Publications by authors named "G Rao Lavanya"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

CRISPR based development of RNA editing and the diagnostic platform.

Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci 2021 15;179:117-159. Epub 2021 Feb 15.

Department of Biotechnology Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. Electronic address:

Clustered Regularly Interspersed Short Palindromic Repeat-CRISPR-Associated (CRISPR-Cas) system has improved the ability to edit and control gene expression as desired. Genome editing approaches are currently leading the biomedical research with improved focus on direct nuclease dependent editing. So far, the research was predominantly intended on genome editing over the DNA level, recent adapted techniques are initiating to secure momentum through their proficiency to provoke modifications in RNA sequence. Integration of this system besides to lateral flow method allows reliable, quick, sensitive, precise and inexpensive diagnostic. These interesting methods illustrate only a small proportion of what is technically possible for this novel technology, but several technological obstacles need to be overcome prior to the CRISPR-Cas genome editing system can meet its full ability. This chapter covers the particulars on recent advances in CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology including diagnosis and technical advancements, followed by molecular mechanism of CRISPR-based RNA editing and diagnostic tools and types, and CRISPR-Cas-based biosensors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.pmbts.2020.12.015DOI Listing
February 2021

Subjective and objective measures of the patient experience before, during, and after intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections.

Indian J Ophthalmol 2021 Apr;69(4):890-894

Aravind Eye Hospital and Research Institute, Pondicherry, India.

Purpose: To assess patient experience of intravitreal injections using vital-signs, visual-experience, pain-rating and emotional response during intravitreal anti-VEGF injections.

Methods: A prospective observational study of patient experience of intravitreal anti-VEGF injections done following metrics were collected pre-injection, during injection, and post-injection: pain assessment using visual analog score, fear-response rating, visual-experience questionnaire, and vital-signs.

Results: A total of one-hundred-and-seventy-four patients undergoing intravitreal anti-VEGF injections for retinal pathologies were included in the study. Mean age was 58.8 ± 10.4 years in <5 injection group (n = 133) and 59.02 ± 9.0 years in ≥5 injection group (n = 41) (P = 0.90).During injection, 90.2% of patients in <5 injection group reported moderate or severe pain compared to 78% of patients in ≥5 injection group. In pre and post-injection phases, mild-to-moderate pain was reported in both groups (P = <0.001). Ninety-two (52.9%) patients reported having a mild frightening experience. There was no statistical significance in patients assessment of fear with respect to age, sex, or number of injections. The Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) during and following injection ((SBP 171.7 ± 21.1,150.8 ± 16.2) procedures was significantly higher in cases with <5 injections when comparing to cases with >5 injections (SBP 159.7 ± 26.4, 143.2 ± 17.0) (P = 0.003), (P = 0.011). DBP, heart rate, pulse rate measurements were similar among patients in all phases of the study.

Conclusion: We report a large sample size with comprehensive assessments of the patient experience. Higher pain ratings in the <5 injection group, the increase in the SBP in the pre-and during injection phases, and the overall rating of mild-to-moderate fear during the procedure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijo.IJO_1269_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8012954PMC
April 2021

Design, synthesis, spectral characterization and molecular docking studies of novel pyranoquinolinyl dihydropyridine carboxylates as potential antibacterial agents including Vibrio cholerae with minimal cytotoxity towards fibroblast cell line (L-929).

Bioorg Chem 2021 Feb 12;107:104582. Epub 2021 Jan 12.

PG & Research Department of Chemistry, Arignar Anna Govt. Arts and Science College Cheyyar, Tamilnadu, India.

Novel pyranoquinolinyl dihydropyridine carboxylate (PDC) derivatives were designed by incorporating the multi-drug resistance modulating effects of 1,4 dihydropyridines along with potential antibacterial activity of quinolines in the molecular design. The designed PDC derivatives were synthesized by multi-step synthesis involving Michael addition, reduction followed by inverse electro demand Diels-Alder reaction to produce pyranoquinolinyl dihydropyridine carboxylates in good yields. All the PDC derivatives were characterized by H NMR, C NMR, FT-IR, Mass spectral and CHN analysis. The Quinolinyl dihydropyridine carboxylate derivatives were evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method. Molecular docking studies revealed that the exo diethyl 4-(4aR,5S,10bR)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3,4,4a,5,6,10b-hexahydro-2H-pyrano[3,2-c]quinolin-8-yl)-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate diastereomer (5c) forms four hydrogen bonds with the cell wall protein of vibrio cholerae in comparison to the endo diethyl 4-((4aR,5R,10bR)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3,4,4a,5,6,10b-hexahydro-2H-pyrano[3,2-c]quinolin-8-yl)-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate diastereomer (4c) which forms two hydrogen bonds with the cell wall protein of vibrio cholerae and hence leading to better anchorage, enhanced gold score and relatively good antibacterial activity for the exo PDC derivatives. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the active compounds was evaluated by macro dilution method. The mechanism of antibacterial action of the PDC derivatives was investigated by SEM studies. The cytotoxicity of PDC derivatives were evaluated against fibroblast cells (L-929).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bioorg.2020.104582DOI Listing
February 2021

Evaluation of gingival melanin pigmentation in pediatric population- An observational study.

J Family Med Prim Care 2019 Aug 28;8(8):2623-2627. Epub 2019 Aug 28.

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, 162, Poonamallee High Road, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Saveetha University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the gingival melanin pigmentation in the Indian pediatric population. The aim of this study is to find any association between age and melanin distribution, age and intensity of melanin distribution, sex and melanin distribution, sex and intensity of melanin distribution, skin tone and melanin distribution, skin tone and intensity of melanin distribution and finally the association between melanin distribution and intensity.

Background: Pigmentation on the interdental papilla, attached and marginal gingiva is commonly found in various races across the world. There is lack of literature for documentation of the same in the pediatric population.

Materials And Methods: Intensity of melanin pigmentation was observed by the gingival melanin pigmentation index (class 1- class 6) as given by Ponnaiyan This cross-sectional, observational study was conducted in the Institution. 100 children were selected from the age group of 1-12 years of age. The association between the various parameters were verified using Chi square test.

Results: With the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that the distribution of melanin pigmentation is not affected by age, sex and skin color. The intensity of melanin pigmentation is not affected by age and sex. The skin colour can be used as a predictor to know the intensity of melanin pigmentation in both anteriors and posteriors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_332_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6753806PMC
August 2019

The first target specific, highly diastereoselective synthesis, design and characterization of pyranoquinolinyl acrylic acid diastereomers as potential α-glucosidase inhibitors.

Bioorg Chem 2019 03 20;84:125-136. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

PG& Research Department of Chemistry, Arignar Anna Govt Arts College, Cheyyar, Tamil Nadu, India.

In the present investigation we report the first target specific, highly diastereoselective synthesis of new class of pyranoquinolinyl/furoquinolinyl-acrylic acid diastereomers and evaluation of their invitro α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. All the products were thoroughly characterized by H NMR, C NMR, FT-IR, Mass spectral and CHN analysis. A highly diastereoselective target specific route of synthesis for the biologically active diastereomers were developed by usingchiral catalyst Europium tris[3-heptafluoropropylhydroxyl methylene]-(-)-camphorate (A) or Europiumtris[3-(trifluoromethyl)hydroxylmethylene]-(+)-camphorate (B). It was found that among a set of 4 diastereomeric products obtained, exodiasteromers of pyranoquinolinyl acrylic acid adducts exhibited relatively high α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. The newly synthesized compounds exhibited IC values in the range of (0.40 ± 0.02-30.3 ± 0.84 μM) as compared to standard acarbose (IC = 0.65 ± 0.02 μM). It was found that compounds 11a, 11c, 11d and 12d were found to be more active than standard acarbose. It was also found that unsubstituted compound (11a) or compounds with chlorine or methoxy substituent (11c, 11d, 12d) showed potential α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. However a reversal in activity was observed with Nitro substituent (11b, 13b) wherein the endodiastereomers were found to be more active than exodiastereomers. Molecular docking studies were used for design of the compound and understand the mode of binding between the compound and target enzyme. A plausible mechanism for the diastereoselective synthesis was also proposed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bioorg.2018.11.026DOI Listing
March 2019

Locally advanced cervical cancer: A study of 5-year outcomes.

Indian J Cancer 2018 Jan-Mar;55(1):45-49

Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among Indian women. This present retrospective study was conducted to report patient outcomes with locally advanced cervical cancer treated in the year 2010.

Materials And Methods: Case records of cervical cancer patients registered from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2010 were retrieved. A total of 1200 patients were registered, of which 583 received either definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Of these, 345 patients who received complete treatment at our hospital were included for outcome analysis. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize patient- and treatment-related variables, and Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed for survival analysis.

Results: The median age was 56 years (range: 33-90). Squamous carcinoma was the most common histology (91.4%) and the majority were FIGO Stage III (45.4%). Median follow-up of the cohort was 44 months (1-85 months). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) across stages was 50%. Most important predictor of DFS was FIGO staging (Stage II vs. Stage III: 62% vs. 45%) and use of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CTRT) l (RT vs. CTRT: 32% vs. 57%, respectively). Patients aged >70 years had a significantly poor DFS at 5 years; however, did not have any effect on survival. Grade 3 or more late toxicity was seen in only 5% of the patients.

Conclusion: Five-year DFS of 62% and 45% of Stage II and III patients treated under routine care represents comparable stage-matched results to the rest of the world, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijc.IJC_428_17DOI Listing
November 2018

Molecular Mapping of QTLs for Heat Tolerance in Chickpea.

Int J Mol Sci 2018 Jul 25;19(8). Epub 2018 Jul 25.

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru Hyderabad 502324, India.

Chickpea ( L.), a cool-season legume, is increasingly affected by heat-stress at reproductive stage due to changes in global climatic conditions and cropping systems. Identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for heat tolerance may facilitate breeding for heat tolerant varieties. The present study was aimed at identifying QTLs associated with heat tolerance in chickpea using 292 F recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed from the cross ICC 4567 (heat sensitive) × ICC 15614 (heat tolerant). Phenotyping of RILs was undertaken for two heat-stress (late sown) and one non-stress (normal sown) environments. A genetic map spanning 529.11 cM and comprising 271 genotyping by sequencing (GBS) based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers was constructed. Composite interval mapping (CIM) analysis revealed two consistent genomic regions harbouring four QTLs each on CaLG05 and CaLG06. Four major QTLs for number of filled pods per plot (FPod), total number of seeds per plot (TS), grain yield per plot (GY) and % pod setting (%PodSet), located in the CaLG05 genomic region, were found to have cumulative phenotypic variation of above 50%. Nineteen pairs of epistatic QTLs showed significant epistatic effect, and non-significant QTL × environment interaction effect, except for harvest index (HI) and biomass (BM). A total of 25 putative candidate genes for heat-stress were identified in the two major genomic regions. This is the first report on QTLs for heat-stress response in chickpea. The markers linked to the above mentioned four major QTLs can facilitate marker-assisted breeding for heat tolerance in chickpea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms19082166DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6121679PMC
July 2018

Potential of pyrethroid-synergised pyrethrum on stored product insects and implications for use as prophylactic sprays.

J Food Sci Technol 2018 Jun 6;55(6):2270-2278. Epub 2018 Apr 6.

Food Protectants and Infestation Control Department, CSIR-Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore, 570 020 India.

The study was conducted to evaluate the synergistic effects of 2% pyrethrum extract with synthetic pyrethroids on the mortality of stored product insects. Contact toxicity was performed at variable concentrations observing mortality at 12, 24 and 48 h durations. The results of the present study indicated that, pyrethrum + deltamethrin combination (25:1 ratio) was effective on the adults of (F.) and (Herbst). On the other hand, pyrethrum + cypermethrin combination proved effective against (L.). The efficacy of the tested combination showed reasonable increase in mortality response in treated insects over increasing exposures. At 48 h, 450 ppm pyrethrum + deltamethrin combination induced 25, 90 and 97% mortalities in , and adults; while, pyrethrum-cypermethrin combination recorded 75, 45 and 75% mortalities respectively. On the other hand, it was observed that, among the pyrethrum alone treatments i.e. at 300, 450 and 600 ppm concentrations, maximum mortality (62.5%) was observed in exposed to 600 ppm pyrethrum for 48 h. The effective LC concentrations for pyrethrum (600 ppm) + deltamethrin combination was estimated to be as 0.1987 and 0.7039 µl/cm for and adults respectively. Contrastingly, for treatments with , a LC value of 0.8673 µl/cm was recorded for pyrethrum (600 ppm) + cypermethrin mixture. This investigation strengthens the fact that pyrethrum along with pyrethroids is effective against storage insect pests which can be promisingly a safer insecticidal combination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13197-018-3144-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5976612PMC
June 2018

Cancer cervix: Establishing an evidence-based strategy, an experience of a tertiary care centre in India.

Curr Probl Cancer 2018 Mar - Apr;42(2):137-147. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, India.

Carcinoma cervix is a common cancer among Indian women. Evidence based management is essential for best practice in treatment of carcinoma cervix for its effective control. The current imaging system like CT, MRI and PET CT scans have contributed in identifying the patients for optimal treatment and delivering treatment accurately. For stages IB2 to IV, concurrent chemoradiation is advocated with improvement in overall survival proven with randomized trials. Brachytherapy is an integral part in the radiation treatment. Imaged-guided brachytherapy using MRI is desirable, however less expensive imaging modalities such as CT and ultrasonography has been evaluated. In special situation such as for HIV positive patients and patients with neuroendocrine tumors have role of radiotherapy. For further improvement in control of cancer, it is required to integrate basic research to answer clinically relevant questions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.currproblcancer.2018.01.005DOI Listing
April 2019

Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of (1,4-phenylene)bis(arylsulfonylpyrazoles and isoxazoles).

Eur J Med Chem 2014 Feb 12;73:187-94. Epub 2013 Dec 12.

Department of Chemistry, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502, Andhra Pradesh, India. Electronic address:

A new class of (1,4-phenylene)bis(arylsufonylpyrazoles and isoxazoles) were synthesized by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile imines and nitrile oxides to the 1,4-bis((E)-2-(arylsulfonyl)vinyl)benzenes in the presence of chloramine-T. Compound 7f exhibited pronounced antimicrobial activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmech.2013.11.041DOI Listing
February 2014

Synthesis and antioxidant activities of acetamidomethylsulfonyl bis heterocycles-oxazolyl/thiazolyl/imidazolyl-1,3,4-oxadiazoles.

Arch Pharm (Weinheim) 2013 Jul 25;346(7):511-20. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Department of Chemistry, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.

A new class of acetamidomethylsulfonyl bis heterocycles-oxazolyl-1,3,4-oxadiazoles, -thiazolyl-1,3,4-oxadiazoles, and -imidazolyl-1,3,4-oxadiazoles were synthesized from the synthetic intermediates, methyl 2-((4-aryloxazol-2-ylcarbamoyl)methylsulfonyl)acetate, methyl 2-((4-arylthiazol-2-ylcarbamoyl)methylsulfonyl)acetate, and methyl 2-((4-aryl-1H-imidazol-2-ylcarbamoyl)methylsulfonyl)acetate. All the title compounds were tested for their antioxidant activity. The oxadiazolylmethylsulfonyloxazolylacetamide displayed excellent radical-scavenging activity when compared with the standard ascorbic acid.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ardp.201300115DOI Listing
July 2013

Acetone Extract from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa: A Potent Natural Antioxidant.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2012 18;2012:535479. Epub 2012 Oct 18.

Natural Products Research Centre, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112, Thailand.

Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Myrtaceae) has been employed in traditional Thai medicine to treat colic diarrhoea, dysentery, abscesses, haemorrhage, and gynaecopathy. In addition, it has been used to formulate skin-whitening, anti-aging and skin beautifying agents. Ethnomedical activities of this plant may be due its antioxidant property. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate both in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of R. tomentosa leaf extract. In vitro antioxidant activity of the extract was assessed by lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and metal chelating activity. R. tomentosa extract demonstrated its free radical scavenging effects in concentration dependent manner. In vivo antioxidant activity of the extract was conducted in Swiss Albino mice. Levels of thio-barbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione (GSH), and the activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in blood, liver, and kidney were analyzed using microtitre plate photometer. Administration of CCl(4) caused significant increase in TBARS and decrease in GSH, SOD, CAT and GPx levels. In contrast, R. tomentosa extract (0.8 g/kg) effectively prevented these alterations and maintained the antioxidant status. The results suggest that R. tomentosa extract can serve as a potent antioxidant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/535479DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3484404PMC
November 2012

Nutritional evaluation and utilisation of quality protein maize, Nityashree hybrid maize, and normal maize in broiler chickens.

Br Poult Sci 2011 Oct;52(5):632-8

Project Directorate on Poultry, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad 500030, India.

Three experiments were conducted to determine the apparent metabolisable energy, apparent digestible amino acid values, and utilisation of three maize varities in chickens: quality protein maize (QPM), hybrid maize Nityashree (HMN) and normal maize (NM). There was no significant difference in the apparent metabolisable energy (AME) content amongst the three varieties of maize. Lysine and threonine digestibilities were significantly higher in QPM compared to either HMN or NM. No difference in the digestibilities of other amino acids occurred among the three different maize varieties. There was no difference between diets containing NM or HMN for body weight gain (21 and 40 d of age) and overall feed conversion ratio (0-40 d), but values were significantly higher for QPM (and Lys-supplemented NM) diets. The relative weights of dressed meat yield and giblets were unaffected by dietary replacement of NM with QPM, HMN, or Lys supplementation of the NM diet. However, abdominal fat content decreased and breast meat yield increased with both dietary replacement of NM with QPM and Lys supplementation of the NM diet. The concentration of protein in serum was significantly increased by dietary replacement of NM with QPM. Adding Lys to the NM based diet significantly increased the Ca concentration in serum compared with NM or HMN diets. However, the highest concentration of Ca in serum was found in the QPM diet. The concentration of total cholesterol in serum significantly decreased by either replacing NM with QPM or adding Lys to the NM based diet, compared with the NM diet. These results suggested that the feeding value of quality protein maize was superior to normal maize, while the feeding value of hybrid maize Nityashree was similar to that of normal maize.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00071668.2011.626758DOI Listing
October 2011

A novel human CRYGD mutation in a juvenile autosomal dominant cataract.

Mol Vis 2010 May 22;16:887-96. Epub 2010 May 22.

Department of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka state, India.

Purpose: Identification of causal mutation in the crystallin, connexin, and paired box gene 6 (PAX6) genes associated with childhood cataract in patients from India.

Methods: In this study, forty eight members from seventeen families and 148 sporadic cases of childhood cataract were evaluated. Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on available affected and unaffected family members. Samples of genomic DNA were PCR amplified to screen for mutations in the candidate genes viz., alpha-A crystallin (CRYAA), beta- B2 crystallin (CRYBB2), gamma-A crystallin (CRYGA), gamma-B crystallin (CRYGB), gamma-C crystallin (CRYGC), gamma-D crystallin (CRYGD), gap junction alpha-3 (GJA3), gap junction alpha-8 (GJA8), and PAX6 based on polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis. Samples showing any band mobility shift were subjected to bidirectional sequencing to confirm the variation. Co-segregation of the observed change with the disease phenotype was further tested by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for the appropriate restriction site.

Results: DNA sequencing analysis of CRYAA, CRYBB2, CRYGA-D, GJA3, GJA8, and PAX6 of the affected members of a family (C-35) showed a novel heterozygous missense mutation C>A at position 229 in CRYGD in three affected members of family C-35 with anterior polar coronary cataract. This variation C229A substitution created a novel restriction site for AluI and resulted in a substitution of highly conserved arginine at position 77 by serine (R77S). AluI restriction site analysis confirmed the transversion mutation. Analysis of the available unaffected members of the family (C-35) and 100 unrelated control subjects (200 chromosomes) of the same ethnic background did not show R77S variation. Data generated using ProtScale and PyMOL programs revealed that the mutation altered the stability and solvent-accessibility of the CRYGD protein.

Conclusions: We describe here a family having anterior polar coronary cataract that co-segregates with the novel allele R77S of CRYGD in all the affected members. The same was found to be absent in the ethnically matched controls (n=100) studied. Interestingly the residue Arg has been frequently implicated in four missense (R15C, R15S, R37S, and R59H) and in one truncation mutation (R140X) of CRYGD. In two of the reported mutations Arg residues have been replaced with Serine. This finding further expands the mutation spectrum of CRYGD in association with childhood cataract and demonstrates a possible mechanism of cataractogenesis. Screening of other familial (n=48) and sporadic (n=148) cases of childhood cataract, did not reveal any previously reported or novel mutation in the candidate genes screened.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2875257PMC
May 2010

Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in mung bean germplasm.

J Genet 2008 Apr;87(1):65-74

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Allahabad Agricultural Institute Deemed University, Allahabad 211 007, India.

RAPD profiles were used to identify the extent of diversity among 54 accessions of mung bean that included both improved and local land races. Out of the 40 primers screened, seven primers generated 174 amplification products with an average of 24.85 bands per primer. The RAPD profiles were analysed for Jaccard's similarity coefficients that was found to be in the range from 0 to 0.48, indicating the presence of wide range of genetic diversity at molecular level. Cluster analysis was carried out based on distances (1-similarity coefficient) using neighbour-joining method in Free Tree package. The dendrogram resolved all the accessions into two major clusters, I (with 11 accessions) and II (with 43 accessions). However, the cluster was further divided into four subclusters (II A with six, II B with nine, II C with 15 and II D with 13 accessions). The distribution of the accessions in different clusters and subclusters appears to be related to their performance in field conditions for 10 morphological traits that were scored. This study indicated that the RAPD profiles provide an easy and simple technique for preliminary genetic diversity assessment of mung bean accessions that may reflect morphological trait differences among them.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12041-008-0009-3DOI Listing
April 2008