [6-dimethylaminopurine (6D), 6D and cytochalasin B (6D + CB), cycloheximide (CHX), and CHX and CB (CHX + CB)]. The effect of immature COCs based on cumulus cell layers and cytoplasm homogeneity (GI and GII or GIII COCs) on embryonic development and quality was evaluated. There was no difference in the cleavage rates among the groups of secondary activators. The cleavage rates of embryos derived from GI/GII and GIII COCs were greater than 72.2% and 25.0%, respectively. Moreover, treatment with CHX showed a reduction in the cleavage rate of embryos derived from GIII COCs when compared to the cleavage rate of embryos derived from GI/GII COCs (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, higher rates of blastocyst/total GI and GII COCs were observed in the 6D group (27.6% ± 0.3) compared to CHX group (6.9% ± 0.3). Additionally, only 6D treatment resulted in the production of embryos derived from GIII COCs (25.0% ± 0.2). The percentage of the ICM/total cell ratio was also greater in blastocysts derived from 6D (42.5% ± 19.0), 6D + CB (37.9% ± 21.9), and CHX + CB (43.8% ± 19.6) groups when compared to CHX (3.6% ± 0.1) group. Thus, the combination of ionomycin and 6D could produce collared peccary embryos by activation of both GI/GII COCs and GIII COCs. These optimized IVM conditions using EGF and chemical activation using ionomycin and 6D in collared peccaries form the first steps for establishing ARTs to conserve this species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2019.10.016DOI Listing
January 2020

Influence of storage time and nutrient medium on recovery of fibroblast-like cells from refrigerated collared peccary (Pecari tajacu Linnaeus, 1758) skin.

In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Anim 2018 Aug 19;54(7):486-495. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Federal Rural University of Semi-Arid, Av. Francisco Mota, 572, Mossoró, RN, 59625 900, Brazil.

Animal cloning is a promising technology for biodiversity conservation, and its success depends on the recovery of nucleus donor cells. Specifically for collared peccaries, found sometimes in regions that are difficult to access, the storage at 4-6°C of skin tissues would be an alternative for the conservation of genetic material. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate different storage periods and the presence of a nutrient medium at 4-6°C on the recovery of somatic cells from the skin of collared peccaries. To analyze cell recovery rates, ear explants were distributed in non-refrigerated samples and samples refrigerated for 10, 30, and 50 d in the absence or presence of nutrient medium. All explants were analyzed by histologically and cultured. Only the fragments stored for 50 d without medium showed an increase in the total thickness of skin. Moreover, increased storage period, regardless of the presence of medium, increased the halo number and reduced the metabolic activity. After culture, only the fragments stored without medium for 50 d did not yield any somatic cells. Cells recovered from explants stored for 10 d showed similar characteristics to these recovered from non-refrigerated explants, regardless of the presence of medium, including the day at which explants achieved attachment and the total time to reach subconfluence. In conclusion, viable cells can be recovered from somatic tissues of collared peccaries stored for up to 50 d in the presence of medium, and tissues refrigerated for up to 10 d in the presence of medium yielded more viable cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11626-018-0270-6DOI Listing
August 2018
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