Publications by authors named "Gaétan Lesca"

178 Publications

ATP1A2- and ATP1A3-associated early profound epileptic encephalopathy and polymicrogyria.

Brain 2021 Apr 21. Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Pediatric Neurology, Neurogenetics and Neurobiology Unit and Laboratories, Meyer Children's Hospital, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

Constitutional heterozygous mutations of ATP1A2 and ATP1A3, encoding for two distinct isoforms of the Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) alpha-subunit, have been associated with familial hemiplegic migraine (ATP1A2), alternating hemiplegia of childhood (ATP1A2/A3), rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia-areflexia-progressive optic atrophy, and relapsing encephalopathy with cerebellar ataxia (all ATP1A3). A few reports have described single individuals with heterozygous mutations of ATP1A2/A3 associated with severe childhood epilepsies. Early lethal hydrops fetalis, arthrogryposis, microcephaly, and polymicrogyria have been associated with homozygous truncating mutations in ATP1A2. We investigated the genetic causes of developmental and epileptic encephalopathies variably associated with malformations of cortical development in a large cohort and identified 22 patients with de novo or inherited heterozygous ATP1A2/A3 mutations. We characterized clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological findings, performed in silico and in vitro assays of the mutations' effects on the NKA-pump function, and studied genotype-phenotype correlations. Twenty-two patients harboured 19 distinct heterozygous mutations of ATP1A2 (six patients, five mutations) and ATP1A3 (16 patients, 14 mutations, including a mosaic individual). Polymicrogyria occurred in 10 (45%) patients, showing a mainly bilateral perisylvian pattern. Most patients manifested early, often neonatal, onset seizures with a multifocal or migrating pattern. A distinctive, 'profound' phenotype, featuring polymicrogyria or progressive brain atrophy and epilepsy, resulted in early lethality in seven patients (32%). In silico evaluation predicted all mutations to be detrimental. We tested 14 mutations in transfected COS-1 cells and demonstrated impaired NKA-pump activity, consistent with severe loss of function. Genotype-phenotype analysis suggested a link between the most severe phenotypes and lack of COS-1 cell survival, and also revealed a wide continuum of severity distributed across mutations that variably impair NKA-pump activity. We performed neuropathological analysis of the whole brain in two individuals with polymicrogyria respectively related to a heterozygous ATP1A3 mutation and a homozygous ATP1A2 mutation and found close similarities with findings suggesting a mainly neural pathogenesis, compounded by vascular and leptomeningeal abnormalities. Combining our report with other studies, we estimate that ∼5% of mutations in ATP1A2 and 12% in ATP1A3 can be associated with the severe and novel phenotypes that we describe here. Notably, a few of these mutations were associated with more than one phenotype. These findings assign novel, 'profound' and early lethal phenotypes of developmental and epileptic encephalopathies and polymicrogyria to the phenotypic spectrum associated with heterozygous ATP1A2/A3 mutations and indicate that severely impaired NKA pump function can disrupt brain morphogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awab052DOI Listing
April 2021

Clinical delineation of SETBP1 haploinsufficiency disorder.

Eur J Hum Genet 2021 Apr 19. Epub 2021 Apr 19.

Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

SETBP1 haploinsufficiency disorder (MIM#616078) is caused by haploinsufficiency of SETBP1 on chromosome 18q12.3, but there has not yet been any systematic evaluation of the major features of this monogenic syndrome, assessing penetrance and expressivity. We describe the first comprehensive study to delineate the associated clinical phenotype, with findings from 34 individuals, including 24 novel cases, all of whom have a SETBP1 loss-of-function variant or single (coding) gene deletion, confirmed by molecular diagnostics. The most commonly reported clinical features included mild motor developmental delay, speech impairment, intellectual disability, hypotonia, vision impairment, attention/concentration deficits, and hyperactivity. Although there is a mild overlap in certain facial features, the disorder does not lead to a distinctive recognizable facial gestalt. As well as providing insight into the clinical spectrum of SETBP1 haploinsufficiency disorder, this reports puts forward care recommendations for patient management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-021-00888-9DOI Listing
April 2021

Novel missense mutations in PTCHD1 alter its plasma membrane subcellular localization and cause intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder.

Hum Mutat 2021 Apr 15. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

UMR1253, iBrain, INSERM, University of Tours, Tours, France.

The X-linked PTCHD1 gene, encoding a synaptic membrane protein, has been involved in neurodevelopmental disorders with the description of deleterious genomic microdeletions or truncating coding mutations. Missense variants were also identified, however, without any functional evidence supporting their pathogenicity level. We investigated 13 missense variants of PTCHD1, including eight previously described (c.152G>A,p.(Ser51Asn); c.217C>T,p.(Leu73Phe); c.517A>G,p.(Ile173Val); c.542A>C,p.(Lys181Thr); c.583G>A,p.(Val195Ile); c.1076A>G,p.(His359Arg); c.1409C>A,p.(Ala470Asp); c.1436A>G,p.(Glu479Gly)), and five novel ones (c.95C>T,p.(Pro32Leu); c.95C>G,p.(Pro32Arg); c.638A>G,p.(Tyr213Cys); c.898G>C,p.(Gly300Arg); c.928G>C,p.(Ala310Pro)) identified in male patients with intellectual disability (ID) and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Interestingly, several of these variants involve amino acids localized in structural domains such as transmembrane segments. To evaluate their potentially deleterious impact on PTCHD1 protein function, we performed in vitro overexpression experiments of the wild-type and mutated forms of PTCHD1-GFP in HEK 293T and in Neuro-2a cell lines as well as in mouse hippocampal primary neuronal cultures. We found that six variants impaired the expression level of the PTCHD1 protein, and were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum suggesting abnormal protein folding. Our functional analyses thus provided evidence of the pathogenic impact of missense variants in PTCHD1, which reinforces the involvement of the PTCHD1 gene in ID and in ASD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.24208DOI Listing
April 2021

Patients with -related intellectual disability without distinctive features of Zimmermann-Laband/Temple-Baraitser syndrome.

J Med Genet 2021 Apr 2. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

APHP.Sorbonne Université, Département de Génétique, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié Salpêtrière et Hôpital Trousseau, Paris, Île-de-France, France.

De novo missense variants in encoding Kv10.1 are responsible for two clinically recognisable phenotypes: Temple-Baraitser syndrome (TBS) and Zimmermann-Laband syndrome (ZLS). The clinical overlap between these two syndromes suggests that they belong to a spectrum of -related encephalopathies. Affected patients have severe intellectual disability (ID) with or without epilepsy, hypertrichosis and distinctive features such as gingival hyperplasia and nail hypoplasia/aplasia (present in 20/23 reported cases).We report a series of seven patients with ID and de novo pathogenic variants identified by whole-exome sequencing or an epilepsy gene panel in whom the diagnosis of TBS/ZLS had not been first considered. Four of these variants, p.(Thr294Met), p.(Ala492Asp), p.(Thr493Asn) and p.(Gly496Arg), were located in the transmembrane domains S3 and S6 of Kv10.1 and one, p.(Arg693Gln), in its C-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain (CNBHD). Clinical reappraisal by the referring clinical geneticists confirmed the absence of the distinctive gingival and nail features of TBS/ZLS.Our study expands the phenotypical spectrum of -related encephalopathies to individuals with an attenuated extraneurological phenotype preventing a clinical diagnosis of TBS or ZLS. This subtype may be related to recurrent substitutions of the Gly496, suggesting a genotype-phenotype correlation and, possibly, to variants in the CNBHD domain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-107511DOI Listing
April 2021

Adult phenotype of encephalopathy.

J Med Genet 2021 Apr 2. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

Neurology Department, University Hospital Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium

Background: Pathogenic variants are a frequent cause of developmental and epileptic encephalopathy.

Methods: We recruited 13 adults (between 18 years and 45 years of age) with encephalopathy and reviewed their clinical, EEG, neuroimaging and treatment history.

Results: While most patients had daily seizures at seizure onset, seizure frequency declined or remitted during childhood and adulthood. The most common seizure type was tonic seizures (early) infancy, and tonic-clonic and focal impaired awareness seizures later in life. Ten individuals (77%) were seizure-free at last follow-up. In 38% of the individuals, earlier periods of seizure freedom lasting a minimum of 2 years followed by seizure recurrence had occurred. Of the 10 seizure-free patients, 4 were receiving a single antiseizure medication (ASM, carbamazepine, lamotrigine or levetiracetam), and 2 had stopped taking ASM. Intellectual disability (ID) ranged from mild to profound, with the majority (54%) of individuals in the severe category. At last contact, six individuals (46%) remained unable to walk independently, six (46%) had limb spasticity and four (31%) tetraparesis/tetraplegia. Six (46%) remained non-verbal, 10 (77%) had autistic features/autism, 4 (31%) exhibited aggressive behaviour and 4 (31%) destructive behaviour with self-injury. Four patients had visual problems, thought to be related to prematurity in one. Sleep problems were seen in six (46%) individuals.

Conclusion: Seizure frequency declines over the years and most patients are seizure-free in adulthood. Longer seizure-free periods followed by seizure recurrence are common during childhood and adolescence. Most adult patients have severe ID. Motor, language and behavioural problems are an issue of continuous concern.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-107449DOI Listing
April 2021

Refining Genotypes and Phenotypes in -Related Neurological Disorders.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Mar 10;22(6). Epub 2021 Mar 10.

Division of Paediatric Epileptology, Centre for Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

Pathogenic variants in , encoding for the voltage-gated potassium channel K1.2, have been identified as the cause for an evolving spectrum of neurological disorders. Affected individuals show early-onset developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, intellectual disability, and movement disorders resulting from cerebellar dysfunction. In addition, individuals with a milder course of epilepsy, complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia, and episodic ataxia have been reported. By analyzing phenotypic, functional, and genetic data from published reports and novel cases, we refine and further delineate phenotypic as well as functional subgroups of -associated disorders. Carriers of variants, leading to complex and mixed channel dysfunction that are associated with a gain- and loss-of-potassium conductance, more often show early developmental abnormalities and an earlier onset of epilepsy compared to individuals with variants resulting in loss- or gain-of-function. We describe seven additional individuals harboring three known and the novel variants p.(Pro407Ala) and p.(Tyr417Cys). The location of variants reported here highlights the importance of the proline(405)-valine(406)-proline(407) (PVP) motif in transmembrane domain S6 as a mutational hotspot. A novel case of self-limited infantile seizures suggests a continuous clinical spectrum of -related disorders. Our study provides further insights into the clinical spectrum, genotype-phenotype correlation, variability, and predicted functional impact of variants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22062824DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7999221PMC
March 2021

A survey of the European Reference Network EpiCARE on clinical practice for selected rare epilepsies.

Epilepsia Open 2021 03 13;6(1):160-170. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

IRCCS Mondino Foundation Pavia Italy.

Objective: Clinical care of rare and complex epilepsies is challenging, because evidence-based treatment guidelines are scarce, the experience of many physicians is limited, and interdisciplinary treatment of comorbidities is required. The pathomechanisms of rare epilepsies are, however, increasingly understood, which potentially fosters novel targeted therapies. The objectives of our survey were to obtain an overview of the clinical practice in European tertiary epilepsy centers treating patients with 5 arbitrarily selected rare epilepsies and to get an estimate of potentially available patients for future studies.

Methods: Members of the ( were invited to participate in a web-based survey on clinical practice of patients with Dravet syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), autoimmune encephalitis, and progressive myoclonic epilepsies including Unverricht Lundborg and Unverricht-like diseases. A consensus-based questionnaire was generated for each disease.

Results: Twenty-six of 30 invited epilepsy centers participated. Cohorts were present in most responding centers for TSC (87%), Dravet syndrome (85%), and autoimmune encephalitis (71%). Patients with TSC and Dravet syndrome represented the largest cohorts in these centers. The antiseizure drug treatments were rather consistent across the centers especially with regard to Dravet syndrome, infantile spasms in TSC, and Unverricht Lundborg / Unverricht-like disease. Available, widely used targeted therapies included everolimus in TSC and immunosuppressive therapies in autoimmune encephalitis. Screening for comorbidities was routinely done, but specific treatment protocols were lacking in most centers.

Significance: The survey summarizes the current clinical practice for selected rare epilepsies in tertiary European epilepsy centers and demonstrates consistency as well as heterogeneity in the treatment, underscoring the need for controlled trials and recommendations. The survey also provides estimates for potential participants of clinical trials recruited via EpiCARE, emphasizing the great potential of Reference Networks for future studies to evaluate new targeted therapies and to identify novel biomarkers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/epi4.12459DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7918306PMC
March 2021

Disruption of RFX family transcription factors causes autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, intellectual disability, and dysregulated behavior.

Genet Med 2021 Mar 3. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Division of Medical Genetics, Nemours/A.I. DuPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE, USA.

Purpose: We describe a novel neurobehavioral phenotype of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual disability, and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) associated with de novo or inherited deleterious variants in members of the RFX family of genes. RFX genes are evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that act as master regulators of central nervous system development and ciliogenesis.

Methods: We assembled a cohort of 38 individuals (from 33 unrelated families) with de novo variants in RFX3, RFX4, and RFX7. We describe their common clinical phenotypes and present bioinformatic analyses of expression patterns and downstream targets of these genes as they relate to other neurodevelopmental risk genes.

Results: These individuals share neurobehavioral features including ASD, intellectual disability, and/or ADHD; other frequent features include hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli and sleep problems. RFX3, RFX4, and RFX7 are strongly expressed in developing and adult human brain, and X-box binding motifs as well as RFX ChIP-seq peaks are enriched in the cis-regulatory regions of known ASD risk genes.

Conclusion: These results establish a likely role of deleterious variation in RFX3, RFX4, and RFX7 in cases of monogenic intellectual disability, ADHD and ASD, and position these genes as potentially critical transcriptional regulators of neurobiological pathways associated with neurodevelopmental disease pathogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-021-01114-zDOI Listing
March 2021

SPEN haploinsufficiency causes a neurodevelopmental disorder overlapping proximal 1p36 deletion syndrome with an episignature of X chromosomes in females.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 03 16;108(3):502-516. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15224, USA.

Deletion 1p36 (del1p36) syndrome is the most common human disorder resulting from a terminal autosomal deletion. This condition is molecularly and clinically heterogeneous. Deletions involving two non-overlapping regions, known as the distal (telomeric) and proximal (centromeric) critical regions, are sufficient to cause the majority of the recurrent clinical features, although with different facial features and dysmorphisms. SPEN encodes a transcriptional repressor commonly deleted in proximal del1p36 syndrome and is located centromeric to the proximal 1p36 critical region. Here, we used clinical data from 34 individuals with truncating variants in SPEN to define a neurodevelopmental disorder presenting with features that overlap considerably with those of proximal del1p36 syndrome. The clinical profile of this disease includes developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, anxiety, aggressive behavior, attention deficit disorder, hypotonia, brain and spine anomalies, congenital heart defects, high/narrow palate, facial dysmorphisms, and obesity/increased BMI, especially in females. SPEN also emerges as a relevant gene for del1p36 syndrome by co-expression analyses. Finally, we show that haploinsufficiency of SPEN is associated with a distinctive DNA methylation episignature of the X chromosome in affected females, providing further evidence of a specific contribution of the protein to the epigenetic control of this chromosome, and a paradigm of an X chromosome-specific episignature that classifies syndromic traits. We conclude that SPEN is required for multiple developmental processes and SPEN haploinsufficiency is a major contributor to a disorder associated with deletions centromeric to the previously established 1p36 critical regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.01.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8008487PMC
March 2021

The phenotypic spectrum of X-linked, infantile onset ALG13-related developmental and epileptic encephalopathy.

Epilepsia 2021 02 7;62(2):325-334. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Institute of Human Genetics, University of Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany.

Objective: Asparagine-linked glycosylation 13 (ALG13) deficiencies have been repeatedly described in the literature with the clinical phenotype of a developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE). Most cases were females carrying the recurrent ALG13 de novo variant, p.(Asn107Ser), with normal transferrin electrophoresis.

Methods: We delineate the phenotypic spectrum of 38 individuals, 37 girls and one boy, 16 of them novel and 22 published, with the most common pathogenic ALG13 variant p.(Asn107Ser) and additionally report the phenotype of three individuals carrying other likely pathogenic ALG13 variants.

Results: The phenotypic spectrum often comprised pharmacoresistant epilepsy with epileptic spasms, mostly with onset within the first 6 months of life and with spasm persistence in one-half of the cases. Tonic seizures were the most prevalent additional seizure type. Electroencephalography showed hypsarrhythmia and at a later stage of the disease in one-third of all cases paroxysms of fast activity with electrodecrement. ALG13-related DEE was usually associated with severe to profound developmental delay; ambulation was acquired by one-third of the cases, whereas purposeful hand use was sparse or completely absent. Hand stereotypies and dyskinetic movements including dystonia or choreoathetosis were relatively frequent. Verbal communication skills were absent or poor, and eye contact and pursuit were often impaired.

Significance: X-linked ALG13-related DEE usually manifests as West syndrome with severe to profound developmental delay. It is predominantly caused by the recurrent de novo missense variant p.(Asn107Ser). Comprehensive functional studies will be able to prove or disprove an association with congenital disorder of glycosylation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.16761DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7898319PMC
February 2021

Missense variant contribution to USP9X-female syndrome.

NPJ Genom Med 2020 Dec 9;5(1):53. Epub 2020 Dec 9.

Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

USP9X is an X-chromosome gene that escapes X-inactivation. Loss or compromised function of USP9X leads to neurodevelopmental disorders in males and females. While males are impacted primarily by hemizygous partial loss-of-function missense variants, in females de novo heterozygous complete loss-of-function mutations predominate, and give rise to the clinically recognisable USP9X-female syndrome. Here we provide evidence of the contribution of USP9X missense and small in-frame deletion variants in USP9X-female syndrome also. We scrutinise the pathogenicity of eleven such variants, ten of which were novel. Combined application of variant prediction algorithms, protein structure modelling, and assessment under clinically relevant guidelines universally support their pathogenicity. The core phenotype of this cohort overlapped with previous descriptions of USP9X-female syndrome, but exposed heightened variability. Aggregate phenotypic information of 35 currently known females with predicted pathogenic variation in USP9X reaffirms the clinically recognisable USP9X-female syndrome, and highlights major differences when compared to USP9X-male associated neurodevelopmental disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41525-020-00162-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7725775PMC
December 2020

BICRA, a SWI/SNF Complex Member, Is Associated with BAF-Disorder Related Phenotypes in Humans and Model Organisms.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 12 23;107(6):1096-1112. Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Division of Clinical Genetics, Children's Mercy Hospital, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA.

SWI/SNF-related intellectual disability disorders (SSRIDDs) are rare neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by developmental disability, coarse facial features, and fifth digit/nail hypoplasia that are caused by pathogenic variants in genes that encode for members of the SWI/SNF (or BAF) family of chromatin remodeling complexes. We have identified 12 individuals with rare variants (10 loss-of-function, 2 missense) in the BICRA (BRD4 interacting chromatin remodeling complex-associated protein) gene, also known as GLTSCR1, which encodes a subunit of the non-canonical BAF (ncBAF) complex. These individuals exhibited neurodevelopmental phenotypes that include developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, and behavioral abnormalities as well as dysmorphic features. Notably, the majority of individuals lack the fifth digit/nail hypoplasia phenotype, a hallmark of most SSRIDDs. To confirm the role of BICRA in the development of these phenotypes, we performed functional characterization of the zebrafish and Drosophila orthologs of BICRA. In zebrafish, a mutation of bicra that mimics one of the loss-of-function variants leads to craniofacial defects possibly akin to the dysmorphic facial features seen in individuals harboring putatively pathogenic BICRA variants. We further show that Bicra physically binds to other non-canonical ncBAF complex members, including the BRD9/7 ortholog, CG7154, and is the defining member of the ncBAF complex in flies. Like other SWI/SNF complex members, loss of Bicra function in flies acts as a dominant enhancer of position effect variegation but in a more context-specific manner. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of BICRA leads to a unique SSRIDD in humans whose phenotypes overlap with those previously reported.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.11.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7820627PMC
December 2020

Inhibition of G-protein signalling in cardiac dysfunction of intellectual developmental disorder with cardiac arrhythmia (IDDCA) syndrome.

J Med Genet 2020 Nov 10. Epub 2020 Nov 10.

Department of Neuromuscular Disorders, Queen Square Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK.

Background: Pathogenic variants of encoding the β subunit of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein cause IDDCA syndrome, an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with cognitive disability and cardiac arrhythmia, particularly severe bradycardia.

Methods: We used echocardiography and telemetric ECG recordings to investigate consequences of loss in mouse.

Results: We delineated a key role of in heart sinus conduction and showed that -inhibitory signalling is essential for parasympathetic control of heart rate (HR) and maintenance of the sympathovagal balance. mice were smaller and had a smaller heart than and , but exhibited better cardiac function. Lower autonomic nervous system modulation through diminished parasympathetic control and greater sympathetic regulation resulted in a higher baseline HR in mice. In contrast, mice exhibited profound bradycardia on treatment with carbachol, while sympathetic modulation of the cardiac stimulation was not altered. Concordantly, transcriptome study pinpointed altered expression of genes involved in cardiac muscle contractility in atria and ventricles of knocked-out mice. Homozygous loss resulted in significantly higher frequencies of sinus arrhythmias. Moreover, we described 13 affected individuals, increasing the IDDCA cohort to 44 patients.

Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that loss of negative regulation of the inhibitory G-protein signalling causes HR perturbations in mice, an effect mainly driven by impaired parasympathetic activity. We anticipate that unravelling the mechanism of signalling in the autonomic control of the heart will pave the way for future drug screening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-107015DOI Listing
November 2020

NCKAP1 Disruptive Variants Lead to a Neurodevelopmental Disorder with Core Features of Autism.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 11;107(5):963-976

Service of Endocrinology, Diabetology, and Metabolism, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne 1011, Switzerland.

NCKAP1/NAP1 regulates neuronal cytoskeletal dynamics and is essential for neuronal differentiation in the developing brain. Deleterious variants in NCKAP1 have been identified in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability; however, its clinical significance remains unclear. To determine its significance, we assemble genotype and phenotype data for 21 affected individuals from 20 unrelated families with predicted deleterious variants in NCKAP1. This includes 16 individuals with de novo (n = 8), transmitted (n = 6), or inheritance unknown (n = 2) truncating variants, two individuals with structural variants, and three with potentially disruptive de novo missense variants. We report a de novo and ultra-rare deleterious variant burden of NCKAP1 in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders which needs further replication. ASD or autistic features, language and motor delay, and variable expression of intellectual or learning disability are common clinical features. Among inherited cases, there is evidence of deleterious variants segregating with neuropsychiatric disorders. Based on available human brain transcriptomic data, we show that NCKAP1 is broadly and highly expressed in both prenatal and postnatal periods and demostrate enriched expression in excitatory neurons and radial glias but depleted expression in inhibitory neurons. Mouse in utero electroporation experiments reveal that Nckap1 loss of function promotes neuronal migration during early cortical development. Combined, these data support a role for disruptive NCKAP1 variants in neurodevelopmental delay/autism, possibly by interfering with neuronal migration early in cortical development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.10.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7674997PMC
November 2020

KMT2B-related disorders: expansion of the phenotypic spectrum and long-term efficacy of deep brain stimulation.

Brain 2020 12;143(11):3242-3261

Département de Génétique médicale, Maladies rares et médecine personnalisée, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, France.

Heterozygous mutations in KMT2B are associated with an early-onset, progressive and often complex dystonia (DYT28). Key characteristics of typical disease include focal motor features at disease presentation, evolving through a caudocranial pattern into generalized dystonia, with prominent oromandibular, laryngeal and cervical involvement. Although KMT2B-related disease is emerging as one of the most common causes of early-onset genetic dystonia, much remains to be understood about the full spectrum of the disease. We describe a cohort of 53 patients with KMT2B mutations, with detailed delineation of their clinical phenotype and molecular genetic features. We report new disease presentations, including atypical patterns of dystonia evolution and a subgroup of patients with a non-dystonic neurodevelopmental phenotype. In addition to the previously reported systemic features, our study has identified co-morbidities, including the risk of status dystonicus, intrauterine growth retardation, and endocrinopathies. Analysis of this study cohort (n = 53) in tandem with published cases (n = 80) revealed that patients with chromosomal deletions and protein truncating variants had a significantly higher burden of systemic disease (with earlier onset of dystonia) than those with missense variants. Eighteen individuals had detailed longitudinal data available after insertion of deep brain stimulation for medically refractory dystonia. Median age at deep brain stimulation was 11.5 years (range: 4.5-37.0 years). Follow-up after deep brain stimulation ranged from 0.25 to 22 years. Significant improvement of motor function and disability (as assessed by the Burke Fahn Marsden's Dystonia Rating Scales, BFMDRS-M and BFMDRS-D) was evident at 6 months, 1 year and last follow-up (motor, P = 0.001, P = 0.004, and P = 0.012; disability, P = 0.009, P = 0.002 and P = 0.012). At 1 year post-deep brain stimulation, >50% of subjects showed BFMDRS-M and BFMDRS-D improvements of >30%. In the long-term deep brain stimulation cohort (deep brain stimulation inserted for >5 years, n = 8), improvement of >30% was maintained in 5/8 and 3/8 subjects for the BFMDRS-M and BFMDRS-D, respectively. The greatest BFMDRS-M improvements were observed for trunk (53.2%) and cervical (50.5%) dystonia, with less clinical impact on laryngeal dystonia. Improvements in gait dystonia decreased from 20.9% at 1 year to 16.2% at last assessment; no patient maintained a fully independent gait. Reduction of BFMDRS-D was maintained for swallowing (52.9%). Five patients developed mild parkinsonism following deep brain stimulation. KMT2B-related disease comprises an expanding continuum from infancy to adulthood, with early evidence of genotype-phenotype correlations. Except for laryngeal dysphonia, deep brain stimulation provides a significant improvement in quality of life and function with sustained clinical benefit depending on symptoms distribution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awaa304DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7719027PMC
December 2020

New insights into the clinical and molecular spectrum of the novel CYFIP2-related neurodevelopmental disorder and impairment of the WRC-mediated actin dynamics.

Genet Med 2021 Mar 5;23(3):543-554. Epub 2020 Nov 5.

Department of Medical Genetics, Lyon University Hospital, Lyon, France.

Purpose: A few de novo missense variants in the cytoplasmic FMRP-interacting protein 2 (CYFIP2) gene have recently been described as a novel cause of severe intellectual disability, seizures, and hypotonia in 18 individuals, with p.Arg87 substitutions in the majority.

Methods: We assembled data from 19 newly identified and all 18 previously published individuals with CYFIP2 variants. By structural modeling and investigation of WAVE-regulatory complex (WRC)-mediated actin polymerization in six patient fibroblast lines we assessed the impact of CYFIP2 variants on the WRC.

Results: Sixteen of 19 individuals harbor two previously described and 11 novel (likely) disease-associated missense variants. We report p.Asp724 as second mutational hotspot (4/19 cases). Genotype-phenotype correlation confirms a consistently severe phenotype in p.Arg87 patients but a more variable phenotype in p.Asp724 and other substitutions. Three individuals with milder phenotypes carry putative loss-of-function variants, which remain of unclear pathogenicity. Structural modeling predicted missense variants to disturb interactions within the WRC or impair CYFIP2 stability. Consistent with its role in WRC-mediated actin polymerization we substantiate aberrant regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in patient fibroblasts.

Conclusion: Our study expands the clinical and molecular spectrum of CYFIP2-related neurodevelopmental disorder and provides evidence for aberrant WRC-mediated actin dynamics as contributing cellular pathomechanism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-01011-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7935717PMC
March 2021

NEXMIF encephalopathy: an X-linked disorder with male and female phenotypic patterns.

Genet Med 2021 Feb 4;23(2):363-373. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Department of Clinical Genomics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Purpose: Pathogenic variants in the X-linked gene NEXMIF (previously KIAA2022) are associated with intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorder, and epilepsy. We aimed to delineate the female and male phenotypic spectrum of NEXMIF encephalopathy.

Methods: Through an international collaboration, we analyzed the phenotypes and genotypes of 87 patients with NEXMIF encephalopathy.

Results: Sixty-three females and 24 males (46 new patients) with NEXMIF encephalopathy were studied, with 30 novel variants. Phenotypic features included developmental delay/ID in 86/87 (99%), seizures in 71/86 (83%) and multiple comorbidities. Generalized seizures predominated including myoclonic seizures and absence seizures (both 46/70, 66%), absence with eyelid myoclonia (17/70, 24%), and atonic seizures (30/70, 43%). Males had more severe developmental impairment; females had epilepsy more frequently, and varied from unaffected to severely affected. All NEXMIF pathogenic variants led to a premature stop codon or were deleterious structural variants. Most arose de novo, although X-linked segregation occurred for both sexes. Somatic mosaicism occurred in two males and a family with suspected parental mosaicism.

Conclusion: NEXMIF encephalopathy is an X-linked, generalized developmental and epileptic encephalopathy characterized by myoclonic-atonic epilepsy overlapping with eyelid myoclonia with absence. Some patients have developmental encephalopathy without epilepsy. Males have more severe developmental impairment. NEXMIF encephalopathy arises due to loss-of-function variants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-00988-9DOI Listing
February 2021

Early-onset autoimmunity associated with SOCS1 haploinsufficiency.

Nat Commun 2020 10 21;11(1):5341. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Service de Génétique, Hospices Civils de Lyon - GHE, and Institut Neuromyogène, CNRS UMR 5310 - INSERM U1217, Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France.

Autoimmunity can occur when a checkpoint of self-tolerance fails. The study of familial autoimmune diseases can reveal pathophysiological mechanisms involved in more common autoimmune diseases. Here, by whole-exome/genome sequencing we identify heterozygous, autosomal-dominant, germline loss-of-function mutations in the SOCS1 gene in ten patients from five unrelated families with early onset autoimmune manifestations. The intracellular protein SOCS1 is known to downregulate cytokine signaling by inhibiting the JAK-STAT pathway. Accordingly, patient-derived lymphocytes exhibit increased STAT activation in vitro in response to interferon-γ, IL-2 and IL-4 that is reverted by the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. This effect is associated with a series of in vitro and in vivo immune abnormalities consistent with lymphocyte hyperactivity. Hence, SOCS1 haploinsufficiency causes a dominantly inherited predisposition to early onset autoimmune diseases related to cytokine hypersensitivity of immune cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-18925-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7578789PMC
October 2020

Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy Caused by a Homozygous Splicing Variant of SLC7A6OS.

Ann Neurol 2021 02 5;89(2):402-407. Epub 2020 Nov 5.

Genetics Department, Lyon Civil Hospices, Lyon, France.

Exome sequencing was performed in 2 unrelated families with progressive myoclonus epilepsy. Affected individuals from both families shared a rare, homozygous c.191A > G variant affecting a splice site in SLC7A6OS. Analysis of cDNA from lymphoblastoid cells demonstrated partial splice site abolition and the creation of an abnormal isoform. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot showed a marked reduction of protein expression. Haplotype analysis identified a ~0.85cM shared genomic region on chromosome 16q encompassing the c.191A > G variant, consistent with a distant ancestor common to both families. Our results suggest that biallelic loss-of-function variants in SLC7A6OS are a novel genetic cause of progressive myoclonus epilepsy. ANN NEUROL 2021;89:402-407.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.25941DOI Listing
February 2021

Neonatal developmental and epileptic encephalopathy due to autosomal recessive variants in SLC13A5 gene.

Epilepsia 2020 11 16;61(11):2474-2485. Epub 2020 Oct 16.

Department of Child Neuropsychiatry, Children's Hospital, Ancona, Italy.

Objective: Autosomal recessive pathogenic variants of the SLC13A5 gene are associated with severe neonatal epilepsy, developmental delay, and tooth hypoplasia/hypodontia. We report on 14 additional patients and compare their phenotypic features to previously published patients to identify the clinical hallmarks of this disorder.

Methods: We collected clinical features of 14 patients carrying biallelic variants in SLC13A5 and performed a PubMed search to identify previously published patients.

Results: All patients presented clonic or tonic seizures in the first days of life, evolving into status epilepticus in 57%. Analysis of seizure frequency and developmental milestones divided into five epochs showed an evolutionary trajectory of both items. In the first 3 years of life, 72% of patients had weekly/monthly seizures, often triggered by fever; 14% were seizure-free. Between the ages of 3 and 12 years, 60% become seizure-free; in the following years, up to age 18 years, 57% were seizure-free. After the age of 18 years, all three patients reaching this age were seizure-free. Similarly, 86% of patients at onset presented mild to moderate developmental impairment and diffuse hypotonia. In late childhood, all had developmental delay that was severe in most. Benzodiazepines, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine were the most effective drugs. Eight probands carried heterozygous compound variants, and homozygous pathogenic variants occurred in six. Literature review identified 45 patients carrying SLC13A5 gene pathogenic variants whose clinical features overlapped with our cohort. A peculiar and distinguishing sign is the presence of tooth hypoplasia and/or hypodontia in most patients.

Significance: Autosomal recessive pathogenic variants in SLC13A5 are associated with a distinct neonatal epileptic encephalopathy evolving into severe cognitive and motor impairment, yet with seizures that settle down in late childhood. Tooth hypoplasia or hypodontia remains the peculiar feature. The SLC13A5 gene should be screened in neonatal epileptic encephalopathies; its recessive inheritance has relevance for genetic counseling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.16699DOI Listing
November 2020

Sequence variations of ACVRL1 play a critical role in hepatic vascular malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

Orphanet J Rare Dis 2020 09 22;15(1):254. Epub 2020 Sep 22.

Hospices Civils de Lyon, Service de Génétique, Groupement Hospitalier Est, 69677, Bron, France.

Background: Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple telangiectases and caused by germline disease-causing variants in the ENG (HHT1), ACVRL1 (HHT2) and, to a lesser extent MADH4 and GDF2, which encode proteins involved in the TGF-β/BMP9 signaling pathway. Common visceral complications of HHT are caused by pulmonary, cerebral, or hepatic arteriovenous malformations (HAVMs). There is large intrafamilial variability in the severity of visceral involvement, suggesting a role for modifier genes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential role of ENG, ACVRL1, and of other candidate genes belonging to the same biological pathway in the development of HAVMs.

Methods: We selected 354 patients from the French HHT patient database who had one disease causing variant in either ENG or ACVRL1 and who underwent hepatic exploration. We first compared the distribution of the different types of variants with the occurrence of HAVMs. Then, we genotyped 51 Tag-SNPs from the Hap Map database located in 8 genes that encode proteins belonging to the TGF-β/BMP9 pathway (ACVRL1, ENG, GDF2, MADH4, SMAD1, SMAD5, TGFB1, TGFBR1), as well as in two additional candidate genes (PTPN14 and ADAM17). We addressed the question of a possible genetic association with the occurrence of HAVMs.

Results: The proportion of patients with germline ACVRL1 variants and the proportion of women were significantly higher in HHT patients with HAVMs. In the HHT2 group, HAVMs were more frequent in patients with truncating variants. Six SNPs (3 in ACVRL1, 1 in ENG, 1 in SMAD5, and 1 in ADAM17) were significantly associated with HAVMs. After correction for multiple testing, only one remained significantly associated (rs2277383).

Conclusions: In this large association study, we confirmed the strong relationship between ACVRL1 and the development of HAVMs. Common polymorphisms of ACVRL1 may also play a role in the development of HAVMs, as a modifying factor, independently of the disease-causing variants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13023-020-01533-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7507685PMC
September 2020

Developmental and epilepsy spectrum of KCNB1 encephalopathy with long-term outcome.

Epilepsia 2020 11 21;61(11):2461-2473. Epub 2020 Sep 21.

Reference Center for Rare Developmental Abnormalities CLAD-Ouest, Rennes University Hospital Center, Rennes, France.

Objective: We aimed to delineate the phenotypic spectrum and long-term outcome of individuals with KCNB1 encephalopathy.

Methods: We collected genetic, clinical, electroencephalographic, and imaging data of individuals with KCNB1 pathogenic variants recruited through an international collaboration, with the support of the family association "KCNB1 France." Patients were classified as having developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE) or developmental encephalopathy (DE). In addition, we reviewed published cases and provided the long-term outcome in patients older than 12 years from our series and from literature.

Results: Our series included 36 patients (21 males, median age = 10 years, range = 1.6 months-34 years). Twenty patients (56%) had DEE with infantile onset seizures (seizure onset = 10 months, range = 10 days-3.5 years), whereas 16 (33%) had DE with late onset epilepsy in 10 (seizure onset = 5 years, range = 18 months-25 years) and without epilepsy in six. Cognitive impairment was more severe in individuals with DEE compared to those with DE. Analysis of 73 individuals with KCNB1 pathogenic variants (36 from our series and 37 published individuals in nine reports) showed developmental delay in all with severe to profound intellectual disability in 67% (n = 41/61) and autistic features in 56% (n = 32/57). Long-term outcome in 22 individuals older than 12 years (14 in our series and eight published individuals) showed poor cognitive, psychiatric, and behavioral outcome. Epilepsy course was variable. Missense variants were associated with more frequent and more severe epilepsy compared to truncating variants.

Significance: Our study describes the phenotypic spectrum of KCNB1 encephalopathy, which varies from severe DEE to DE with or without epilepsy. Although cognitive impairment is worse in patients with DEE, long-term outcome is poor for most and missense variants are associated with more severe epilepsy outcome. Further understanding of disease mechanisms should facilitate the development of targeted therapies, much needed to improve the neurodevelopmental prognosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.16679DOI Listing
November 2020

A de novo frameshift pathogenic variant in TBR1 identified in autism without intellectual disability.

Hum Genomics 2020 09 18;14(1):32. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

Lyon Hospitals, Genetics Service and National Reference Centre for Developmental Anomalies, Lyon, France.

Background: In order to be able to provide accurate genetic counseling to patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), it is crucial to identify correlations between heterogeneous phenotypes and genetic alterations. Among the hundreds of de novo pathogenic variants reported in ASD, single-nucleotide variations and small insertions/deletions were reported in TBR1. This gene encodes a transcription factor that plays a key role in brain development. Pathogenic variants in TBR1 are often associated with severe forms of ASD, including intellectual disability and language impairment.

Methods: Adults diagnosed with ASD but without intellectual disability (diagnosis of Asperger syndrome, according to the DSM-IV) took part in a genetic consultation encompassing metabolic assessments, a molecular karyotype and the screening of a panel of 268 genes involved in intellectual disability, ASD and epilepsy. In addition, the patient reported here went through a neuropsychological assessment, structural magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements.

Results: Here, we report the case of a young adult male who presents with a typical form of ASD. Importantly, this patient presents with no intellectual disability or language impairment, despite a de novo heterozygous frameshift pathogenic variant in TBR1, leading to an early premature termination codon (c.26del, p.(Pro9Leufs*12)).

Conclusion: Based on this case report, we discuss the role of TBR1 in general brain development, language development, intellectual disability and other symptoms of ASD. Providing a detailed clinical description of the individuals with such pathogenic variants should help to understand the genotype-phenotype relationships in ASD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40246-020-00281-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7501624PMC
September 2020

Gabapentin treatment in a patient with KCNQ2 developmental epileptic encephalopathy.

Pharmacol Res 2020 10 15;160:105200. Epub 2020 Sep 15.

Dept. of Neuroscience, University of Naples "Federico II", Naples, Italy. Electronic address:

De novo variants in KCNQ2 encoding for Kv7.2 voltage-dependent neuronal potassium (K) channel subunits are associated with developmental epileptic encephalopathy (DEE). We herein describe the clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) features of a child with early-onset DEE caused by the novel KCNQ2 p.G310S variant. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the mutation induces loss-of-function effects on the currents produced by channels incorporating mutant subunits; these effects were counteracted by the selective Kv7 opener retigabine and by gabapentin, a recently described Kv7 activator. Given these data, the patient started treatment with gabapentin, showing a rapid and sustained clinical and EEG improvement over the following months. Overall, these results suggest that gabapentin can be regarded as a precision therapy for DEEs due to KCNQ2 loss-of-function mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phrs.2020.105200DOI Listing
October 2020

Follow-up of two adult brothers with homozygous CEP57 pathogenic variants expands the phenotype of Mosaic Variegated Aneuploidy Syndrome.

Eur J Med Genet 2020 Nov 28;63(11):104044. Epub 2020 Aug 28.

Service de Génétique, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron, France; Equipe GENDEV, CRNL, INSERM U1028 CNRS UMR5292 Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France. Electronic address:

Mosaic Variegated Aneuploidy Syndrome (MVA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mosaic aneuploidies involving multiple chromosomes and tissues. Affected individuals typically present with severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, developmental delay and predisposition to cancer and epilepsy. Three genes, BUB1B, CEP57 and TRIP13, are involved in this syndrome. Only 7 patients carrying pathogenic variants in CEP57 are reported to date. Here we report two adult brothers born to Moroccan related parents, who presented with intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, learning disabilities, skeletal anomalies with thumb hypoplasia and dental abnormalities. Both brothers have mosaic variegated aneuploidies on blood karyotype. A previously reported homozygous 11 bp duplication was identified in CEP57 in the two brothers. We propose that a FoSTeS (Fork Stalling and Template Switching) mechanism could be involved in the occurrence of this duplication. This report expands the phenotypical spectrum associated with CEP57 and highlights the interest of blood karyotype in patients presenting with short stature and microcephaly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2020.104044DOI Listing
November 2020

Multisystem disorders, severe developmental delay and seizures in two affected siblings, expanding the phenotype of PIGC deficiency.

Eur J Med Genet 2020 Oct 22;63(10):103994. Epub 2020 Jul 22.

Service de Génétique, Centre de Biologie et de Pathologie Est, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France; Lyon Neuroscience Research Centre, GENDEV Team, CNRS UMR 5292, INSERM U1028, France; Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, France; Centre de Référence des Épilepsies Rares, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.

PIGC (OMIM 601730) encodes the PIGC protein, which is part of an enzyme complex involved in the biosynthesis of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol protein anchor. The other proteins in the complex include PIGA, PIGH, PIGQ, PIGY, PIGP and DPM2. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in PIGC have recently been described to cause severe global developmental delay, intellectual disability, and seizures in two unrelated families, without indication of another system involvement or dysmorphism. Here we describe two siblings, born to second cousin parents, displaying severe psychomotor delay, seizures, organomegaly, cardiopulmonary anomalies, and similar facial dysmorphism. Exome sequencing in the boy revealed a homozygous variant in PIGC gene, c.12_13insTTGTGACTAACA leading to a premature stop codon p.(Gln4_Pro5insLeu*). His affected sister was also found to be homozygous, and their parents were found to be heterozygous. This is the first detailed clinical description of two related patients suggesting that PIGC deficiency can cause a severe recognisable phenotype including multisystem disorders, in association to previously reported severe developmental delay and seizures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2020.103994DOI Listing
October 2020

Clinical and molecular description of 19 patients with GATAD2B-Associated Neurodevelopmental Disorder (GAND).

Eur J Med Genet 2020 Oct 17;63(10):104004. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Center for Medical Genetics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.

De novo pathogenic variants in the GATAD2B gene have been associated with a syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder (GAND) characterized by severe intellectual disability (ID), impaired speech, childhood hypotonia, and dysmorphic features. Since its first description in 2013, nine patients have been reported in case reports and a series of 50 patients was recently published, which is consistent with the relative frequency of GATAD2B pathogenic variants in public databases. We report the detailed phenotype of 19 patients from various ethnic backgrounds with confirmed pathogenic GATAD2B variants including intragenic deletions. All individuals presented developmental delay with a median age of 2.5 years for independent walking and of 3 years for first spoken words. GATAD2B variant carriers showed very little subsequent speech progress, two patients over 30 years of age remaining non-verbal. ID was mostly moderate to severe, with one profound and one mild case, which shows a wider spectrum of disease severity than previously reported. We confirm macrocephaly as a major feature in GAND (53%). Most common dysmorphic features included broad forehead, deeply set eyes, hypertelorism, wide nasal base, and pointed chin. Conversely, prenatal abnormalities, non-cerebral malformations, epilepsy, and autistic behavior were uncommon. Other features included feeding difficulties, behavioral abnormalities, and unspecific abnormalities on brain MRI. Improving our knowledge of the clinical phenotype is essential for correct interpretation of the molecular results and accurate patient management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2020.104004DOI Listing
October 2020

Defining the phenotype of FHF1 developmental and epileptic encephalopathy.

Epilepsia 2020 07 9;61(7):e71-e78. Epub 2020 Jul 9.

Pediatric Neurology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Fibroblast growth-factor homologous factor (FHF1) gene variants have recently been associated with developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE). FHF1 encodes a cytosolic protein that modulates neuronal sodium channel gating. We aim to refine the electroclinical phenotypic spectrum of patients with pathogenic FHF1 variants. We retrospectively collected clinical, genetic, neurophysiologic, and neuroimaging data of 17 patients with FHF1-DEE. Sixteen patients had recurrent heterozygous FHF1 missense variants: 14 had the recurrent p.Arg114His variant and two had a novel likely pathogenic variant p.Gly112Ser. The p.Arg114His variant is associated with an earlier onset and more severe phenotype. One patient carried a chromosomal microduplication involving FHF1. Twelve patients carried a de novo variant, five (29.5%) inherited from parents with gonadic or somatic mosaicism. Seizure onset was between 1 day and 41 months; in 76.5% it was within 30 days. Tonic seizures were the most frequent seizure type. Twelve patients (70.6%) had drug-resistant epilepsy, 14 (82.3%) intellectual disability, and 11 (64.7%) behavioral disturbances. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed mild cerebral and/or cerebellar atrophy in nine patients (52.9%). Overall, our findings expand and refine the clinical, EEG, and imaging phenotype of patients with FHF1-DEE, which is characterized by early onset epilepsy with tonic seizures, associated with moderate to severe ID and psychiatric features.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.16582DOI Listing
July 2020

Clinical interpretation of variants identified in RNU4ATAC, a non-coding spliceosomal gene.

PLoS One 2020 6;15(7):e0235655. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Equipe GENDEV, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences de Lyon, Inserm U1028, CNRS UMR5292, Université Lyon 1, Université St Etienne, Lyon, France.

Biallelic variants in RNU4ATAC, a non-coding gene transcribed into the minor spliceosome component U4atac snRNA, are responsible for three rare recessive developmental diseases, namely Taybi-Linder/MOPD1, Roifman and Lowry-Wood syndromes. Next-generation sequencing of clinically heterogeneous cohorts (children with either a suspected genetic disorder or a congenital microcephaly) recently identified mutations in this gene, illustrating how profoundly these technologies are modifying genetic testing and assessment. As RNU4ATAC has a single non-coding exon, the bioinformatic prediction algorithms assessing the effect of sequence variants on splicing or protein function are irrelevant, which makes variant interpretation challenging to molecular diagnostic laboratories. In order to facilitate and improve clinical diagnostic assessment and genetic counseling, we present i) an update of the previously reported RNU4ATAC mutations and an analysis of the genetic variations affecting this gene using the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD) resource; ii) the pathogenicity prediction performances of scores computed based on an RNA structure prediction tool and of those produced by the Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion tool for the 285 RNU4ATAC variants identified in patients or in large-scale sequencing projects; iii) a method, based on a cellular assay, that allows to measure the effect of RNU4ATAC variants on splicing efficiency of a minor (U12-type) reporter intron. Lastly, the concordance of bioinformatic predictions and cellular assay results was investigated.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0235655PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7337319PMC
September 2020

Exome sequencing in 57 patients with self-limited focal epilepsies of childhood with typical or atypical presentations suggests novel candidate genes.

Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2020 Jul 29;27:104-110. Epub 2020 May 29.

Department of Medical Genetics, Member of the ERN EpiCARE, University Hospital of Lyon, Lyon, France; Institut NeuroMyoGène, CNRS UMR 5310 - INSERM U1217, Lyon, France; Université de Lyon - Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France. Electronic address:

Objective: Self-limited focal epilepsies of childhood (SFEC) are amongst the best defined and most frequent epilepsy syndromes affecting children with usually normal developmental milestones. They include core syndromes such as Rolandic epilepsy or "Benign" epilepsy with Centro-Temporal Spikes and the benign occipital epilepsies, the early onset Panayiotopoulos syndrome and the late-onset Gastaut type. Atypical forms exist for all of them. Atypical Rolandic epilepsies are conceptualized as belonging to a continuum reaching from the "benign" RE to the severe end of the Landau-Kleffner (LKS) and Continuous Spike-Waves during Sleep syndromes (CSWS). GRIN2A has been shown to cause the epilepsy-aphasia continuum that includes some patients with atypical Rolandic epilepsy with frequent speech disorders, LKS and CSWS. In the present study, we searched novel genes causing SFEC with typical or atypical presentations.

Methods: Exome sequencing was performed in 57 trios. Patients presented with typical or atypical SFEC, negative for GRIN2A pathogenic variant.

Results: We found rare candidate variants in 20 patients. Thirteen had occurred de novo and were mostly associated to atypical Rolandic Epilepsy. Two of them could be considered as disease related: a null variant in GRIN2B and a missense variant in CAMK2A. Others were considered good candidates, including a substitution affecting a splice site in CACNG2 and missense variants in genes encoding enzymes involved in chromatin remodeling.

Significance: Our results further illustrate the fact that atypical SFEC are more likely to have Mendelian inheritance than typical SFEC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpn.2020.05.003DOI Listing
July 2020